Can Social Media Penetrate The Exec Suite?

Almost every day I hear people suggest that social media is at best only valuable as a marketing tool. There are people who believe that social media has no reach beyond a few "geeks" sitting at their computers all day. What these naysayers focus on is the technology and not the people connections. I believe it is the people connections that drive social media and it is the value of these connections that will continue to change the way we work and communicate.

With your help, I'm looking to measure the potential social media to connect people worldwide, even those senior executives and naysayers who are not already using social media. Here's how:

Three Simple Steps

We've built a very short survey on social media's value in business – nothing new here – but here's the twist: We're using social media as the vehicle, and social media evangelists (you) as the fuel, to get the survey into the hands of as many people as possible who are not yet using social media.

Here are three easy and quick steps to becoming a social media evangelist for this research:

  1. Go to http://forrester.com/2010socialsurvey and fill out the survey (all responses welcome) – it takes approximately 5 minutes;
  2. Refer two friends to the survey:
    1. Email a link to the survey
    2. OR tweet about it
    3. OR blog about it
    4. OR post a link in your online community

(if you really want to evangelize you can of course do more than one of these things).

 

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Crafting your technology strategy for business impact

That your technology strategy should be driven by business is a truism. We all know this -  architecture, strategy and IT overall should be driven by business needs, strategies and outcomes.

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IBM's CIO study reveals where you should focus your IT leadership efforts

In September this year (2009) I was invited to New York City by IBM to preview their soon to be released CIO study. Very soon after my return home I wrote up an insightful, relevant, and actionable blog post on what I learned at the event. Of course you are going to have to take my word on this, as for some reason I can't find it... It has disappeared into the ether (perhaps I didn't hit the "Save" button at the bottom of the page?). So, despite that fact that the study was released three months ago, I am going to redo my analysis of the study - although now that some local (Australian & Indian - sorry rest of Asia Pacific!) results have been released there is some more relevant information available.

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The Story of the Risk Manager’s Increasing Value Continues...

A few months ago I wrote about the rising visibility and responsibility of risk management professionals, linking to articles about the growing demand for risk training and talent. Along that train of thought, I was just able to get to this month’s edition of Risk Management, which along with a great photographic review of the last year in risk management, has an article outlining the progress the profession has made over the last decade. It’s interesting to think that 10 years ago risk management was a much smaller discipline focused on relatively narrow problems like the Y2K software flaw. Things have changed a lot.

Case in point, the SEC announced this week the approval of new rules that will, among other things, require companies to disclose the relationship between their compensation policies and risk management, as well as describe the board of directors’ role in risk oversight.

Understanding what compensation policies have a material impact on an organization’s risk and developing policies for board-level oversight of risk will require guidance from internal and/or external risk experts... good news for any risk experts who appreciate gainful employment. And of course, many additional regulations and SEC rules expected to come together early next year are also likely to continue this trend.

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Innovation Matters More Than EU's Acceptance Of Microsoft Browser Menu

The EU’s decision this week to accept Microsoft’s proposed browser menu means in March European consumers purchasing or upgrading their operating system will be presented a choice of browser. Beyond that, the acceptance means little for enterprises.

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Hacking the In-Human Drone

A while back, I blogged on how researchers have developed tools to intercept streaming video from video conferencing systems and IP surveillance cameras. Today I feel so prescient with the Wall Street Journal's article on how Iraqi insurgents are using similar software to intercept the video feed of Predator Drones.

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The article has the catchy subtitle "$26 Software Is Used to Breach Key Weapons in Iraq; Iranian Backing Suspected." It discusses how the insurgents are using the software to intercept the Drone's unencrypted video stream, "potentially providing them with information they need to evade or monitor U.S. military operations."

According to the article, the military has been aware that this type of attack was posssible for some time: "The potential drone vulnerability lies in an unencrypted downlink between the unmanned craft and ground control. The U.S. government has known about the flaw since the U.S. campaign in Bosnia in the 1990s, current and former officials said. But the Pentagon assumed local adversaries wouldn't know how to exploit it, the officials said."

Let's hope that the Pentagon has learned what happens when you ass-u-me things...

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Did IBM Buy Lombardi To Raise Their Profile With The Business?

 

New_photo by Clay Richardson

For many, IBM's announcement to acquire Lombardi came as a little pre-Christmas surprise. Over the past 24 hours, I've heard several arguments for and against this deal being a game changer.  Ultimately, if you look at this deal strictly as a software acquisition, then it presents many potential problems and hurdles for both IBM and Lombardi:

  • IBM's BPM portfolio is already confusing to customers, with customers and prospects struggling to reconcile whether they should buy Websphere Process Server or FileNet P8 (not to mention the peripheral workflow capabilities provided by Lotus).  From a software perspective, this acquisition makes IBM's BPM maze even more intimidating to navigate.

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Facebook's new privacy settings

Last week, Facebook upgraded its privacy settings. I am sure by now many of you have gone through the new privacy setting wizard. But do you know all the ins and outs of the new settings and how to navigate them?

In general, the new Facebook privacy setting menu is easy to use and straightforward. Some of the new options Facebook provides are positive changes. For instance, you can now hide a wall post to specific individuals (or make them visible to specific individuals). This level of fine-grained control was not available before, which is a welcome change.

However, in the course of migrating to the new privacy settings, Facebook has made several categories of information visible by default to “Everyone.” If you didn’t actively manage your privacy settings through this new migration, some of your information, such as Family and Relationship, Education and Work, and your posts will be left visible to everyone, regardless of what your previous privacy settings were.

Another puzzling thing is that Facebook apparently does not think the ability to control who can see your “Friends list” belongs in privacy settings. Moreover, they’ve made everybody’s Friends list visible to the world by default. To turn that off, you have to go to your profile page and click the little crayon icon next to your friends list to unselect the “Show Friend List to everyone” option. If you have previously hidden your Friend list from public view, they are now free for all to see unless you did the little trick with the crayon icon! Even worse, your Friend list will now show up in search engine results.

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Is IT Sourcing Getting Less Strategic?

Recent findings from McKinsey’s annual global survey into IT strategy and spending, conducted in October this year, made me stop and think. These concerned IT executives’ own view of the strategic sourcing effectiveness of their IT organizations. Most respondents — two thirds of the sample — rated their strategic sourcing approach as effective. But this endorsement looks less impressive next to the 2008 findings.

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When is enterprise mobility not really ENTERPRISE mobility? (hint - most of the time!)

We often hear about how important enterprise mobility is to businesses. For years ICT events companies have been holding events about "enterprise mobility" and "the future of wireless" etc - and they have filled halls with attendees and sponsors/exhibitors.
 

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