Nokia Siemens Networks Outlines More Details Of Strategy At Analyst Event

At its 2011 Analyst Event in Boston, Nokia Siemens Networks (NSN) outlined more details of its recently announced strategy review. In our view, the new focus NSN is taking is right. NSN is focusing on growth segments of the infrastructure market and will generate large savings from operating expenses and production overheads. In addition to its focus on providing the most efficient mobile broadband network infrastructure, NSN also highlighted the importance of customer experience management (CEM) as an integral part of its strategy.

NSN also provided more guidance on which market segments it no longer considers core. These include wireline, microwave, Wimax, perfect voice, and business support systems. Some of these, microwave and Wimax, it already spun off. NSN estimates that the overall revenue impact of its non-core disposals will total 10% of its current revenue base. The impact on profit will be less than 10%, as these non-core disposals are low-margin operations.

NSN believes that telcos increasingly demand end-to-end solutions from their equipment vendor partners. No equipment vendors can credibly deliver such end-to-end solutions on their own. Hence, NSN is positioning itself as an ecosystems manager for end-to-end solutions. As part of its innovation drive, NSN increasingly focuses on devising concepts for solutions rather than simply focusing on product upgrades. For instance, Liquid Net is a concept for network infrastructure design that supports a more efficient usage of underutilized infrastructure capacity based on a range of NSN products. Similarly, NSN places great emphasis on its CEM solution, which helps telcos to transform their services offerings by enhancing network-related features that affect customer experience and satisfaction.

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A Copernican Shift (And A Tip Of My Hat To Randy Heffner)

As my first calendar year as an analyst draws to a close, I wanted to thank everybody who has read and commented on my blog and say that I look forward to even more next year. In closing out the year, I turn for a moment away from emerging technology to share an email I wrote to one of our clients in response to some questions he had about the changing nature of EA. In describing the future, I'm going to blatantly pirate a term that Randy Heffner has been using for a while because as I sought to answer this client's questions, I realized how absolutely spot on it is. here is the relevant text of that email:

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Happy to answer your questions as outlined below in the inquiry request. We have published a report along similar lines, BT 2020: IT's Future In The Empowered Era, that I recommend for additional ideas. Regarding timing, 2015 will be a stepping stone towards 2020, so I’ll focus answers on 2020, and you can extrapolate to 2015 in terms of the migration that needs to occur.

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More Holiday Cheer: SCIM Cloud Provisioning Standard Reaches A Big Milestone

I've blogged and published research before about the emerging Simple Cloud Identity Management (SCIM) standard. The SCIM group has just approved Version 1.0. No, it's not your imagination: important standards around loosely coupled identity management really are being developed, tested, and deployed at a faster rate than ever before.

What does this new pace mean for security pros? New identity protocols can be disruptive to large enterprises that have already deployed older solutions, but these new solutions will enable IT organizations to reduce costs and improve agility in managing access to/from smaller partners and customers that don't have the means to deploy the heavy stuff. That makes access control easier to achieve in a Zero Trust world. (Andras Cser and I touch on the theme of "leaner and cleaner" identity protocols in our just-published Identity And Access Management: 2012 Budget And Planning Guide, and I do a deeper dive, assessing the future of SAML and the business value of newer federation protocols, in OpenID Connect Heralds The "Identity Singularity".)

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CRM And BPM Solutions Converge To Domesticate Untamed Customer Processes

I’ve just finished up several months of research digging into the best practices of how leading organizations aspire to implement outside-in, customer-focused, cross-functional processes that transform the organization and set it on the path toward continuous improvement. I found that these companies are moving from isolated business process management (BPM) and/or front-office customer relationship management (CRM) projects toward broader transformation initiatives across the organization. At the core of this trend is a desire by these organizations, especially in services industries, to domesticate their “untamed” or “invisible” processes that touch customers.

My report on the best practices for process-centric CRM will be published soon. A key finding is the growing convergence of data-centric CRM, BPM, and dynamic case management (DCM) solutions. The right mix of these solutions, of course, depends on the use cases you are designing for. For example:

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A Christmas Present From MIT?

As much as the cloud computing model makes sense to me, my security sensibilities cry out about information risk every time I start to consider actual implementation for data of value across an enterprise.

A model which has always made sense has been to place only encrypted data in the cloud, holding the keys locally. This solution gives you control over data access, bypassing any Patriot Act concerns, but allows realization of the benefits of a shared, cloud infrastructure. It has always been recognized, however, that this solution has a number of drawbacks, such as:

  • The immense corporate sensitivity of the encryption keys utilised. These keys become essential to doing business.  If they are corrupted, lost or held hostage by hacktivists, for example, then the organization stops dead in the water.  
  • The difficulty of creating indexes, searching and applying transactions across encrypted data stores. If the concept is to keep the keys away from the cloud environment then actions such as indexing, searching or running database functions become very challenging.
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The Year Ahead In Advanced Analytics? Advances on All Fronts!

Advanced analytics was the hot new frontier of business intelligence (BI) in 2011. The growing vogue for “data science” stemmed in part from many users’ desire to take their BI investments to the next level of sophistication, leveraging multivariate statistical analysis, data mining, and predictive modeling into powerful new applications for customer relationship management (CRM) and back-office business processes.

Business investments in advanced analytics will continue to deepen in the coming year. Here are some of the highlights that Forrester anticipates in this vibrant field in 2012:

  • Open-source platforms will expand their footprint in advanced analytics. As the enterprise Hadoop market continues to mature and many companies deploy their clusters for the most demanding analytical challenges, data scientists will begin to migrate toward this new, open source-centric platform. At the same time, enterprise adoption of the open-source R language will grow in 2012, and we’ll see greater industry convergence between Hadoop and R, especially as analytics tool vendors integrate both technologies tightly into their offerings.
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Five Axioms For Application Development In 2012

Software Is Not Code; It Creates Experiences

Ultimately, customers don't judge you based on how well you gather business requirements, choose development technologies, manage projects, or march through the development process — they judge you based on how they feel before, during, and after they use your software. This is the digital experience. If you get the customer experience wrong, then nothing else matters. And expectation inflation is sky-high thanks to the Apple-led smartphone revolution. To succeed in the new age of digital experience, application development professionals must collaborate with their business partners and customers to create experiences that customers love. You need a new approach represented by these five axioms:

  1. Software is not code; it creates experience.
  2. Development teams are not coders; they are experience creators.
  3. Technical talent is table stakes; great developers must be design and domain experts.
  4. Process is bankrupt without design; you get what you design, so you had better get the design right.
  5. Software is a creative endeavor, not an industrial process like building automobiles. Structure your methodology to empower your creative talent.

Doable? Definitely. Forrester clients can read the full report to learn how: Digital Experience Strategy: Follow These Three Mega Rules To Beat The Competition In 2012.

Xmas IAM Spending Spree: Quest Software Acquires BiTKOO, Enters IAM Suite Provider Market

With only 4 stack players in Identity and Access Management, it is always welcoming news to see a new company joining the space. Quest Software is on a shopping spree: it acquired e-DMZ (privileged identity management), Völcker Informatik AG (provisioning), Symlabs (virtual directories), and now BiTKOO (XACML entitlement management). Forrester expects that in reaction to its main competitor NetIQ taking over Novell’s IAM portfolio, Quest will expand significantly into the non-Windows, heterogeneous IAM space. Forrester further expects that Symantec and to some degree Intel will follow suit, as both of these companies announced cloud-based IAM offerings.

The Year Ahead In Big Data? Big, Cool, New Stuff Looms Large!

Big data was inescapable in 2011. Without a doubt, it was the paramount banner story in data management, advanced analytics, and business intelligence (BI). The hype has been relentless, but it’s been driven by substantial innovations on many fronts.

The big data mania will intensify even further in the coming year. Here are some of the highlights that Forrester foresees in this exciting space in 2012:

  • Enterprise Hadoop deployments will expand at a rapid clip. Many enterprises have spent the past year or two kicking the tires of Hadoop, the emerging open source approach for scaling data analytics into the stratosphere of petabyte volumes, real-time velocities, and polystructured varieties. The market for enterprise-grade Hadoop solutions has grown by leaps and bounds and now includes several dozen vendors. Users all over the world and in most industries have invested aggressively in the technology and stand poised to bring their Hadoop clusters on line in the coming year. The size of the in-deployment clusters will almost certainly grow at least tenfold in 2012 as companies roll new data sources, new analytic challenges, and new business applications into their Hadoop initiatives.
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Top 10 IT Service Management Challenges For 2012: More Emphasis On The “Service” And The “Management”

As we approach the holiday season and possibly the end of the financial/budgetary year, let’s pause for a moment to think about 2012. For many IT infrastructure and operations (I&O) professionals, 2011 was a challenging year; the bad news is that 2012 isn’t going to be any easier. With the pressures of the continued mandate to “deliver more with less” added to by increased business demands on, and scrutiny of, IT service delivery; all against a backdrop of increased business and IT complexity.

The high level view

  • Increased business scrutiny: IT cost transparency and value demonstration. One could argue that the challenges listed as “increased expectations” next will also increase the scrutiny of IT performance.
  • Increased expectations: agility, availability, “hardware,” and support and customer service.
  • Increased complexity: cloud per se, mobility, and compliance.
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