Java Is A Dead-End For Enterprise App Development

Before Java was invented, one of the key industry trends was to increase the productivity of both developers and end users. For example, fourth-generation programming languages (4GL) such as Powerbuilder, Progress, and Uniface provided professional developers with faster ways to develop business applications than using COBOL, Pascal, C, or C++. For end users, tools such as Dbase, Lotus Notes, and Visicalc provided them with the unprecedented ability to create mini-apps without the need for professional developers. In the early '90s, this productivity trend was thrown into a tizzy by the Internet. Now, software vendors and enterprise application developers had to rush to write a whole new generation of applications for the Web or risk becoming irrelevant. The Internet forced developer productivity and 4GL’s to take the back seat.

Java Was At The Right Place At The Right Time For Web Applications

Java was designed in 1990 as an easier and more portable option than C++ to develop embedded systems.  The invention of the WWW in 1993 started a meteoric change in IT application development. Sun Microsystems moved quickly to take advantage by selling “network” servers like hotcakes and offering Java as the platform for Web development. Most other software vendors were caught off guard and Java became the de facto Internet development standard for enterprise Web application development.

Fast-Forward 20 Years

Read more

Categories:

A Good Customer Service Experience Is Easier Said Than Done

Customers today are empowered. They want to decide how they interact with companies that they do business with. That means that not only does a company need to provide the goods and services but also the tools and culture to make customer service a value-add to their customer base.  

Here are some basic but key steps to take to move in that direction.

Know Your Customer

When a customer contacts a company, agents should have full access to the customer’s information. They should be able to view past and pending requests made across all available communication channels that you support (like the phone, email, chat, SMS) as well as interactions over social channels like Twitter and Facebook.

If a request has been escalated from a Web self-service session, agents should have access to the full session history so as not to repeat questions or searches that the customers has already performed.

Couple Your CRM System With Others

CRM systems should be more than just the front end of a database of customer information and cases — they should also be integrated with back-office applications. Real-time data integration means that the system can make calls to third-party systems to retrieve a real-time answer to a question such as “When did my order ship?”

Some companies deeply couple knowledge management with CRM. While agents are gathering the details of the customer’s issue, under-the-covers searches are being executed so that an updated list of relevant solutions can be presented to the agent, which helps minimize handle time.

Make Search Smart

Read more

Looking For EA Or BA Marketing Best Practices

If you have an enterprise or business architecture marketing program or well-defined marketing methodology, Forrester would like to talk with you about a potential case study.  

I am initiating a research project on marketing the enterprise architecture (EA) and business architecture (BA) practices. This research will examine how EA and BA practices are promoting their value to their IT and business constituents and explore the best ways to engage and influence architecture’s stakeholders. This research aims to illuminate best practices that can guide enterprise architects in designing a marketing program that can successfully engage the larger organization and develop support for EA and BA initiatives.

The questions this research will answer:

  • What are the factors to consider when developing a marketing initiative?
  • What are the typical goals of EA and BA marketing initiatives?
  • What marketing approaches work best?
  • What types of marketing artifacts resonate well with stakeholders?
  • Who are the best targets for a marketing campaign?
  • How do you know if your marketing efforts are paying off?

If you have a good story about your marketing practices, please contact Kim Naton at knaton@forrester.com.

Or - if you just have a good marketing idea, leave a comment.

Governing Large Implementation Projects: Execution Is Key -- Findings From Forrester's Recent Sourcing Forum

We met with 30 Sourcing & Vendor Management Professionals during an action session at Forrester’s Sourcing & Vendor Management Forum in Chicago to discuss how to improve governance for large implementation projects. Clients were looking for help across the sourcing life cycle – from determining who manages the RFP process, to determining scope with internal stakeholders, to driving governance after the contract is signed.

What tactics are Sourcing & Vendor Management Professionals using to tackle these challenges?

1. Renegotiate rates with current players. Forrester’s recent survey found that 68% of organizations are renegotiating with their existing suppliers. One attendee said, “This has always been a priority, now we are bringing more efficiency and innovation to the process.”

2. Drive innovation from vendors. Everyone wants innovation from their suppliers but few receive it.  Attendees shared tips for how they overcome major hurdles to achieving this in their supplier relationships:

a. Define what you mean by innovation. Many struggle to get innovation from their providers because they haven’t defined what that means — are you looking for idea-sharing or process improvements? Determine which type of innovation you need and communicate that to your vendor.

b. Identify metrics. “It’s not just how you measure innovation; it’s how you measure successful innovation.” Clients shared a variety of metrics such as:

i. Requiring the vendor to submit continuous improvement ideas they agree are impactful to your organization

ii. Number of ideas submitted for approval

iii. Number approved

iv.  ROI of implemented idea

Read more

Oracle Exadata - Usability For Multiple Applications

In a recent blog post I wrote as a summary of the goings-on from Oracle OpenWorld this year, I said, "Oracle needs to enable consolidation of multiple applications on Exadata instances to make it more useful." Since that post, Oracle has contacted me stating that they, in fact, do currently enable consolidation of multiple applications within a single Exadata instance. According to Oracle:

"Based on what I am hearing from production customers, I believe that most or more likely all OLTP customers are running more than one application on an Exadata Database Machine in order to get better system utilization. Even the smaller quarter rack is simply too powerful for a single application. XXXX, XXXX, XXXX XXXX, and XXXX are examples of customers having multiple applications on a single Exadata Database Machine. This InformationWeek article, "Oracle Exadata V2 Customer Tells All," discusses how BNP moved 35 applications to an Exadata half rack.

 Note that Exadata is based on proven Oracle RAC technology, which has been used to consolidate multiple applications to a single RAC cluster since 2001

We also have customers that are running DW and OLTP on the same Database Machine, including: 

XXXX XXXX – runs DW and OLTP on the same Database Machine “Deployed Oracle Exadata Half Rack to improve data warehousing and online transaction processing, which is essential to factoring interest rates and processing loans.”

Read more

What Does The Novell Acquisition Mean To You?

According to press releases here and here, Attachmate is acquiring Novell in a US $2.2 billion transaction. As an infrastructure and operations or security professional with investments in either company, when you see a headline like this, you'll wonder, "What does that mean to me?" Understanding the implications of acquisitions is a task that's getting harder and harder, particularly when the two players each have broad product portfolios with some overlap. I've gathered feedback and worked with my colleagues Eveline Oehrlich, Jean-Pierre Garbani, John Kindervag, Glenn O’Donnell, Jonathan Penn, and Galen Schreck to synthesize and discuss what this means to customers. Here's our take:

First, Novell brings with it about $1 billion in cash, so the net purchase price is roughly $1.2 billion, not $2.2 billion. Combine that with the ~$450 million from CPTN Holdings LLC, a consortium of tech companies organized by Microsoft, and there's far fewer actual dollars in play than it appears. Attachmate states that it intends to keep Novell and SUSE as two separate operating units. Forrester believes that in the long term, SUSE might be attractive to a number of vendors. IBM and HP are likely suitors, but we wouldn't rule out a dark horse like Cisco or Oracle. For more on this, check out Rich Fichera's blog post.

Read more

Strong Growth And Innovation Seen For Information-As-A-Service In 2011

Over the course of this year, I’ve spoken with many organizations that are continuing to expand their usage of information-as-a-service (sometimes called data services) to support new business requirements such as self-service customer portals, real-time BI, and single-version-of-the-truth. With the growing complexity of data, increasing volume of data, and exploding security challenges all driving demand, IaaS is poised to grow significantly in the coming years, especially as existing integration technologies are failing to meet these new requirements. What we see is that most organizations that have embraced an IaaS strategy over the years aren’t looking back; they’re continuing to expand its usage to support more requirements such as real-time data, creating data domains, improving the ability to securely deliver information, integration with unstructured data and external sources, various Web portals, and enterprise search.

Recently, my colleague Gene Leganza, who serves Enterprise Architecture Professionals, compiled the top 15 technology trends EA should watch over the next three years . One of the trends Gene highlighted is that information-as-a-service (IaaS) is finding a broader audience. I see more organizations continuing to show strong interest in IaaS, as evidenced by increasing inquiries, to help with growing data integration challenges that traditional solutions are not addressing. IaaS can significantly alter IT’s approach to its data management strategy and delivers a flexible framework to support transactional, BI, and real-time data.

Here are my top predictions for 2011 related to IaaS:

Read more

An Impressive Keynote From SAP’s Co-CEO Opens SAP’s UK And Ireland User Conference

I attend several software company customer events each year, and I always feel like the only atheist in a room full of religious zealots. However big or small the vendor, whether it consistently delivers competitive advantage or overcharges for mediocre software, the people who come to the events are usually fans — people whose careers depend on their employer continuing to invest in the product they know.

The SAP UK user conference today in Manchester was no different. So when Jim Hageman Snabe stood up to deliver his keynote, this wasn’t the toughest crowd he’s ever faced. Whatever their concerns about product strategies, support costs, court cases, etc., these people are desperate for him to do well, because otherwise they are out of a job.

Nonetheless, even heretics like me would have to admit that JHS delivered a great keynote. Even Ruby Wax, the Anglo-American comedienne compere was moved to say “you could sell anything.” Here are some of the things that particularly impressed me:

·         Likeability. From linking his speech to Ruby’s opening routine, to funny and pertinent family stories, JHS showed what sort of person he is. This is very different from his predecessors and competitors. When he says he wants SAP to be more customer-focused, it’s clear that he means it.

·         Clarity. JHS set out simply and effectively where he wants SAP to focus its development. He set out six themes: quality first, stabilize the core, reduce TCO, innovate without disruption, improve usability, give customers predictability. Then he explained succinctly how SAP is addressing each one, in parallel with its vision for in-memory computing, on demand availability, and mobile device usability. Even if you disagree with his vision, you’re in no doubt what it is.

Read more

Miss Our Webinar "Building High-Performance Developer Teams"? Go To This Download Site!

From its birth as one of the highest-rated track sessions at IT Forum earlier this year to its recent publication as the Forrester report "Best Practices: Building High-Performance Application Development Teams," Jeffrey Hammond's research on the techniques that leading development shops use to drive their success has been wowing application development professionals.

Are you facing this challenge? Are your business stakeholders demanding faster delivery of more innovation? Is the software you deliver increasingly vital to the success of your business? Then you should download the content from this recent event:

Webinar: "Building High-Performance Developer Teams"
Hosted by: Jeffrey Hammond, Principal Analyst, and Mike Gilpin, VP and Research Director
Duration: 1 hour

Click Here To Download...

Description: Replay this Webinar to:

  • Learn how to adjust your recruiting practices to attract the right creative professionals for your team.
  • Understand what creates an intrinsically motivating culture for developers.
  • Discover how best to manage your teams with a streamlined set of Lean software development practices that maximize creative “flow.”
  • See what “next practices” are emerging in the most advanced shops to further drive breakthrough performance.

Please listen to our session; Jeffrey and I look forward to the opportunity to share our research with you in the future and to help you apply these learnings in your shop.

Regards,
Mike Gilpin
VP/Research Director
Forrester Research

Checking In With Cisco UCS – Continued Momentum, Decoupled From Corporate Malaise

I met recently with Cisco’s UCS group in San Jose to get a quick update on sales and maybe some hints about future development. The overall picture is one of rapid growth decoupled from whatever pressures Cisco management has cautioned about in other areas of the business.

Overall, according to recent disclosure by Cisco CEO John Chambers, Cisco’s UCS revenue is growing at a 550% Y/Y growth rate, with the most recent quarterly revenues indicating a $500M run rate (we make that out as about $125M quarterly revenue). This figure does not seem to include the over 4,000 blades used by Cisco IT, nor does it include units being consumed internally by Cisco and subsequently shipped to customers as part of appliances or other Cisco products. Also of note is the fact that it is fiscal Q1 for Cisco, traditionally its weakest quarter, although with an annual growth rate in excess of 500% we would expect that UCS sequential quarters will be marching to a totally different drummer than the overall company numbers.

Read more