Data Scientist: Do You Truly Need Big Data?

Data science has historically had to content itself with mere samples. Few data scientists have had the luxury of being able amass petabytes of data on every relevant variable of every entity in the population under study.

The big data revolution is making that constraint a thing of the past. Think of this new paradigm as “whole-population analytics,” rather than simply the ability to pivot, drill, and crunch into larger data sets. Over time, as the world evolves toward massively parallel approaches such as Hadoop, we will be able to do true 360-degree analysis. For example, as more of the world’s population takes to social networking and conducts more of its lives in public online forums, we will all have comprehensive, current, and detailed market intelligence on every demographic available as if it were a public resource. As the price of storage, processing, and bandwidth continue their inexorable decline, data scientists will be able to keep the entire population of all relevant polystructured information under their algorithmic microscopes, rather than have to rely on minimal samples, subsets, or other slivers.

Clearly, the big data revolution is fostering a powerful new type of data science. Having more comprehensive data sets at our disposal will enable more fine-grained long-tail analysis, microsegmentation, next best action, customer experience optimization, and digital marketing applications. It is speeding answers to any business question that requires detailed, interactive, multidimensional statistical analysis; aggregation, correlation, and analysis of historical and current data; modeling and simulation, what-if analysis, and forecasting of alternative future states; and semantic exploration of unstructured data, streaming information, and multimedia.

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Top 10 Business Intelligence Predictions For 2012

Demands by users of business intelligence (BI) applications to "just get it done" are turning typical BI relationships, such as business/IT alignment and the roles that traditional and next-generation BI technologies play, upside down. As business users demand more control over BI applications, IT is losing its once-exclusive control over BI platforms, tools, and applications. It's no longer business as usual: For example, organizations are supplementing previously unshakable pillars of BI, such as tightly controlled relational databases, with alternative platforms. Forrester recommends that business and IT professionals responsible for BI understand and start embracing some of the latest BI trends — or risk falling behind.

Traditional BI approaches often fall short for the two following reasons (among many others):

  • BI hasn't fully empowered information workers, who still largely depend on IT
  • BI platforms, tools and applications aren't agile enough
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HP Embraces Calxeda ARM Architecture With "Project Moonshot" - New Hyperscale Business Unit Program

What's the Big Deal?

Emerging ARM server Calxeda has been hinting for some time that they had a significant partnership announcement in the works, and while we didn’t necessarily not believe them, we hear a lot of claims from startups telling us to “stay tuned” for something big. Sometimes they pan out, sometimes they simply go away. But this morning Calxeda surpassed our expectations by unveiling just one major systems partner – but it just happens to be Hewlett Packard, which dominates the WW market for x86 servers.

At its core (unintended but not bad pun), the HP Hyperscale business unit Project Moonshot and Calxeda’s server technology are about improving the efficiency of web and cloud workloads, and promises improvements in excess of 90% in power efficiency and similar improvements in physical density compared with current x86 solutions. As I noted in my first post on ARM servers and other documents, even if these estimates turn out to be exaggerated, there is still a generous window within which to do much, much, better than current technologies. And workloads (such as memcache, Hadoop, static web servers) will be selected for their fit to this new platform, so the workloads that run on these new platforms will potentially come close to the cases quoted by HP and Calxeda.

The Program And New HP Business Unit

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