Agile PMs need more than recycled process notes

Agile adoption requires a change in values, not just a change in process. That's the message of the Agile Manifesto, and everything we've learned in the year since the Manifesto's publication has only expanded and emphasized it. We might not have all the specifics on how that relationship works (for example, does an "Agile culture" automatically dictate Agile practices?), but the correlation is definitely there.

In technology companies, these values are critically important, since technology does not just improve the business, it is the business. Agile changes how teams develop and deliver technology. In a technology company, delivery includes practically everyone outside the development team—marketing, sales, support, consulting, partners, you name it. Beyond the janitorial staff, it's hard to think of someone who won't be effected when a tech company goes Agile.

Consequently, product managers and product marketers, sitting on the border between the development team and everyone else, are simultaneously the agents and targets of Agile transformation. For example, when monolithic releases crumble into many smaller iterations, people throughout the rest of the company have obvious questions, such as,  When can I tell a customer to expect the enhancement they've wanted for the last two years? When is the next time we're going to have to do sales training? When will we have delivered enough new value to merit a product launch? PMs facing this situation will have to make adjustments to their own work, such as building and communicating the product roadmap.

Read more

It’s Demolition Time: Say Bye-Bye To Massive, Text-Heavy Requirements Documentation

A couple of days ago, Texas Stadium was reduced to a pile of rubble. Wow. The former home of my Dallas Cowboys, the site of victories and record-setting performances — gone in a matter of minutes. Was I sad? Yeah. But also a bit relieved. The Cowboys have moved to their new, super-duper (and quite ostentatious) stadium, Texas Stadium memorabilia has been auctioned off, and the poor, neglected building had become quite an eyesore.

Sometimes destroying something unusable is the best way to move forward.

Run that statement past your approach to documenting software requirements. When was the last time you took a step back to evaluate how your organization represents requirements? If it’s been awhile and your business analysts are still delivering massive, text-heavy, all-encompassing business requirements documents (BRDs), it’s time for some demolition of your own.

Why? Compelling forces have converged, drastically changing the way application development teams author software requirements. Organizations are recognizing the connection between software failure and poor requirements, and authoring better requirements has become a major initiative in many firms. At the same time, Lean and Agile are front and center, so right-sizing requirements documentation is on everyone’s radar. Bottom line, you need to do more with less: author stronger requirements while minimizing waste and being as lean as possible.

Read more