City Level Public Sector Opportunities In Asia Pacific: A Tale Of Two Urbanization Clusters

Forrester expects two different patterns of urbanization will emerge in Asia Pacific, excluding Japan (APEJ), each with its own rate of technology adoption, maturity of implementation, and ways in which cities will use technology to support urbanization. Forrester defines two categories of urbanization: cities in countries with low-to-moderate urbanization (LMU), and those with high urbanization (HU). Each of these is prevalent in a different set of countries, has different technology requirements, and will emphasize a different set of technology underpinnings for its eGovernment efforts.

  • LMU cities will focus on automation of basic tasks. LMU cities will remain focused on basic automation and bridging the digital divide, tilting heavily toward hardware, platform software, and packaged applications.
  • HU cities will focus on more efficient ICT infrastructure. HU cities will be more focused on upgrading legacy systems and modernizing the existing infrastructure to support open government and shared services concepts.

Nevertheless, Forrester predicts that seven technologies will be common to all cities to underpin their efforts to grapple with urbanization:

  • Cloud Computing: From Hype To Reality For Cities.
  • Mobile Apps And Devices: Faster Link-Up With Citizens.
  • Virtualization: A First Step Toward Cloud.
  • Social Media And Collaboration: Opening Up Two-Way Communication.
  • Analytics: Making Informed Decisions.
  • GIS: Beyond Mapping.
  • Security Software And Systems: From Information To Physical Security.
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Key Areas To Consider In SaaS Contract Negotiation

With the Sourcing and Vendor Management Forums coming up next week in Miami and at the end of the month in London, our team is busy finalizing content and rehearsing sessions. Personally the hottest question I have continued to get since the keynote I did last year on SaaS sourcing is the question of SaaS pricing and contract negotiation. So, what can you expect in the track session “Negotiating Cloud Pricing and Contracts” for those of you who can join us?

New data from the Q3 2011 services survey showing:

  1. SaaS is disrupting spend on traditional services. Nearly half of the firms we surveyed say that “as-a-service” spending has reduced spending on traditional on-premises IT spend. And, these firms also say that it will have a noticeable disruptive impact. Out of the firms who say “as-a-service” spending will reduce spending on traditional spend, 30% say this disruption will be 6% or more.   
  2. SaaS adoption has expanded into IT applications and industry-specific applications. Firms are now using SaaS for an increasingly wide range of solutions: horizontal applications like CRM and HR and collaboration applications like email still dominate the trend but now 13% of firms use SaaS for IT software such as asset management and 10% of firms use SaaS for industry-specific solutions such as insurance claims management.
  3. Firms are centralizing their approach to SaaS sourcing and vendor management. The recently gathered data shows a strong trend towards centralized SaaS strategy and formal multi-year plans around SaaS. Not surprisingly, this data also shows that firms expect to see a decrease in unsanctioned, business-led buying.  
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Nokia World 2011: back from the brink but not yet fully out of the woods

Katyayan Gupta Dan Bieler

This was possibly the most important Nokia World event ever. Nokia had to demonstrate that it can deliver against its plans. In February 2011, Nokia communicated its intention to team up with Microsoft to develop its new platform and to “entrust” its Symbian operating system to accenture. In total 3,000 visitors from 70 countries attended Nokia World 2011 in London to hear and see what the “new Nokia” looks like.

In essence it was clear what Nokia World 2011 would be all about before the actual event had even started. Nokia had to produce a device that can take on the iPhone and the Galaxy. At the event Nokia announced the launch of the first “real Windows phone” in the form of the Lumia 800. The result is an impressive device that certainly secured Nokia a seat on the table of the tripartite of leading smartphones platforms.

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The ABC Of ICT - The Top 10 People Issues

In my recent blog on the top 50 ITIL adoption mistakes many related to the people-side of changing the IT service management (ITSM) and IT delivery status quo. In many ways, people are the ultimate barrier (or success factor) to effective ITIL adoption or to other aspects of an IT infrastructure and operations (I&O) organization successfully meeting business demands for IT services.

We often get the technology and process elements of what we do in I&O right, but the people-side of things can be a different matter. Paul Wilkinson of GamingWorks has been a champion for addressing the ABC (attitude, behavior, and culture) of ICT for many years and he shares his (and his colleagues) thoughts with us below.

So what goes wrong?

As more and more organizations adopt ITSM frameworks such as ITIL, it often seems that ITIL or the framework is the goal itself, rather than being a means to an end – that is trying to improve the delivery of IT services from a business perspective.

Paul states that, in his experience, 70% of ITIL-adoption initiatives fail to deliver on their promises, i.e., realizing the value that the I&O organization (and business) had hoped for; with 50% of failures caused by resistance. However, we (the people) tend to blame the framework or the technology. But it often has nothing to do with ITIL – the root cause is commonly the way in which we (mis) apply and (mis) use the framework. That these failures are often down to people issues.

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Nokia World 2011: Back From The Brink But Not Yet Fully Out Of The Woods

Dan Bieler and Katyayan Gupta

This was possibly the most important Nokia World event ever. Nokia had to demonstrate that it can deliver against its plans. In February 2011, Nokia communicated its intention to team up with Microsoft to develop its new platform and to “entrust” its Symbian operating system to Accenture. In total, 3,000 visitors from 70 countries attended Nokia World 2011 in London to hear and see what the “new Nokia” looks like.

In essence, it was clear what Nokia World 2011 would be all about before the actual event had even started. Nokia had to produce a device that can take on the iPhone and the Galaxy. At the event, Nokia announced the launch of the first “real Windows phone” in the form of the Lumia 800. The result is an impressive device that certainly secured Nokia a seat at the table of the tripartite of leading smartphones platforms.

At a price point of €420, the Lumia 800 impresses through a very intuitive and refreshing interface. And yes, the choice of Microsoft as a partner has certainly produced the best ever Nokia device. It will give Apple and Samsung a run for their money. It was all the more noticeable that Microsoft was absent during the key note address. Nokia also unveiled its emerging market flagship "Asha" device series, which sits somewhere between feature and smartphones. The Asha family comprises four models that target the youth segment in emerging markets. These devices are priced between €60 to €115, feature touch and QWERTY, games like Angry Birds, and one of them is also dual SIM.

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Mobile Enablement Means Access

Music is a very important part of my life. At home I've always got something playing on the sound system, I never go anywhere without headphones, and my music collection takes up more space in my house (not to mention on my computer) than anything else. That's why on a recent trip up to Maine – a 4.5 hour ride from Boston – the first thing I did to prepare was make sure I had my phone for music on the drive, without which I'd be stuck with the radio. Having to listen to the same 40 songs for four and a half hours is something that could easily give me nightmares but it got me thinking about how much choice matters.

Ten years ago I would have been happy enough with just the radio. Then came Napster and the iPod and my world changed. I became aware the technology existed which meant I knew there was a better alternative to the radio. What's more, I was excited about it. I wanted to use my iPod and put new music on it. The product engaged me as it had engaged everyone around me. I think that correlates with what we're seeing today in firms across all industries where employees have long been locked into aging technology – which often doesn't do everything they need it to – by lack of choice.

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Are You A Highly Effective IT Ops Leader?

 

Pop quiz: How many of your company’s top business leaders do you talk to on a daily basis? How many know your name? And finally, how many of them do you engage to brainstorm on how to leverage the latest technologies to drive up revenues and profits?

If that was an uncomfortable test, it's time to wake up to the changing realities in today’s corporate world. If you aren’t having these types of conversations and instead your day is filled with managing the systems of record in your company, you may be on a path to corporate irrelevancy.

For the past year Forrester has been talking ad nauseam about the Empowered employee and their self-directed embrace of technology. As Forrester’s esteemed analysts on our Application Development & Delivery team have so clearly pointed out, it is these empowered employees who are creating the new systems of engagement our companies are using to reach new customers, define new workflows, and generate new revenues. And these new systems they are building are pulling away from the old systems of record – the ones you are in charge of maintaining.  

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Need Faster App Delivery?...Consider A CIS Approach

Comprehensive integration solutions (CISes) have been in the market for several years and provide robust features for solving application, B2B, and process integration challenges. But what a lot of people don't yet understand is that these tools can also dramatically speed up general-purpose application development efforts as well. Savings of 40% to 60% reduction in time and cost are frequently quoted by enterprises using a CIS for application development. How is this possible, you ask?

CIS products provide several tightly integrated components that can speed up development efforts, including:

  • A graphical environment that supports model-driven development. This approach replaces manual java coding with dynamic interpretation of java code based on process models created in either BPMN or BPEL diagrams.
  • An embedded ESB that provides out-of-the-box features supporting messaging, routing, and transaction management. ESBs can be used to minimize the creation of point-to-point integration interfaces with a more-flexible service bus approach.
  • An integration server that supports both simple and complex transformations with full support for a wide range of EDI and XML-based data formats.
  • A registry/repository for supporting the creation, management, and reuse of a wide range of application artifacts, including services.
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Is Employee MDM Ready To Take On Customer And Product?

Most master data management (MDM), data quality, and accompanying data governance efforts prioritize customer, account, and product data over all others. Certainly, industry-specific exceptions exist; for example, energy, utility, and oil and gas companies place a high priority on asset and location data domains, while investment management firms prioritize securities. But exceptions aside, a recent Forrester survey of 298 business process management (BPM) and MDM professionals across industries found that 83% prioritized customer data, 61% product data, and 53% account data. And coming in at 44%, the next highest priority: the red-headed stepchild of the MDM “party” (pun intended — apologies for that), employee data!

It’s no surprise that customer/account and product data-centric MDM programs get the lion’s share of funding, executive sponsorship, and prioritization within most organizations. This data is the lifeblood of your customer engagement and supply/distribution chain, with quantifiable impacts to both top- and bottom-line success, and can be positioned as a major competitive differentiator. But even more relevant, those MDM efforts are often driven by sales, marketing, finance, operations, or risk management functional organizations — all of which are typically better funded than many human resource (HR) teams, especially when it comes to IT budgeting. Of course, this isn’t always the case, and many large enterprises spend millions of dollars optimizing their HR systems infrastructure. Applications supporting learning management, performance and talent management, recruiting, time and attendance, benefits administration, compensation planning and analysis, and organizational charting and employee directories all require high-quality employee and organizational data.

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Holistic Integration Is Primarily About Strategy

While the increasing capability of tools to cross integration silos is a significant development, the main thrust behind holistic integration efforts inside of enterprises should be focused on bringing together the disparate integration teams (for application, B2B, process, and data integration) to create a comprehensive enterprise integration strategy and implementation plan. These teams have traditionally operated in isolation, but that has to change if we really want to make progress in improving the success of integration efforts. As the following chart shows, this process is tool agnostic.

There are many hurdles to this approach, not the least of which will be internal resistance from individual team members. However, we have spoken with a few organizations that have adopted this strategy, and they believe they are on the right track. Is your organization considering this? Does this approach make sense? Please share your thoughts.