Security Predictions For 2010

 

Trying to avoid the obvious and the already underway, here are my predictions for 2010.

1. Cloud security standards emerge. By the end of 2010, we’ll see a framework emerge for establishing a well defined set of technology, practices, and processes, organized into different levels of trust. Ultimately, adherence to these specifications will need be certified by third parties. The effort won’t be complete, but it will be underway. Look to the government as key industry (other than the vendors) driving this effort.

COROLLARY: The use of cloud will take off as adopting organizations by and large overcome their security concerns – or at least, understand them at a specific enough level to seek out providers that satisfy these concerns.

2. Federation will start to take off by the end of 2010. Use of federation will be fueled by SaaS and cloud computing and the need for single sign-on to bridge identity from the enterprise to those external environments. Where standards reign over kludges, SAML will be the leading mechanism. OpenID will continue to be just a lab toy for the "Identerati".

3. Managed Security Services expands far beyond “Managed”. Organizations are not only turning to managed security services, they are seeking more from their providers than merely assuming operational functions. Increasingly, they seek partners to help them with security strategy, benchmarking, making the business case, and integration. MSSPs that are in fact multifaceted solution providers will start to establish market dominance. Big winners will be IBM, VZB, Wipro, among others.

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Facebook's new privacy settings

Last week, Facebook upgraded its privacy settings. I am sure by now many of you have gone through the new privacy setting wizard. But do you know all the ins and outs of the new settings and how to navigate them?

In general, the new Facebook privacy setting menu is easy to use and straightforward. Some of the new options Facebook provides are positive changes. For instance, you can now hide a wall post to specific individuals (or make them visible to specific individuals). This level of fine-grained control was not available before, which is a welcome change.

However, in the course of migrating to the new privacy settings, Facebook has made several categories of information visible by default to “Everyone.” If you didn’t actively manage your privacy settings through this new migration, some of your information, such as Family and Relationship, Education and Work, and your posts will be left visible to everyone, regardless of what your previous privacy settings were.

Another puzzling thing is that Facebook apparently does not think the ability to control who can see your “Friends list” belongs in privacy settings. Moreover, they’ve made everybody’s Friends list visible to the world by default. To turn that off, you have to go to your profile page and click the little crayon icon next to your friends list to unselect the “Show Friend List to everyone” option. If you have previously hidden your Friend list from public view, they are now free for all to see unless you did the little trick with the crayon icon! Even worse, your Friend list will now show up in search engine results.

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One of the Heartland lawsuits dismissed

See the news article here

This was the shareholder lawsuit, not the consumer/victim lawsuit, so different issues apply. But it's still interesting. Somewhere down the road, such a case will win…likely because of a smoking gun email by IT security staff. That calls for greater communication and accountability around security, which smells like GRC to me.

DataLossDB.org maps stock price showing when the data breach occurred. Here's the chart for Heartland. Stock price isn't always affected, even in big breaches. DSW stock kept rising after its breach of 1.4 million records. TJX stock didn't seem affected either, after its big breach.

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