WikiLeaks: Will The Lapses In Security Leading To Massive Data Breaches Serve As A Wakeup Call For Us?

In the past few days, almost every conversation I have had with a CISO has somehow stumbled onto the topic of the data breach at the US Department of Defense (DoD) and subsequent release of that information through WikiLeaks. Many CISOs have told us that their executives are asking for reassurances that this type of large-scale data disclosure is not possible in their organization. Some executives have even asked the security team to provide presentations to management educating them on their existing security controls against similar attacks. Responding to these questions is tricky: “It’s like treading on a thin ice,” commented one CISO. If you tell them everything is under control you may create a false sense of security. If you tell them that it is very likely that such an incident can happen within their organization – it may be a career limiting move.

I would recommend giving the executives a dose of reality. I do many security assessments for our clients and often find that many organizations are solely relying too much on technology and infrastructure protections they have. Today’s reality is very different. We often operate in a global context with large and complex IT environments making it hard to monitor and track data and we are sharing a tremendous amount of sensitive information with business partners and third parties. All of these realities were faced by the US government as well and probably all contributed to the circumstances that led to the disclosure of data.

 As many of you try to extract the lessons learned from this episode, here is my take on it – It is a failure of not a single security control but a set of multiple preventative and detective lapses.

Failure of preventative controls: Governance, Oversight and Access Control

Read more

HP Misses Opportunity With Watercooler — Organizations Need To Embrace And Foster Groundswell Technologies

Updated: December 13, 2010

Michael Brzozowski, the creator of Watercooler, the internal social media system for HP, recently left HP for Google.

Talents move around all the time, especially in the bay area where the industry is rife with interesting opportunities. However, in this case, the departure of Mr. Brzozowski has put the fate of the Watercooler system in question.

To understand why this is worth blogging, we need to first understand what the Watercooler system is about. Many of you may not know this, but Watercooler is a social media system that currently has 100,000 users! Brzozowski originally started Watercooler aggregate RSS feeds from across the company. Over time, it has morphed into a social media aggregation platform that aggregates content from  HP’s internal wikis, microblogs, various discussion forums, and social bookmarks. The system has a documented set of open APIs and supports a powerful and expressive set of content filters across different social media systems. It is also integrated with HP’s user directories.   

Brzozowski wrote a nice paper on a study he conducted with Watercooler data. Published in Group 2009, the study revealed some interesting facts about social media usage inside HP. Perhaps one of the most concrete statistics arguing for the value of enterprise social networks to date, Brzozowski’s paper points out that 69% of all Watercooler blog users subscribe to content generated by someone outside their business unit. This kind of cross-company instant collaboration is a huge benefit as a social media system because it provides a user community.  

Read more

In 2011 The GRC Market Will Grow 20%, Driven More By Breadth Than Maturity

On the heels of Forrester's GRC Market Overview last month, this week we published my Governance, Risk, And Compliance Predictions: 2011 And Beyond report. Based on our research with GRC vendors, buyers, and users, this paper highlights the aggressive regulatory environment and greater attention to risk management as drivers for change. Specifically, here is a brief summary of the top five trends we will see next year:

  • Increasing vendor competition will continue to bring more choices and more confusion. Strong market growth will encourage more technology and service vendors to get into the market, which means the fragmentation (which I've discussed previously) and confusion will continue.

Read more