Sneak preview for P-Camp Austin 2010

I'm still finishing up the actual presentations that I've proposed for the Product Camp in Austin this Saturday. You can go to the official site for more details about the presentations, but in the meantime, here's a sneak preview of all three. Topics include:

  • From Product Management To Social Product Management. Or, how I learned to stop worrying and love social media as a way to make smarter product decisions.
  • The Strategic Role of PM. Yes, really, PMs are increasingly playing a strategic role in tech companies. Why is this change happening, and what does it mean for you?
  • The Old Launch Codes Won't Work. A tell-all expose about why tech companies are generally unsatisfied with the results of launches, and how some major trends in the industry are providing ways to fix that problem. 

Since this is your conference, if you like these topics, please vote for them.

Don't outsmart yourself

In product marketing, you always want to sound like the smartest person in the room. However, you shouldn't prove it with marketing messages that only you fully understand.

At last, someone who can understand my brilliance
Colleague Mary Gerush and I are working on a market segmentation for requirements tools. It's a great excuse to get into a lot of very interesting conversations about some very deep topics. The requirements market is in transition, from an era of heavy-weight tools designed to address information management challenges, to something very different. (You'll have to stay tuned to find out what the new market looks like.) We're starting from scratch, with no particular attachment to the traditional terms and concepts for describing what these tools are supposed to do.

That's the entree into the very interesting conversations. Vendors in this space, whatever it is, are very smart people who think about the shape of the requirements market all day long. Not surprisingly, their opinions about the market, which are reflected in their marketing messages, are very smart, too. In fact, in a couple of occasions, I wonder if they were being a little too smart.

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