Software Development And The Transparent Company (Part II)

[For the first part in this series, click here.]

Recently, I spoke with a major airline about their adoption of Agile, which they considered critical for a major customer loyalty project. Based on previous experience, the dev team expected the business users involved in this project to move slowly, so they saw Agile as a strategy for being ready to pounce on any opportunity to make progress. How slowly? The current estimation for the project's completion was....[drumroll]...five years. Now that's a customer loyalty program ensured to be left with just the most loyal customers imaginable.

As hair-raising a situation as this might be, it's hardly unique. App dev teams contributing embedded software elements to hardware products must time their deliverables to arrive at key landmarks in the overall release schedule. Compliance requirements weigh down software development with extra documentation and validation. Flawed requirements force teams to go back to the drawing board. Dev managers live and die by the schedule, and there's always something that could jeopardize the schedule. Development is pretty pointless unless someone delivers the bits and bytes, but dev ops still remains a relatively mysterious and unpredictable process for dev teams, over which they have little control once they throw their code over the wall.

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