The Big, Gray, Squishy, And Constantly Moving Line Of Social Data Privacy

Last week at Facebook's developer conference, the massive social network announced a few big changes. Loosely veiled in the enhanced features is a startling amount of new data, giving Facebook even more capabilities to track and learn from consumers sharing behavior, networks, purchases, songs they listen to, and so on.

While there were no direct announcements about what this means for marketers, it's still brought a fair amount of discussion around social marketing, customer data, and the future of consumer privacy online. Last week I tweeted a link to this summary (and pointed out the URL's passive aggressive analysis). But since then, the concerns around Facebook's use of data have only increased. So what does this mean to Customer Intelligence professionals?

The way I talk about customer privacy and social data - the information you can collect and manage from social media channels - is that it's a big, gray, squishy, and constantly moving line. It's not black and white. It's not a thin line. And the overall sentiment about how privacy online works seems to shift constantly. The best thing Customer Intelligence teams can do today is to make sure they're on the right side of that line.

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Your Common Questions On EU Privacy Regulations Answered

The security group at Forrester has been handling a steady stream of client inquiries regarding EU data privacy laws, from both EU and North America clients. While there are many good legal sources out there, we thought it'd be a good idea to compile a list of common Q&A questions about EU privacy laws into a report, to serve as a definitive information source for Forrester clients.

The report, titled: “Q&A: EU Privacy Regulations,” is now live on Forrester's website. It is not our intention, by writing this report, to give legal advice. Rather, we envisioned this report to be a repository of the most important information regarding EU privacy laws, updated every 18 months or so. The report has a wealth of information, including links to actual information sources – be that EU's data protection directive web site or interesting studies/analysis done by external parties. For example, one noteworthy study on US Safe Harbor  is by Chris Connelly from Galexia consulting. He looked at 2,170 US companies that claimed to be Safe Harbor compliant. Out of these, 940 do not provide information on how to enforce individuals' rights; 388 were not even registered with the US Department of Commerce.

The report also contained information on Model Clauses and Binding Corporate Rules, for which we are beginning to see increased interest. We also discussed new and pending privacy laws in the report, including the EU “cookies” directive and EU's view on geo-location privacy.

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