Apple iPad: The Best iPod Touch Available

I have a weakness. I like to think big. And when we heard so many juicy rumors about the Apple tablet device, now named the iPad, I knew that with Steve Jobs at the helm, I could afford to think big. So big did I think, that I suggested the iPad should take media consumption to the next level and create an entirely new category of device.

At first, Jobs appeared ready to confirm my suspicions. He said seductive things like, "Everybody uses a laptop and or a smartphone. The question has arisen lately. Is there room for a third category in the middle?" I was sitting on the edge of my seat, ready to hear Jobs demonstrate that new category of device. But he didn't.

Instead, what Apple debuted today was a very nice upgrade to the iPod Touch.

Don't get me wrong. I love the iPod Touch and I was this close to getting one for myself. Now that the iPad has arrived, I can finally get one, the new, big one. But it's not a new category of device. It doesn't really revolutionize the 5-6 hours of media we consume the way it could have. It doesn't even send Amazon's Kindle running to the hills for cover. In fact, the competitor likely to take the biggest hit from the arrival of the iPad is Apple, in the form of fewer iPod Touches sold and fewer MacBook Airs sold.

Read more

My view of 2010: beyond the predictions

Late last night, as Aussies nationwide enjoyed Australia Day fireworks or a post-barbecue slumber, Forrester published my "Australian Marketing Predictions For 2010".

Read more

Leno, O'Brien, and the Future of Media Measurement

With all of the news about Leno and O'Brien fighting for time slots on NBC's nightly post-prime time schedule, their ratings have shot up. But the fight for those slots is tough for NBC to justify since two talk show host did not equal more audience, and left the NBC affiliates and Fallon in the dust. While the ratings have risen temporarily, the overall trends has been a downward spiral.

Read more

Help Shape Our Media Research!

The Marketing Leadership team at Forrester has just launched our most recent global executive panel survey on Media Strategy. The goal of the survey is to understand how Marketing Leaders like you:

Read more

Nytimes.com: How to survive charging your readers

A storm has been brewing at The New York Times for a while now. Ever since TimesSelect -- the paid digital version of the Times -- was cancelled back in 2007, the "content wants to be free" crowd has danced around its proverbial grave, singing the equivalent of "ding, dong, paid media is dead." 

It's hard to argue against that viewpoint given the reality we're seeing: long-time newspapers closing their print editions entirely (see Seattle Post-Intelligencer), august magazines such as Gourmet shutting their doors, newspaper subscriptions at unprecedented lows, not to mention the power that Google has over the traffic that newspapers and magazines generate. Worse, our consumer surveys show us that 80% of US adults will choose not to pay for online newspaper or magazine content if they can't get it for free (see my colleague Sarah Rotman Epps' post on this for more).

It is amidst this maelstrom that nytimes.com is reportedly considering erecting a new pay wall -- one presumes a shiner, prettier one than the last wall, but a pay wall nonetheless. Read New York mag's take on the situation here. Not to put too fine a point on it, but this is a bad idea whose time has unfortunately come.

Read more

3DTV at CES: Poking Holes in the Hype

It's high time somebody said it. Sit through one too many CES keynotes, press conferences, or pitches, and you just might leave Las Vegas with the mistaken idea that 3DTV is going to be in all of our living rooms next year. ESPN and Discovery are committing to 3D cable and satellite channels, Sony is upgrading its PS3s to do 3D, and Taylor Swift's live performance opening night at CES was shown live in 3D (Right behind her, mind you. You had to put the glasses on in order to see Taylor Swift in 3D when she was, actually, in 3D already, right in front of the audience.)

Read more

CMOs: Its time to mandate the customer experience

The role of the CMO is changing from "head of marketing" to "corporate executive," but only when stars align in two ways. The first is when the CMO is a general manager with marketing expertise.  The second is when the CEO declares marketing and the brand experience to be corporate objectives rather than execution against. In either case, the CMO recruited to this task must drive change across the organization, connecting the dots to achieve a coherent brand experience regardless of the point at which the customer interacts with the company.

Read more