Another acquisition in the Web security service space — Cisco Systems acquires ScanSafe

Chenxi Wang Cloud security service is hot, hot, hot. My last blog post highlighted the acquisition of Purewire by Barracuda earlier this month. Today, Cisco Systems announced the intention to acquire ScanSafe, another Web security services company. Cisco’s entering this space shows that Web security services are now on the radar screen of enterprises.

At Forrester we are seeing a definite rise in interest in Web security services, partially fueled by the general interest level in cloud services. Many IT managers told me that they are being asked by their management, “Why not consider cloud services (to fulfill this IT function)?”

Is cloud Web security service for you? A good answer to the “Why not consider cloud services?” question requires examining the pros and cons of outsourcing to the cloud, which should cover, at a minimum, the following decision points:

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IBM Gets Smart With Its Archiving Strategy

Brian-Hill  by Brian W. Hill

IBM’s announcement this week outlining the vendor’s archiving vision and strategy is ambitious and far reaching in scope. It’s encouraging to see IBM working across its different internal divisions to deliver solutions that address specific enterprise needs (e.g., message archiving, file system archiving, and SharePoint archiving) while providing a framework and a set of capabilities for broader enterprise archiving.

My initial feedback on IBM’s strategic announcements is positive. Here’s why:

 

  • Information and technology chaos reign today. Enterprises struggle with IT environments comprised of multiple, fragmented archiving, records management, and eDiscovery applications. Historically, organizations have deployed these applications to address specific needs such as message archiving to improve operational performance or records management to meet regulatory requirements for physical records. But because these deployments have typically evolved organically and in isolation from one another, enterprises grapple with fragmentation, with disparate systems that lack consistent policies and entail significant ongoing TCO and legal risk. In our Q3 2009 survey, 60 percent of records management stakeholders rated synchronizing eDiscovery, records management, and archiving during the eDiscovery process as “challenging” or “very challenging.” IBM clearly understands this scenario and is aligning its offerings and messaging to meet these enterprise needs.
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Boomer Retirement And IT - Are You An Ostrich, Chicken-little, Or an Owl?

The rock-band R.E.M. sang a song about the "end of the world as we know it" and to hear some people talk - the end is near! 

The Chicken-littles of the world would have us believe that retiring Baby Boomers will wreak untold havoc. Half the world's population will suddenly disappear from the workforce - collapsing world markets, straining national pension systems to the breaking point, and burdening younger generations with unmanageable national debt.

Other folks are at the opposite end of the spectrum - they're in denial, like ostriches with their heads deep in the sand - if they don't look at how bad the problem is, it can't hurt them, right? No staffing problems here - look we can still hire people, let's deal with today's problems and not go looking for tomorrow's troubles!

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Why Mobility Will — And Does NOW — Matter To EAs And IT

Chris Silva

Here at Forrester, we spend a good deal of time talking about the future of the mobile enterprise. Whether that's an emerging standard for a faster, more capable mobile network or a future of all-out mobile connectivity with applications and devices ready to tap into it.

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Telepresence Jumpstarts Video Collaboration

Claire-Schooley By Claire Schooley

Telepresence is the life-size, true color, no latency video meeting technology that creates a “wow” reaction from participants, especially those who have experienced some traditional videoconferencing that gave poor picture quality, out-of synch audio/video, and added no sense of presence to a meeting.  Here are some factors that make telepresence different:

  • Video provides high quality 1080p pictures with hidden cameras placed to achieve eye contact no matter where people are seated around the conference table.
  • Audio is full duplex with microphones and speakers that allow sound to come from the direction of the speaker.
  • The environment is purpose-built with lighting arrays, speakers, and cameras all configured for the optimum experience.  Conference tables, chairs, and even the wall paint are the same at all sites to convey a uniform sense of presence.
  • Managed service and support assure that this expensive system is going to work. Many organizations buy a concierge-type service model so participants just need to push a button to start the videoconference.
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Process-centric DQ Services and MDM among top technology trends to watch

Rob Karel By Rob Karel

For the past few years, master data management (MDM) has been a hot topic among enterprise architects and data management professionals.

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Telepresence Jumpstarts Video Collaboration

Claire-SchooleyBy Claire Schooley

Telepresence is the life-size, true color, no latency video meeting technology that creates a “wow” reaction from participants, especially those who have experienced some traditional videoconferencing that gave poor picture quality, out-of synch audio/video, and added no sense of presence to a meeting.  Here are some factors that make telepresence different:

• Video provides high quality 1080p pictures with hidden cameras placed to achieve eye contact no matter where people are seated around the conference table.
• Audio is full duplex with microphones and speakers that allow sound to come from the direction of the speaker.
• The environment is purpose-built with lighting arrays, speakers, and cameras all configured for the optimum experience.  Conference tables, chairs, and even the wall paint are the same at all sites to convey a uniform sense of presence. Managed service and support assure that this expensive system is going to work. Many organizations buy a concierge-type service model so participants just need to push a button to start the videoconference.

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Why You Should Care About Having A Diverse IT Ops Department

Rachel-Dines Diversity (or lack thereof) in IT has been a hot topic in the news and among our clients in recent months. And it's true, IT departments are notorious for their lack of diversity, and the problem is only getting worse. Over the past few years, the number of women and underrepresented minorities (URMs) in IT has been dropping steadily. In IT Infrastructure and Operations, the picture is even grimmer — data from the US Bureau of Labor Statistics shows that IT job titles such as computer hardware engineer and network and computer system administrator have some of the lowest participation rates of women and minorities (see figure). Although some IT careers are more diverse than others — computer operators, for example, show evenly represented women and minorities by participation in the workforce — very few women and minorities can be counted in the ranks of management.

 

Women And Minorities' Representation In Different IT Roles


"Why should I care?" many firms ask. Besides issues of equality and social responsibility, there are several major advantages to taking steps to improve diversity in your workplace:

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A Forrester Interview With Steve Ballmer About The SharePoint Business

Matt-Brown  By Matthew Brown

I had the pleasure to sit down with Steve Ballmer for an interview at the Microsoft SharePoint conference in Las Vegas this week. My research team at Forrester spends a lot of time thinking, researching, and writing about the future of information work. So getting Steve’s view on SharePoint’s decade-long evolution from a basic document sharing application to a broad platform for rapid application development, intranet and internet sites, content management, search, social computing, and composite applications, was something I couldn’t pass up.

Unfortunately, pre-taped interviews are like a ball of pizza dough. They start life with different ingredients, get molded into interesting shapes through the discussion, until they’re eventually pounded and rolled out by communications professionals into something utterly flat and lifeless. This is not a ding on Microsoft, Forrester has its share of communications pros with flour on their hands too. For the video version, click here. But let’s consider several highlights that did and didn’t make the video. Consider that Steve:

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Is application consolidation keeping you up at night?

Murphy_p_small I've written a lot of research around the topic of application portfolio management (APM), and how the tools are slowly maturing from their application mining roots. Although the process of APM applies equally across packaged and custom-appls, the mining tools, until recently anyway, have excluded packaged applications.

Our application development team recently expanded with some new colleagues, and one of the topics a new colleague - George Lawrie - and I intend to take on as a joint effort is application consolidation across custom and packaged applications.

We'd like to know - how important is this topic to you - what are the nuances of it that keep you awake at night, or is it a non-issue? If it is a non-issue, why? Have you done such a good job of staving off redundant and obsolete technology, or is it someone else's responsibility? Please chime in, we'd love to hear about your application environments.