The Right Ratio For Your Content Marketing Strategy: Guiding Principle Number Three

If you’ve been reading this blog for the last two weeks, you know that we’ve covered the first two guiding principles for tech marketers: 1) Targeting and 2) Sources/Vehicles. Clearly, those are critical. Much like you’ve committed 911 to memory for emergencies and 411 to memory for directory assistance, tech marketers should memorize 3:1:1 for guiding their content strategy.

Guiding Principle Number Three: Content 3:1:1

3:1:1 is the simple but powerful ratio that should guide your content strategy. Buyers and influencers of high consideration solutions find 70% of the content they consume on their own during the buying process. 15% of the content that they consume is typically sent to them by marketers and the remaining 15% is delivered to them by sales (or an indirect sales channel).

The 70% of the content that they find on their own can take many forms. They find it via a search query, come across it while reading an online article, seek it out by coming to your website, etc. Because this percent is so great, you can’t possibly control everything they find, but you can still help them find the content. Leave “hooks” to your content in places your buyers and influencers are likely to be. Create “magnets” that draw buyers and influencers to content of your choosing.

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How Many Marketing Vehicles Do You Need? Guiding Principle Number Two

Last week I provided the first of five guiding principles for technology marketers, based on over 100,000 tech buyer interviews and countless client interactions. Now it’s time for the second guiding principle.

Guiding Principle Number Two: Marketing Vehicles

Forrester tracks the relative importance of 38 different marketing vehicles across awareness, consideration, and purchase (i.e., email, tradeshows, search, display ads, etc. I’ve included a picture of these 38 vehicles below.) It’s the tech marketer’s job, and a difficult one at that, to decide how many are actually necessary. That’s where the second guiding principle comes in: On average, 7.6 of these 38 marketing vehicles are used by a technology buyer/influencer. For example, an IT manager who is evaluating a new technology purchase will use between seven and eight different sources as he/she becomes aware of the solution, considers the solution, and makes/influences a purchase decision.   Similarly, a line-of-business professional involved in the same purchase will also use between seven and eight sources.  Since these two individuals are involved in the same purchasing decision, the sophisticated marketer should also look to determine which vehicles (sources) are shared, thus providing an opportunity for reuse and bridging the two influencers together.    

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Targeting - Guiding Principle Number One For Tech Marketers From 100,000 Customer Interviews

One of the reasons I enjoy working at Forrester is the unique opportunity to turn data into actionable insights that tech marketers can use to drive more revenue for their companies by increasing the efficiency and effectiveness of their marketing.  

Based on this data and our work with clients, five simple but powerful guiding principles have emerged around targeting, marketing vehicles, content strategy, and messaging that all tech marketers can apply. Over the next five weeks, I’ll be sharing them with you via this blog, one per week on Tuesday mornings, starting today.

Guiding Principle Number One: Targeting

 

We all know that high-consideration technology purchases at medium and large enterprises involve multiple stakeholders. However, all too often, marketers and/or sales associate a disproportionate amount of influence to one or two particular influencers; for example, the CIO or line of business (LOB) professional. The reality is that no one influencer has more than 30% of the total power through the purchase process. You must ensure that you are allocating your marketing programs proportionally across all of the appropriate influencers and that you don’t get fixated on simply engaging one or two influencers, thinking that they control all of the necessary power.

So, the next time you are deciding whom to target, remember the 30% rule — it will serve you well.

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Forrester Research Acquires Springboard Research

It is with significant pleasure and great excitement that Forrester today announced the acquisition of Springboard Research.

By acquiring Springboard, we further our commitment to serving Technology Industry leaders — especially those in the Vendor Strategy role — with rich data and in-depth analysis of key emerging markets, particularly those in Asia Pacific. Springboard builds upon our Vendor Strategy team’s mission to help our clients predict and quantify tech industry growth and disruption.

As an established brand and well-respected firm with primary offices in Singapore, New Delhi, and Beijing, Springboard’s experienced team of professionals brings valuable insight, a rich body of IP, and a culture of innovation. We are thrilled to be bringing Dane Anderson, Springboard’s CEO; Chris Perrine, Springboard’s COO; and the rest of the team into the fold. Combining Forrester and Springboard will enable us to:

  • Expand our global coverage.
  • Strengthen our presence in the region.
  • Improve our ability to support our TI clients with successfully planning, marketing, and selling globally.

Forrester’s Tech Industry clients are making decisions on when — and how — to tackle Asia Pacific and other emerging markets. The acquisition of Springboard allows us to speak with much greater depth, authority, and intimacy regarding these decisions. In keeping with our vision of “Every Leader, Every Decision,” we are now able to provide greater client value in a wider range of regions: North America, Europe, and Asia Pacific.

To learn more about this exciting development, including the establishment of a Forrester entity in mainland China, read the press release here.