The Data Digest: How Consumers Complain About Poor Service

Last week my colleague Andrew McInnes blogged about his report "How Consumers Complain About Poor Service",  in which he analyzed Forrester’s Technographics® data to find out how consumers provide feedback about bad service experiences.

His big takeaway is that consumers are still much more likely to provide feedback directly to companies through more traditional channels (like surveys, phone calls, email, and postal mail) than provide feedback through social channels. More specifically, 71% of US consumers who had unsatisfactory service interactions in the past 12 months provided feedback through at least one traditional channel (including email), while only 16% provided feedback through any of the social channels we asked about.

Despite the buzz around social media, this data shows that the majority of customer feedback comes directly to companies via surveys, phone, and email. Organizations should implement sophisticated voice-of-the-customer programs that use text analytics and other technologies to mine this information to better understand customers' needs and the issues they're dealing with, identify best practices, and come up with improvements whenever possible.

Survey: Where Do You Turn For Professional News And Insight?

Forrester would like to know what sources you turn to for the information and insights you need for your job and career.  Could you please take a brief and anonymous survey to share the publications, sites, blogs and Twitter accounts you find essential to your job and career?  The survey is only five questions and should require less than four minutes to complete.

We'll share some of your top choices here on the Forrester blog, provided we get a sufficient number of responses.  Thanks for your time and information!

You can complete the survey below or click here to complete the survey.

 

Create your free online surveys with SurveyMonkey, the world's leading questionnaire tool.

Facebook And MySpace Collaborate - What It Means (And Doesn't)

Today, Facebook and MySpace announced a collaboration.  MySpace users can now log in using Facebook and leverage their collection of Facebook "Likes" to instantly create a highly personalized entertainment experience on MySpace.  On the one hand, this is hardly earth-shattering news: MySpace already announced and launched its new entertainment-focused mission, and Facebook has been integrated into more than 1 million Web sites.  But that doesn't mean there isn't anything interesting about today's news:

  • MySpace is reinvigorated and innovating rapidly.  For a site that hadn't changed much in years, MySpace is suddenly looking awfully innovative. Of course, it needs to be; News Corp. has made it clear that MySpace quickly must demonstrate success, and MySpace is taking this challenge very seriously. In the past three weeks, MySpace has announced its new format, launched it and already rolled out its first major innovation with a partner.
     
Read more

QuickenLoans and OpinionLab Show How Data Integration Can Solve Real-World Web Site Problems

OpinionLab hosted a Webinar today where QuickenLoans – a leading direct lender in the United States - spoke about their voice of the customer (VOC) program and how they have integrated VOC into their existing processes.

One of the most interesting elements of the presentation in my view was where QuickenLoans discussed how they had integrated OpinionLab with Tealeaf to provide an unprecedented view into Web site visitors and activity.

Before I get into that, let me first explain what each of these vendors do:

OpinionLab: OpinionLab provides functionality to capture customer feedback on Web sites. QuickenLoans uses the service in several locations on their Web site and in several points in key processes.

Here is the QuickenLoans home page with a link to a customer feedback form:

The feedback form is powered by OpinionLab:

Tealeaf: Tealeaf provides a solution that records the activities and movement of Web site visitors in a way that allows clients to “playback” visitor sessions to better understand why a particular problem occurred.

Read more

The State Of Online Testing 2010

After keeping busy all summer and early fall with client meetings, events, and absorbing repeated acquisition announcements, it's great to be home again and conducting research!

Most notably, my latest round of research on the topic of online testing, titled "The State of Online Testing 2010," published this week.  This document is the output of a survey conducted with online testing users alongside the "The Forrester Wave™: Online Testing, Q3 2010" research process.

As you may be aware I'm a huge proponent of online testing.  I think it is an underutilized and highly effective site optimization tool, with a wide array of applications.  I frequently find myself uttering the rallying cry "Test, Test, and Test some more!" and I often refer to online testing as the wind tunnel of site optimization, a contained and structured environment for evaluating the content, promotions, and customer experience components of the online marketing mix.

Windtunnel

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Image source: www.carbodydesign.com)

What did we learn about the state of online testing? The report showcases the data in it's full glory, but here are some highlights:

Read more

Disruptive Renewal

This morning I had the privilege of keynoting Forrester’s EMEA Marketing and Strategy Forum.

My keynote introduced a new stream of research we’re developing in the Consumer Product Strategy role: Disruptive Renewal.  We also today published our first report on the topic, which Forrester clients can download here.

The basic principle of Disruptive Renewal is that connected device adoption and the broader digitization process are permanently and irrevocably changing the way in which customers interact with products and services. Media industries were on the bleeding edge of these trends, causing what we have called the Media Meltdown, a painful transition that put audiences in control and permanently disrupted media company business models and products.

It is now clear that the same digitization process will eventually transform all industries, that companies lose control of their customers when new technology enables them to interact with products on their own terms.  Revenues are threatened. Either these companies harness the technology to build new products and services or they fail. 

We call this process Disruptive Renewal, and though it often happens swiftly, it doesn’t happen at once.  Instead it falls into three key stages (see graphic below):

Disruptive Empowerment: when new technology enables customers to make choices about how they interact with products.  Think, the rise of the Internet, of home broadband, of smartphones, of the iPad.

Read more

The New Rules Of Marketing: Introducing The Five Habits Of Adaptive Marketers

I recently interviewed a top marketing executive who summed up her journey to becoming a digital-era marketer by saying, “If you feel comfortable, you’re not transforming.” It might sound cliche, but today's most successful marketers are wholeheartedly embracing the "no pain, no gain" mentality.

Unfortunately, the story for most marketers goes more like "all pain, no gain." Over the past six months, I’ve listened to countless marketing executives explain that despite all of the heartache they are enduring, they don’t feel like they are making much progress. In fact, in a recent study by Accenture Interactive, only 4% of marketing leaders feel that they are very prepared to exploit digital marketing opportunities.

So, what’s the problem? In short, marketers are stuck in a world between the old rules and the new rules. To deal with the new rules of changing media, technology, and consumer behavior, many marketers delegate emerging marketing solutions to a handful of external partners or internal "experts." In doing so, they have enabled the rest of the organization to behave much like it did 10 years ago, clinging to the old rules. And until marketers reconcile their internal organizations, they will be fighting a long, painful battle to survive.

To Avoid Extinction, Marketers Must Replace The Bad Habits Of Traditional Marketing With The Habits Of Adaptive Marketing

After interviewing more than 20 of the most successful marketing executives and thought leaders from around the world, Forrester has learned what marketers must do in order to evolve as a species and avoid extinction. We call it Adaptive Marketing — “a flexible approach in which marketers respond quickly to their environment to align consumer and brand goals and maximize return on brand equity.”

Read more

Top 10 Web Design Fixes For Improving Business Results Workshop (December 7th, San Francisco, CA)

Even the best Web sites have usability flaws that stop customers from buying products or services, finding information, and getting help. Yet many of these problems are easy to find and not much harder to fix — if you know what to look for. And the benefits of fixing these common usability problems can be huge.

If you are looking for a fast, objective way to spot the common — but serious — design problems that hurt online business performance, please join me in San Francisco on Tuesday, December 7th, for Forrester’s Top 10 Web Design Fixes For Improving Business Results Workshop.

This one-day intensive session helps participants uncover 10 Web design problems that afflict more than half of the 1,200+ sites tested by Forrester, are easy to spot, and produce ROI when fixed. During this Workshop, participants will learn and apply the same objective techniques Forrester analysts use to find well-known usability problems for research and for clients. These methods apply to any type of site, including B2C or B2B Web sites, extranets, and intranets.

This promises to be an educational, interactive, and entertaining way to learn the tools that will help you find and fix problems that frustrate your customers and limit your business performance. For more information, and a detailed agenda, please visit the event page.

On The Certain Economics Of Relegating Paper Books To The Margins Of The Business

Time to get my hands a bit dirty. Last week I posted an eBook forecast with a brief explanation of why the book business may complete its digital revolution more quickly than other media businesses have. Turns out this assertion was more difficult to hear than I anticipated and I got some very insistent (and worth reading) comments. The discussion that ensued both on the blog and outside of it was very complex, this is not a simple matter. However, there are parts of it that are very simple that I have to clarify, even though it means rolling up my sleeves a bit. Allow me to draw into this discussion John Thompson of Cambridge University who gave a very worthwhile interview to the Brooklyn Rail this month to discuss his recently published analysis of the book industry,  Merchants of Culture. I will refer to just one of his specific comments:

"There are many people who just love books and they love the ideas that are expressed in books; they love the stories that are told through books and all of it. They’re very attached to it.... They cherish the book. And they believe that this is an artifact that they want in their lives. And some of the technological commentators in this industry just completely miss this point."

Read more

How Zappos Brought Me Back To Forrester

In 2008, after nearly four years as an analyst on Forrester’s Customer Experience team, I left to explore the world of the Mad Men. I led the interaction design team at a top-20 advertising agency in Boston and, after a move to San Francisco, advised marketing agencies on things like their corporate strategies and go-to-marketing messaging.

While it was an exciting time for me, I kept coming back to a belief that I’ve held for years: A great customer experience is truly the best marketing.

And then I read Tony Hsieh’s Delivering Happiness, the story of Zappos’ rise to one of the best-known (and, some could argue, most successful) customer-centric companies. I devoured the entire book, cover to cover, on a flight from JFK to SFO. I dog-eared pages and highlighted passages. I even ignored a really great in-flight episode of 30 Rock in order to keep reading. And as we pulled into the gate in San Francisco, I realized that I needed to return to my passion: customer experience. Ultimately, what really makes me happy is helping companies make their customers happy.

And so here I am. (Thanks, Tony!)

I’m thrilled to be back on Harley’s team and doing a job I love. Here are the types of things I’ll be exploring through my research:

Read more