Already Marketing On Social Networks? Then You're Already Marketing On Mobile

One of the reasons marketing on social networks is so popular is that the consumers a brand can reach are largely active, vocal and willing to connect -- with each other and with their favorite brands.  But did you know that 22% of US online adults with cellphones access their social networks via mobile at least monthly?   In my new report, I explore research that shows that these particular social networking users are even more active, vocal and willing to connect than the general population.

Consumers who access social networks via mobile over-index on every rung of the Social Technographics® ladder, except for inactives.  More interesting?  Mobile social users have specific, focused intentions that differ from desktop mobile users:  They're interested in immediacy, entertainment, and in knowing which of their friends and favorite places are physically nearby. 

Keeping in mind the specific interests of these extremely socially active consumers, marketers can optimize their already-existing social campaigns to make them even more successful for mobile users.  For recommendations on how to optimize your own campaigns with little additional effort or cost, check out the full report.

Have you already optimized your social messaging for mobile users?  If so, I'd love to hear what you changed and what the results were.  Head to the comments section to share your case studies!

Bing's New Social Search A First Tiny Step Toward A Giant Future

Today’s Bing news is very interesting, not because the new functionality that Microsoft and Facebook announced is terribly powerful, but because it demonstrates how the next great evolution of search will occur.  In brief, Bing announced two new ways it is introducing social data into its search results:

  • Enhancing results with Facebook Likes:  If you search on Bing and your Facebook friends have "liked" something related to your search term, you will see those "likes" highlighted within your search results.  The idea behind this functionality is that something your friend "likes" will be more interesting to you than other search results.
     
  • Facebook profile search:  Bing reports that more than 4% of searches are for people. Of course, trying to find a particular Bob Smith can be a challenge, which is why Bing will utilize your Facebook network to help you find the Bob Smith that is most likely the one you seek. 
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Three Biases That Prevent Social Media Gurus From Objectively Evaluating New Social Tools

Yesterday Facebook released new tools to help improve users’ control of Facebook sharing and data.  The reaction to these new tools has been generally very positive (and, in my opinion, deservedly so).  But there's been some interesting buzz among social media gurus, particularly about problems with the new Facebook Groups functionality.  These gripes seem to be based less on a consideration of how the average consumer will use Groups than on a set of use cases and problems unique to social media professionals.  In short, I worry social media specialists are making the classic mistake that trips up marketers time and again: You are not the target market!

I believe there are three reasons that social media professionals may end up judging new tools based on their biases and not upon the potential use and adoption by the average consumer.  These reasons are:

  • Social media professionals are Creators and Conversationalists: Creators create the content that others consume in social venues, and Conversationalists post frequent status updates. Social media professionals are (not surprisingly) big Creators and Conversationalists, but the average consumer is not--fewer than one in four online adults in the US have Creator behaviors and fewer than one in three are Conversationalists. 
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Welcome To The New Facebook: What Facebook's New Features Mean

Welcome to the new Facebook.  No, I don't mean Facebook the social network, although today's changes do represent some exciting new capabilities for Facebook users. Instead, I mean Facebook the company.  The organization that today announced new features seems a different Facebook than the one we’ve seen in the past.  Today’s Facebook is one committed to transparency and user control and mindful of its increasingly vital and high-profile position within people's communications and lives.

By now you may have heard of (or seen) the new features Facebook announced at its press event this morning. Here is a brief summary:

  • Download Your Info: You can download a copy of everything you’ve ever posted to Facebook. Go to “Account: Account Settings” in the upper right hand corner of your Facebook page to access this new feature. As an extra security measure, you will be asked to authenticate yourself before downloading your data as a ZIP file.  This file will contain your posts, pictures, list of friends, events, notes and more (see Figure 1).
     
  • Applications You Use: To date, once you allowed a third-party application to access your Facebook data, you had no ability to see what personal data was transferred and had few options to manage the application permissions.  Facebook is now offering greater transparency and control over this data sharing. Go to “Account: Privacy” in the upper right hand corner of your Facebook page, then click “edit settings” to review the applications you have authorized.  You can see the data each application has accessed; if you are unhappy with the amount of personal information provided, you may easily remove optional permissions for an application or deauthorize it completely from accessing your data (see Figure 2).
     
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Livetweeting From Facebook Event: 10/6/10

Barring any unforeseen technical difficulties, I'll be livetweeting from the Facebook press event tomorrow, October 6, 2010.  Facebook hasn't said what the event is about, but speculation is circulating about a Skype integration, an evite-like event feature, Facebook credits or enhanced social gaming. 

If you're curious, follow me on Twitter (@augieray) or watch the widget below for a live feed of tweets from Facebook in Palo Alto, Calif.  The event is scheduled to begin at 10:30 am PDT/1:30 pm PDT.

If the widget below doesn't update, come join me on Twitter.

 

Why You Shouldn't Hire A Social Media Agency Of Record

Social media may be the biggest agency land grab ever. Interactive agencies, PR agencies, creative agencies, media agencies, direct agencies, and even specialty search, mobile, and obviously social are getting into the game. Of course this is driven by client demand.  The massive adoption of social technologies has driven many marketers to rethink their approach while moving at least experimental dollars and resources toward social media. And given how fast things move today, they often look to their agency partners for advice, education, and execution. Over the past year we’ve had a lot of questions from marketers seeking a “social media agency of record” to manage all social media marketing activity. My response to this has been straightforward: Don’t do it.

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Identifying — And Defeating — Social Clutter

Something amazing has happened to social media in the past couple of years: Overall adoption of social technologies has effectively reached saturation. We're now at the point where more than 80% of US online users engage with social media - and although there's been some hand-wringing over the fact social media adoption has plateaued at that level, let's keep things in perspective: 80% engage with social media! That's as many people as own a DVD player or use SMS.

This kind of scale gives marketers the potential to generate reach through social media. Sure, it's a new and unfamiliar kind of reach for many marketers - rather than just shouting uniform messages at millions of people, they must engage directly with their audiences and then hope those audiences turn around and talk to and influence millions more users. But as we've proven, this new model of reach can also provide the same kind of massive scale that the old reach models did: Just a tiny handful of Mass Connectors will create 256 billion influence impressions in the US this year.

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What The Social Network Will Mean To Facebook And Mark Zuckerberg: A Film Review And Analysis

After months of anticipation and speculation, The Social Network has finally arrived in theaters.  In advance of the opening, many people wondered “could (the) film  affect Facebook's brand?” and it was said that “inside Facebook, they think the movie will not be good for Mark's image, and that worries them." It is easy to understand these questions and concerns considering how Mark Zuckerberg and the early days of Facebook are portrayed in the film, but having seen it for myself, my strong belief is that The Social Network will have no impact on people’s perception of Facebook.

In many ways, The Social Network is as much about Facebook as Titanic is about the White Star Line.  Certain aspects of the film’s fact-based but fictionalized plot may reflect badly on Facebook in a vague sort of way, but as with any great movie (and The Social Network is a great movie), the viewer is swept up in the human emotion of the story.  In a world filled with real-life cautionary social media horror stories of people losing their jobs, their marriages or their lives, the tale of how a few geeks and freaks got caught up in an entrepreneurial frenzy, cheated each other, and destroyed their friendships is hardly an indictment of Facebook.

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Are Nokia's Ovi Services Gaining Momentum?

Because of poor execution in 2009, the industry consensus — particularly in the US, where Nokia has a small footprint — was that Nokia was not in a position to catch up with the Apple App Store or Android Market. Reports of the Ovi Store’s death were greatly exaggerated: Nokia simply cannot afford to fail. On the contrary, it is now catching up, particularly in emerging countries, where Nokia clearly differentiates thanks to its unique local presence and relationships with operators (mobile billing is currently supported in around 30 countries).

Nokia just issued a press release this morning insisting that Ovi Store downloads are now reaching 2.3 million per day for a total installed base of 140 million active users. Bear in mind that a user is considered active on a six-month period and that this figure includes multiple Ovi experiences, including the 17 million Ovi mail and chat users as well as users of Ovi Maps, Ovi music, and Ovi life tools.

That's an increase versus last May (1.7 million) and versus the data that was announced at Nokia World two weeks ago (2 million). More interestingly, 200,000 people are signing up daily to Ovi. That's a significant trend.

I'll stick to my initial thoughts about Nokia's transformation journey: the challenge is still to offer a fully integrated Ovi brand experience.

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Forrester’s Consumer Forum: I’ll Be There . . . Will You?

Forrester’s Consumer Forum is less than a month away.  I am very much looking forward to the forum and wanted to call your attention to this worthy industry event. 

I’ve been involved with the development of the Interactive Marketing track, and the topics and speakers we’ve arranged will be interesting and informative. I’ll be presenting about Social Media Marketing ROI and the Balanced Scorecard. Melissa Parrish will lead an excellent panel on how marketers can empower employees throughout the enterprise with social media; her panel includes leaders from Dell, salesforce.com, and IBM.  Forrester’s Joanna O’Connell will present new data and guidance on how marketers are improving their online ad targeting versus the same old “Spray and Pray” approach.  And Zena Weist of H&R Block will share how her organization changed strategic direction from a social media marketing push mentality to addressing client needs in the social sphere.

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