Enterprise Information Security Architecture

I always have been interested in Enterprise Architecture.  Enterprise Architecture is one of those terms that security professionals hear about but do not always know how it can benefit what they do. Recently a client asked Forrester to review their information security enterprise architecture. I was both excited and pleased to do so.  One of my accomplishments is I hold a patent in software engineering for the traceability in software systems, supporting business  and IT alignment. Several colleagues and I developed an approach to use different types of models, both business and technical, to model the enterprise.  The Object Management Group at about the same time championed the notion of "Model Driven Architecture."  The premise of theses ideas is that the enterprise can be modeled and the relationships between business processes and underlying systems identifed.

Information security, focused at people, process and technology can leverage many of the techniques of the enterprise architect to evolve the security posture of the organization from its current state to a more optimized state over time.  This presents interesting opportunities for security professionals to look at their security processes and tools to determine if they are really meeting the needs of their organization.

Add to the discussion. I would like to know your thoughts on this topic.  I will be posting more over the next several weeks.

Join me at: Forrester's IT Forum 2011

Accelerate At The Intersection Of Business And Technology
North America: May 25-27, Las Vegas
EMEA: June 8-10, Barcelona 

Apple’s Latest Privacy Woes – The Price To Pay For An “Always Connected” Life?

It was revealed yesterday that iPhones/iPads (with iOS 4.0 or later) have been logging the location information of the device and storing that in a hidden file on the phone or the iPad.

This discovery, presented by researchers Alasdair Allan and Pete Warden, at the O’Reilly Where 2.0 conference this week, has sent shock waves through the high tech community. “What? This file contains my whereabouts for the past year? WTF?” was most people’s first reaction when the news broke.

Many iPhone/iPad apps have access to the geolocation of the device, but most only access it at a given point of time and do not attempt to log or create a history file of this information. The discovery that such logs exist begs the question why Apple was logging this data and whether it has any intention of utilizing the information.

I can imagine a number of reasons why Apple would want to collect this data and how they might use it. Device tracking, for instance, is a popular parental control feature that users want. Think your teenager lied to you about his/her whereabouts yesterday? No problem, just log into MobileMe and verify the location tracking information. Similarly, a credit-protection app can be instructed to report the phone’s general location at the time of a suspicious credit card transaction— if the card is used in England and the credit card owner’s phone is in Alabama, hmm… something could be amiss here.

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Information Security Metrics

Forrester receives a significant number of inquiries from clients requesting Forrester guidance on Information Security Metrics.  Chief Information Security Officers (CISOs) need new types of metrics to address economic, legal, regulatory, human resource, communication as well as traditional IT information security concerns. Security metrics must evolve to show the information security effort provides quality, efficiency, and a correlation to cost reduction and profit improvement. CISO’s need new methods for demonstrating the value they and their programs create.  Over the course of the next several months I will be working with our clients to provide additional guidance and insight into this important topic. Look for additional research from Forrester in a new information security metrics research paper series.  As these papers develop I will comment on their development as well as important issues that surface as a result.

Best,

Ed

RSA’s Acquisition Of NetWitness Validates Forrester’s NAV Concept

Today EMC’s security division RSA announced the acquisition of NAV (Network Analysis and Visibility) vendor NetWitness. Some pundits have suggested that this is a direct result of the recent breach of RSA, but Forrester has been aware that this acquisition was in the works long before the breach was known. In fact, the public announcement of the acquisition was delayed by the breach notification. It is fortuitous timing, however, as the RSA attack shows the need for improved situational awareness.

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