In The Tech Industry, Complex Is A Polite Word For Fat

Ever since I got an iPad, I've been eager for the update to the upgrade to the iOS4 operating system that premiered on the iPhone months ago. The ease of use of the iPad erodes, grain by grain, with each app that you add to it, as long as you're forced to keep sweeping across page after page of apps. Organizing apps into functional groups across pages is a tedious process. After a while, you really feel the need for folders to organize your apps more effectively.

Imagine my disappointment, therefore, when iTunes froze as soon as I launched it. It was the start of yet another chapter in the story of my hate-hate relationship with iTunes, because of its unstoppable bloat and accompanying seizures. With every major update, iTunes grows another layer of fat, causing more frequent electronic coronaries when it needs to run (or waddle) through its paces. I can't say I was surprised that iTunes froze, forcing me to reinstall it (the software equivalent of sending someone to fat camp?) before I could get it working again.

Here, from a single company, on a single desktop, is the history of the tech industry's problems with complexity. A device that is consummately simple to use, the iPad, is handcuffed, like a slender Sidney Poitier to a morbidly obese Tony Curtis, to iTunes. As Apple keeps jamming more of its business plan, in the form of new features (Genius, Ping, etc.) and new content (anything that could be described as "released" or "published"), iTunes swells to ever-increasing levels of complexity. 

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Why The Beatles On iTunes Really Isn't A Big Deal

[Disclaimer: I’m going to spend as many (i.e., few) words writing about this development as it deserves.]

So finally Apple gets the Beatles catalogue Steve Jobs has been pining for.

Thank goodness that is out of the way; now we can focus on important developments.

The fact that securing the content of a band old enough to be most young music fans’ grandfathers (and some) is a sad reflection of the state of the digital music market.

Yes, it will be a success. Yes, we’ll have numerous Beatle #1’s (probably including at Christmas).  But that’s just further depressing evidence of the old geezer skew of digital music buyers.

The digital music market (and the young music fans that record labels desperately need to get engaged) needs new music products, not yesteryear’s hits repackaged.

So, congratulations Steve on finally getting your Beatles catalogue; now can you please turn your attention to innovating your digital music services.

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For those of you who have come here to defend the fab four's musical legacy I am reposting my comment from deep in the midst of the comment torrent...

 

To be clear...

...my blog post is not about the Beatles, it is about the digital music market. (Some of you did pick up on this).

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