Can Your Product Walk And Talk?

Update From The New Brand Experience Lab

The inspiration for my first report, “Let Your Product Do The Talking,” was that marketers rely too much on communications to build their brand. Using consumer trends from Forrester’s Technographics Survey, I identified that while consumers are tuning out marketing messages, they are actually seeking out more product experiences.

In the future, I believe that companies will successfully build their brands by:

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Welcome To The “New Brand Experience Lab”

Once a consultant, always a consultant.

Having spent my entire 15-year career in the “advice giving” industry, between management consulting and advertising, I have found that the best advice is pragmatic, forward-thinking, grounded in research, and relevant to your needs. Relevance being the most important ingredient.

And the best way for me to provide relevant advice is to listen to your needs. 

So the purpose of my blog will be as much about understanding the issues and concerns of CMOs and Marketing Leaders as it will be about providing advice.

Coverage areas and topics I’m interested in.

Speaking of relevance, here are the topics that are relevant to me:

  • I’ll be primarily focused on helping CMOs and Marketing Leadership Professionals create the new brand experience. In order to create the new brand experience, I will be challenging the standard assumptions about brand strategy, positioning, and integrated marketing strategy. That means I will be taking a broad look across the entire marketing mix to create new synergies between the Product, Price, Place, and Promotion. In particular, I will focus on helping marketers leverage emerging digital trends, capabilities, and technologies to enable the new brand experience.
  • Secondarily, I will be focusing on helping marketers optimize their agency relationships to create the new brand experience – whether through brainstorming, benchmarking, digital thought leadership, consumer insights, digital strategies, or even agency selection.
  • Finally, I will be focusing on helping marketers adapt their organization so they can deliver the new brand experience.

What you can expect from my blog.

It’s a place where we will:

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How Can Marketers Overcome Social Clutter?

As more marketers take to Facebook and Twitter -- and as users' friend lists on these networks continues to grow -- it strikes me that it may be getting ever harder for marketers to actually get a message through to their target customers. After all, if the average Twitter user follows several hundred people, and all those people post on average a few tweets per day, and then the average Twitter user checks in only a couple times per day and reads maybe 40 or 50 tweets per check-in . . . they're missing a lot of messages, right? If you assume that logic is right (though obviously the data points are all just ballpark guesses right now), it got me wondering: If a marketer has 100,000 followers on Twitter, or 100,000 fans on Facebook, and they post something, what percentage of those followers or fans ever actually see that marketing message?

 

I've collected the data around this and am in the process of building a model to find the answer to my question -- and I'll be writing a report about that topic this month. In the meantime, though, I'd love to get your thoughts on the topic.

- Do you feel as if it's getting harder or easier for marketers to get a message to users through social media?

- Which social networks do you feel are the most cluttered, and which are the least cluttered?

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Google Opens Up Branded Keyword Bidding In Europe

On the heels of some positive court decisions earlier this year, Google today announced that they're changing their keyword bidding policies in Europe to match those already in place in the US, the UK, and elsewhere. Most notably, this means European marketers will now be able to display paid listings to users searching for other companies' trademarks. There's lots of coverage around, including:

Obviously, this isn't great news for brands. That's why Louis Vuitton and others were fighting against these policies in court; they've worked hard to build brand recognition and credibility and to drive the consumer desire that leads to a Web search -- and they feel as if Google is making money by selling those consumers to other marketers at the last moment.

But brands don't always lose. Sometimes those other marketers will be competitors, of course -- but sometimes they'll be the channel partners of the brands being searched for. Sony, for instance, shouldn't have any problem with Amazon.com and other retailers advertising Sony's digital cameras when consumers search for those cameras by name. For the retailers, then, this decision is a win: They have more freedom than before to target in-market buyers, no matter the brand for which they're searching.

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