The Data Digest: How Do LATAM Consumers Feel About PC Security?

Ever wondered how consumers in emerging markets feel about online security? Forrester Technographics® tracks this kind of information in 17 countries worldwide, including China, India, Brazil, and Mexico. We found, for example, that in Latin America there are huge differences between Mexico and Brazil: 65% of Mexican PC owners are concerned that their PCs will become infected with malware, compared with 48% of Brazilians. However, Brazilian PC owners are much more hesitant to share any information online. Ninety-three percent of Mexican PC owners and 95% of Brazilian PC owners use some form of security measure on their home PCs.

Although Mexican PC owners are more concerned about malware and are more likely to share personal details online, they do less to protect themselves than Brazilian PC owners: They’re significantly less likely to install a pop-up blocker, spam filter, or antispyware. My colleague Roxie Strohmenger has published other posts on how Latin American consumers feel about technology, and how Brazilian and Mexican consumers show different interests and behaviors. You can check them out here.

The Data Digest: Why Travelers Befriend A Brand

Social media has forever changed the way travelers interact with each other and companies — and its use is still growing. Forrester Technographics® data shows that 26 million more US online leisure travelers use social media in 2010 than in 2008. In fact, leisure travelers are really connected to travel companies beyond booking: A high 41% of US online leisure travelers have become travel social fans (TSFs) by friending, following, or becoming fans of a travel company or destination on a social networking site like Facebook, YouTube, Flickr, or Twitter. But why do they do this?

As the data shows, discounts are a powerful motivator. One in three friends, follows, or fans travel companies and destinations to learn about the seller's offers and discounts. As a result, smart travel organizations will start using social networking sites as extensions of their Web sites for travel deals. Travelocity, for example, has a 'roaming gnome' on its Facebook page that offers and promotes the company’s "Deals Toolkit." JetBlue Airways has a dedicated Twitter account, @JetBlueCheeps, to push special deals. Who will follow with the holiday season coming up?

Forecasting The Size Of The Pie – Considering Addressable Market

Recent data from the US Census Bureau indicates that the poverty level in the US has grown to 14%.  Just consider: Is a family of four, earning less than $22,000 per year, ever going to be an online household? Can they afford a computer and the cost of Internet access?

 In fact, a household with a very low income could obtain a computer, possibly helped by a subsidy or donor program, and they may start using the Internet to purchase goods or services that can save money. The chance may be low, but there’s something to be learned from considering this possibility while assessing your market opportunity, particularly if you sell goods online.

 Firms in various sectors have benefited from looking outside their traditional target group (as defined by income). Although not addressing low-income families, Tiffany & Co. is a good example of a business where it was valuable to consider a lower-income segment even when conventional wisdom suggested leaving that out of its addressable market definition.

 Another kind of definition to be careful about is technology ownership requirements. Mobile banking is commonly looked at as an enhancement to online banking. But, Forrester’s Technographics data indicates that people who have no online access can and do take advantage of mobile banking. In fact, this offline group is more likely to engage in mobile banking than their counterparts who do have online access but do not bank online. On the other hand, if you don’t have a mobile phone, you can’t be a mobile banker.

 Please share your experiences with us; you may even uncover a new business opportunity!

The Data Digest: Uptake Of Home Networks In Europe

With the adoption of more and more devices that can connect to Wi-Fi, it’s interesting to understand the uptake of home networks. Forrester's Technographics® data shows that 30% of online Europeans have already set up a wireless home network, and a further 11% are planning to get one in the next six months. The adoption of wireless home networks has grown in Europe since 2006, while the adoption of wired networks is declining (dropping from 12% in 2006 to 6% in 2009).

Three-quarters of online Europeans with a wireless home network share an Internet connection among multiple PCs, and 17% have already connected their PC to their TV set. Wireless networks are especially popular among families and multiple-PC households: 86% of wireless home network owners have more than one PC at home, and 40% have children living at home.

How Can Enterprise Feedback Management Help The Market Research Professional?

You might be wondering why this post has nothing to do with Latin American consumers. Well, in addition to my Latin American research, enterprise feedback management (EFM) is a new and exciting coverage area that I will be addressing to help market research (MR) professionals. My goal is to assist you in finding the right tools and processes that will aid you in making sense of all the copious amounts of information that is collected from all parts of your company regarding consumers and synthesize them into coherent, actionable solutions.

What is EFM? Right now it means several things. From the viewpoint of a customer experience (CXP) professional, it is a tool that can be used to assist in developing a systematic approach for incorporating the needs of one’s customers into the design of better customer experiences, or what we call at Forrester voice of the customer (VoC) programs. My colleague Andrew McInnes will be covering EFM, as well, but from the perspective of how CXP professionals can utilize these tools.

For a market research professional, it is also used as a tool, but is not specific to solely collecting customer experience feedback. I see it as an advantage in two main ways.

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The Data Digest: Interest In Connected TVs

The concept of traditional TV watching needs to be redefined. The TV has evolved from a passive device with a single content source to a simple, large-display screen on which numerous activities come together. In the past, consumers had a TV device (typically the set-top box), a movie device (typically the DVD player), and possibly a gaming device connected to the TV. But now, the game console streams movies, the set-top box records TV, and the PC does everything. The next step is connected TVs — HDTVs that incorporate a direct connection to the Internet, whether wired or wireless.

Connected TVs are a big deal to manufacturers, but Forrester Technographics® data found that consumers are struggling to understand the benefits. One of the challenges that manufacturers of these TVs face is that when viewers are in "TV mode," they seem unable to imagine doing anything with these TVs other than watching more TV. When questioned, people appear to want one thing: more video. The top responses focus on getting access to well-known sources of TV shows and movies like Netflix, Blockbuster, or regular broadcast and cable networks, both for men and women.

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