BI In The Cloud: Separating Facts From Fiction

“… and they lived happily ever after.” This is the typical ending of most Hollywood movies, which is why I am not a big fan. I much prefer European or independent movies that leave it up to the viewer to draw their own conclusions. It’s just so much more realistic. Keep this in mind, please, as you read this blog, because its only purpose is to present my point of view on what’s happening in the cloud BI market, not to predict where it’s going. I’ll leave that up to your comments — just like your own thoughts and feelings after a good, thoughtful European or indie movie.

Market definition

First of all, let’s define the market. Unfortunately, the terms SaaS and cloud are often used synonymously and therefore, alas, incorrectly.

  • SaaS is just a licensing structure. Many vendors (open source, for example) offer SaaS software subscription models, which has nothing to do with cloud-based hosting.
  • Cloud, in my humble opinion, is all about multitenant software hosted on public or private clouds. It’s not about cloud hosting of traditional software innately architected for single tenancy.
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Compliance And Cloud – Responsible Or Accountable?

It’s interesting how many threads there are on the Internet that still debate the difference between these two words: “responsible” and “accountable.” Oddly enough, today I stumbled across two definitions, from seemingly respectable sources, that hold diametrically opposite views! To me, the answer is simple – you can delegate responsibility, but accountability remains fixed.

This is a key point in the extended enterprises in which we now function. Firms are now made up of a myriad of offshore and outsourced services, running on systems that are similarly fragmented and distributed across vendors. This complex tangle of people and data represents a huge challenge to the CISO, who remains accountable for the security, and often the compliance, of his employer yet is no longer responsible for their provision.

With a methodical and comprehensive process and a surfeit of resource (please stop laughing at the back!), the CISO does, however, have the ability to follow the data trails and manage risk down in this regard. Unfortunately, with the advent of cloud, things are taking a turn for the worse. Cloud vendors are reluctant to be scrutinized, and the security and compliance demands of the CISO can often go unanswered. If cloud really is to be a mainstay of computing in the future, something has to give – we need to find a balance where compliance and security assurance requirements are met without fatally undermining the cloud model. This is a key topic for 2012 and something we’ll be following with interest.  

As security professionals, we remain accountable for resolving these issues, no matter how much responsibility has been pushed to third parties and cloud vendors. So, how do you minimize the workload involved in managing the third parties that make up your extended enterprise, and how do you gain assurance around cloud vendors?

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Benioff Vs. Ellison -- David Vs. Goliath Or Cloudwash Vs. Proven Solutions?

I was at Marc Benioff’s subversive non-keynote at Oracle OpenWorld yesterday, and while it was fun to see all the hoopla (employees holding posters of Benioff cast as a dissident, shouting, honking, donuts, cocktails), it was also cool to have the "I was there when" moment as Oracle’s future biggest competitor draws the lines of battle that are likely to shape the enterprise software industry for the next decade. Truth be told, I think that Benioff was a bit too caught up in the fuss and the cloudwash to make me think he’s a mature and credible competitor yet, but he is clearly getting his gumption up.

Benioff pointed a finger at Exadata as a new mainframe, locking customers into proprietary hardware and forcing them to buy over-expensive gear from an industry monolith. He described his own company as “open,” allowing customers to move to any platform or any cloud; "philanthropic," donating $24 million in grants and using their OOW booth as an engine for giving; and "social," leveraging their internal social media engine Chatter to coordinate their rapid mobilization to deliver the non-keynote within 16 hours of being cancelled by Larry. And all of that is cool, but I think he skewed to tech industry buzz rather than focus on the real competitive forces between Oracle and Salesforce.

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The Empire Strikes Back — But Who’s The Target?

Source: Philips http://news6.designinterviews.com/tumblr_kzdg88og1l1qzel9oo1_500.jpg

It was only about a year ago when Larry Ellison was confusing the OpenWorld audience with the “cloud in a box” approach, and only a very few CIOs managed to turn a large Oracle landscape into a real private cloud based on an opex model to their business units. But a lot has changed since last year.

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Silk Browser, The BIG Leap For Amazon’s Fire, Shows Innovative Use Of App Internet

My colleague James Staten recently wrote about AutoDesk Cloud as an exemplar of the move toward App Internet, the concept of implementing applications that are distributed between local and cloud resources in a fashion that is transparent to the user except for the improved experience. His analysis is 100% correct, and AutoDesk Cloud represents a major leap in CAD functionality, intelligently offloading the inherently parallel and intensive rendering tasks and facilitating some aspects of collaboration.

But (and there’s always a “but”), having been involved in graphics technology on and off since the '80s, I would say that “cloud” implementation of rendering and analysis is something that has been incrementally evolving for decades, with hundreds of well-documented distributed environments with desktops fluidly shipping their renderings to local rendering and analysis farms that would today be called private clouds, with the results shipped back to the creating workstations. This work was largely developed and paid for either by universities and by media companies as part of major movie production projects. Some of them were of significant scale, such as “Massive,” the rendering and animation farm for "Lord of the Rings" that had approximately 1,500 compute nodes, and a subsequent installation at Weta that may have up to 7,000 nodes. In my, admittedly arguable, opinion, the move to AutoDesk Cloud, while representing a major jump in capabilities by making the cloud accessible to a huge number of users, does not represent a major architectural innovation, but rather an incremental step.

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