Measure Software Development By Predictability, Not Just Speed

It feels as though the word "value" has appeared in more discussions about software development and delivery than in the previous two decades. We see this increased demand for immediate, tangible value across the entire range of technology producers and consumers. The dubious value of legacy applications, which have grown like kudzu, is the impetus for many painfully difficult cutting and pruning jobs within IT departments. Faster realization of value is driving more applications and infrastructure into the cloud. Software vendors are realizing that, while revenue is vital, the long-term relationship with the customer depends on the mutual value that both parties think they're getting from the relationship.

If we measure software by value, instead of cost, revenue, completeness, or other possible measures, we have to measure the software development process in a complementary way. What characteristic of software development is most likely to generate a valuable result? If your answer is "speed," think again. Predictability is a much better measure.

At the IBM Innovate conference last month, Walker Royce made a very plausible case for valuing predictability over velocity. Here's his keynote address, which is definitely worth watching.

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Stop Wasting Money On WebLogic, WebSphere, And JBoss Application Servers

Use Apache Tomcat. It is free.

I don’t understand why firms spend millions of dollars on Java application servers like Oracle Weblogic or IBM WebSphere Application Server. I get why firms spend money on Red Hat JBoss -- they want to spend less on application servers. But, why spend anything at all? Apache Tomcat will satisfy the deployment requirements of most Java web applications.

Your Java Web Applications Need A Safe, Fast Place To Run

Most Java applications don’t need a fancy container that has umpteen features. Do you want to pay for a car that has windshield wipers on the headlights? (I wish I could afford it.) Most Java applications do not need these luxuriant features or can be designed not to need them. Many firms do, in fact, deploy enterprise-class Java web applications on Apache Tomcat. It works. It is cheap. It can save tons of dough.

Expensive Java Application Servers Sometimes Add Value

There is a need for luxury. But, you probably don’t need it to provide reliable, performant, and scalable Java web applications. Application server vendors will argue that:

  • You need an application container that supports EJBs. EJB3 fixed the original EJB debacle, but why bother? Use Spring, and you don’t need an EJB-compliant container. Many applications don’t even need Spring. EJBs are not needed to create scalable or reliable applications.
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Cisco Tweaks UCS - New Interfaces, Management Software Expand Capabilities

Not to be left out of the announcement fever that has gripped vendors recently, Cisco today announced several updates to their UCS product line aimed at easing potential system bottlenecks by improving the whole I/O chain between the network and the servers, and improving management, including:

  • Improved Fabric Interconnect (FI) – The FI is the top of the UCS hardware hierarchy, a thinly disguised Nexus 5xxx series switch that connects the UCS hierarchy to the enterprise network and runs the UCS Manager (UCSM) software. Previously the highest end FI had 40 ports, each of which had to be specifically configured as Ethernet, FCoE, or FC. The new FI, the model 6248UP has 48 ports, each one of which can be flexibly assigned as up toa 10G port for any of the supported protocols. In addition to modestly raising the bandwidth, the 6248UP brings increased flexibility and a claimed 40% reduction in latency.
  • New Fabric Extender (FEX) – The FEXC connects the individual UCS chassis with the FI. With the new 2208 FEX, Cisco doubles the bandwidth between the chassis and the FI.
  • VIC1280 Virtual Interface Card (VIC) – At the bottom of the management hierarchy the new VIC1280 quadruples the bandwidth to each individual server to a total of 80 GB. The 80 GB can be presented as up to 8 10 GB physical NICs or teamed into a pair fo 40 Gb NICS, with up to 256 virtual devices (vNIC, vHBA, etc presented to the software running on the servers.
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