Case Study #8: How to Use Twitter for Customer Service: Carphone WareHouse

Many of my clients have asked, "How should I use Twitter for customer service?" There are many applications that are adding Twitter as part of the contact center apps. But today I'd like to talk about the basics of using Twitter. I spoke with Anne Wood, the Head of Knowledge Management at Carphone Warehouse to learn about how they entered into Twitterland.

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Case Study #7: NetApp Marketing Takes Ownership Of Its Community Initiative To Ensure Success

NetApp is an industry-leading provider of storage and data management solutions. It has a presence in more than 100 countries-- thousands of customers and a network of more than 2,200 partners-- and a culture of innovation, technology leadership, and customer success. The company was seeking to build higher brand awareness and deeper engagement with employees, customers, and partners and decided to deploy both customer and employee communities.

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Case Study #4: Can You Get a Little Satisfaction? You Don't Have to Be Mick Jagger - Yola.com Did! Customer Service Social Media

If you have been following this blog, you might remember that I posted this a while back. But with the new year here, I thought it might be good to repeat some of the case studies while adding new ones... just incase you missed them or incase you wanted a refresher as you start down the path of providing a solution to your company social media needs!

Remember that great song... "Can't get no... Satisfaction..." Some how I think that is the national anthem of most customers. Why is it so freaking hard to get satisfaction?

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Case Study #6: Cisco Consumer Business Group (Formerly Linksys) Builds the Business Case for Social Media

Consumer Business Group (CBG) — formerly Linksys — is a division of Cisco that offers a wide variety of consumer and small office voice over IP (VoIP) and networking solutions such as routers, switches, and storage systems under the Linksys by Cisco brand. CBG has long held a reputation for excellent technical support and has developed a number of innovative approaches to contain support costs while still offering responsive service. One key initiative was the introduction of an online customer support community.

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Case Study #3: InfusionSoft Uses Social Media to Reduce Customer Service Costs

If you have been following this blog, you might remember that I posted this a while back. But with the new year here, I thought it might be good to repeat some of the case studies while adding new ones... just incase you missed them or incase you wanted a refresher as you start down the path of providing a solution to your company social media needs!

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Next Best Models: The Process Agility Equation

You never know what’s coming at you next, which is why process agility is so important. Your organization must have a ready response for anything. And you must make sure that every process participant can identify, at their level, what that response might be, so they can take appropriate action.

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Case Study #2: How Lenovo Implemented Customer Service Social Media Best Practices

The Second Case Study on Customer Service Social Media: How To and The Results...

If you have been following this blog, you might remember that I posted this a while back. But with the new year here, I thought it might be good to repeat some of the case studies while adding new ones... just incase you missed them or incase you wanted a refresher as you start down the path of providing a solution to your company social media needs!

This is the second case studies in the series on Customer Service Social Media Best Practices! You might be wondering what I meant by "ownership." In organizational change management language... there are three stages of project success - awareness, buy-in and ownership. Here ownership doesn't me "owning" like it's mine - not yours. It means taking 100% responsibility for leading and faciliating solid, genuine, collaborative relationships with the whole company to further the whole company's succcess. Here's more details on how Lenovo accomplished their social media goals!

Why Did Lenovo Consider Social Media?

When Lenovo acquired the IBM PC computing division, they realized customers were talking about their products on 3rd party forums like notebookreview.com and thinkpads.com. They felt left out of these important customer conversations. To remedy that, they took ownership and lead the customer social media interactions.

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Case Study #1: How ACT! by Sage Software Transformed the Customer Experience By Social Media

The First Case Study in the Series About "How to Deploy Customer Service Social Media!"

If you have been following this blog, you might remember that I posted this a while back. But with the new year here, I thought it might be good to repeat some of the case studies while adding new ones... just in case you missed them or in case you wanted a refresher as you start down the path of providing a solution to your company social media needs!

When I published the ROI of customer service social media, everyone had asked me - who is doing social media and what are they doing. To help those who haven't started down the social media path, I put together the 5 Best Practices of customer service social media. That doc is chocked full of ideas you can use today. And to provide more details on how companies have accomplished their goals for social media, I also decided to publish a bunch of case studies! ACT! is the first of many! I hope it helps you to get a better idea of how valuable social media is and its bottom-line affects!

Who is Sage and What Did They Want to Accomplish With Social Media?

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Social Network Analysis: The Fuse Igniting Enterprise Data Warehouse Growth. It’s Planet Petabyte or Bust!

Social networks have always been with us, of course, but now they’ve gained concrete reality in the online fabric of modern life.

Social network analysis has, in a real sense, been with us almost as long as we’ve been doing predictive analytics. Customer churn analysis is the killer app for predictive analytics, and it is inherently social. It’s long been known that individual customers don’t always churn themselves—i.e., decide to renew and/or bolt to the competition—in isolation. As they run the continual calculus called loyalty in their heads and hearts, they’re receiving fresh feeds of opinion from their friends and families, following the leads of peers and influencers, and keeping their fingers to the cultural breeze. You could also make a strong case for social networking—i.e., individual behaviors spurred, shaped, and encouraged within communities—as a key independent variable driving cross-sell, up-sell, fraud, and other phenomena for which we’ve long built predictive models.

The other day, a Forrester client was asking me for educated guesses on how fast the average enterprise data warehouse (EDW) is likely to grow over the next several years, and as I was working through the analysis, I couldn’t avoid the conclusion that social network analysis—for predictive and other uses—will be an important growth driver (though not the entire story). I’d like to lay out my key points.

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Conversation as a Complex Event

Ah, memories. I remember the late, great Eighties, early in my analyst career, when I had my first brush with what was later known as “groupware.” It was a LAN-based package, “The Coordinator,” from Action Technologies. The architecture of the software wasn’t as important as the linguistic theory on which it was built: the notion that groups cultivate intelligence by structuring their internal conversations to achieve common goals.

Essentially, the package required people to tag every e-mail they sent based on whether it constituted a discussion of possibilities, a request for clarification, or a request for action—and it tracked these threads so that everybody knew the goal-oriented status of every conversation. As you can probably guess, this was a heavy-handed way of getting people to come to agreement. Software shouldn’t dictate how people choose to interact: real-world conversation’s far too complex and convoluted for that. Most people don’t like being forced to rephrase or reconceptualize how they communicate with others. In fact, most of us users simply defaulted to sending messages that discussed open-ended possibilities, rather than engage in a fussy protocol of formal requests and offers.

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