Reboot Your ECM Program, And Reap The Benefits

I recently joined the Content and Collaboration team at Forrester, and I was happy to see Forrester data showing that 53% of organizations are looking to expand, upgrade, or implement their Content Management solution. Over the last six weeks, I’ve taken many inquiries that dealt with organizations looking at re-evaluating ECM programs, driven by the desire to both add new functionality and extend the reach of ECM to a broader audience. ECM is clearly alive and well.

But time and again I’ve seen this problem: Companies will jump directly into the RFI/ RFP process without fully developing their strategy and road map. But skipping this important step can result in poor ECM technology selection, lack of governance, and, ultimately, failure.

A good road map will address the three classical aspects of an enterprise application implementation: People, Process, and Technology. Outlining the tasks for each area is a good start down the path of success. Here are some sample points for starting your ECM project:

  • Define your ECM Strategy – Every organization defines ECM differently. When creating a strategy, focus on gaining an understanding of your goals and objectives for implementing an ECM solution. A good example of an ECM goal is to minimize the number of versions of the same document that exist in the organization. These goals and objectives will form the basis for the project’s critical success factors.
Read more

Which Applications Should I Move To The Cloud?

Forrester took more than a thousand inquiries from clients on cloud computing in 2010, and one of the themes that kept coming up was about which applications they should plan to migrate to infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS) cloud platforms. The answer: Wrong question.

What enterprises should really be thinking about is how they can take advantage of the economic model presented by cloud platforms with new applications. In fact, the majority of applications we find running on the leading cloud platforms aren't ones that migrated from the data center but ones that were built for the cloud.

A lot of the interest in migrating applications to cloud platforms stems from the belief that clouds are cheaper and therefore moving services to them is a good cost-saving tactic. And sure, public clouds bring economies of scale shared across multiple customers that are thus unachievable by nearly any enterprise. But those cost savings aren't simply passed down. Each public cloud is in the profit-making business and thus shares in the cost savings through margin capture.

For enterprises to make the most of a public cloud platform, they need to ensure that their applications match the economic model presented by public clouds. Otherwise, the cloud may actually cost you more. In our series of reports, "Justify Your Cloud Investment" we detail the sweet spot uses of public cloud platforms that fit these new economics and can help guide you towards these cost advantages.

Read more

Categories:

The Scope of BPM Initiatives

 

Over the last few weeks, I have had a variety of conversations with clients that have centered around the scope for the term BPM. I think we all agree that BPM is not purely a technology – but how far does it go.

BPM – The Discipline

Forrester sees BPM as a broad framework of methods, approaches, techniques and technologies that support organizational change, value optimization and ongoing performance improvement. While some see BPM as a narrow technical approach, Forrester regards BPM as including a wide range of improvement methods such as Lean and Six Sigma, along with customer-centric (outside-in) engagement approaches and organizational change management – each one of these levers ties back to a flexible and adaptable enterprise architecture that implements an evolving business strategy. Such an all-encompassing approach can help focus on strategic priorities, as well as opportunities to both differentiate the value proposition, and sharpen the competitive edge.

While some would argue that Lean and Six Sigma are separate – that they are “in the business” – our research data suggests that the most successful BPM initiatives are run by the business, for the business and are of the business (to paraphrase Lincoln). Something like just 20% of BPM process improvement initiatives are run out of IT. Indeed, I would go a little further than that – BPM initiatives run out of IT are just not sustainable in the long term. If you are charged with maintaining a BPM program from within IT (perhaps running a BPM CoE), then one of your primary tasks is to a) identify and b) work with any Lean/Six Sigma programs that are out there.

BPM CoE Service Portfolio

Read more

Xerox Corp. Acquires WaterWare Internet Services : Will Have Meaning for Meaningful Use

WaterWare  will add  more software development and consulting services to Xerox  which is always a good thing but more importantly, WaterWare  has the Aquifer EHR electronic records system that helps convert paper records to electronic data. Added to Xerox's broad  document services and global reach  the combination gives Xerox strong capability in electronic health records capture and management.  Health Care Reform = as we know- is pushing providers to meet “meaningful use” guidleines which boil down to turning massive quantities of unstructured content into structured data -allowing better monitoting of patient outcomes, better access to health data for consumers, and lower administrative costs.  Could there be a stronger core competency for this company – and this combination.  I also like WaterWare as a launching point  for broader Dynamic Case Management solutions they can extend Xerox capability, using DocuShare foundation BPM and ECM components in verticals like pharmacy and order automation.   Combining WaterWare with  DocuShare makes sense to boost professional services and  system integration, but also to provide some luster to a strong product that has been a bit buried in the larger Xerox.  So, a nice pick up.

Best Practices For Influencing Business? Tips For Revitalizing IT Standards? Join Our Community Discussions!

Architects frequently tell us how much they value insights from practitioners like themselves. We at Forrester equally value these insights, as they are the foundation of our research. To serve you and us, we've launched The Forrester Community For Enterprise Architecture Professionals.

The community is open to all, whether you're a Forrester client or not. Check out the community, and you'll see conversations focused on the key challenges that you face – from influencing the thinking of your business execs to revitalizing an IT standards program to asking if application portfolio management (APM) is a responsibility of EA or the IT function supporting apps. Participating architects and Forrester analysts are sharing their perspectives – on these questions, plus other questions like the use of Wikis for architecture standards.

You can use these discussions to get better at your role – plus you'll be able to shape our research agenda by posting your questions or highlighting a topic you think demands further investigation. Our leading analysts – like Jeff Scott, Randy Heffner, Henry Peyret, Galen Schreck, and Gene Leganza – will also post the topics they are working on to get your input on them. 

Here's what you’ll find in The Forrester Community For Enterprise Architecture Professionals:

  • A simple platform on which you can pose your questions and get advice from peers who face the same business challenges.
Read more