Podcast: The Millennials, The Next Power Generation In The Workforce

Our latest featured podcast is Claire Schooley's "The Millennials, The Next Power Generation In The Workforce".

 

In this podcast, BP&A Senior Analyst Claire Schooley discusses the rise of the millenial in the workforce — and strategies for most effectively using their skills.

 

 

We look forward to your questions and comments.

 

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The Generations React During Our Teleconference on “Gen Y and the Future of the Workplace”

Claire-Schooley By Claire Schooley


TJ Keitt
, Heidi Lo and I presented a Forrester Teleconference about the Millennial or GenY on September 2, 2009. The multi-generational chat was by far the most active I’ve seen during a Teleconference with over 100 entries in an hour. TJ and I presented for a half hour and then opened the phone lines for voice questions. Heidi handled the tweets. Having two co-presenters helped us to participate in the chat. Because the pace of chat was so fast with so many conversations, participants were reacting to comments of others rather than just responding to a presenter comment or question. It was dynamic and truly community generated.

The premise of the teleconference was that the youngest generation in the workforce (Gen Y or Millennials) is neither revolutionizing the workforce (yet) nor acting as entitled employees. Some of the highlights of the participant interaction follow:

  • “It’s hard to get a job because as a new grad we can’t meet the ‘years of experience’ requirement.” Recommendation: Apply anyway. Be tenacious and prove that you can do the job. One Baby Boomer participant is about to start a company that mentors new employees at corporate customers to address this “experience” requirement. Another GenYer suggested using your social network to reach the hiring manager. Another said that that GenXers in an organization can be excellent mentors for the GenYers.
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The Generations React During Our Teleconference On “Gen Y And The Future Of The Workplace”

Claire-Schooley by Claire Schooley

TJ Keitt, Heidi Lo and I presented a Forrester Teleconference about the Millennial or GenY on September 2, 2009. The multi-generational chat was by far the most active I’ve seen during a Teleconference with over 100 entries in an hour. TJ and I presented for a half hour and then opened the phone lines for voice questions. Heidi handled the tweets. Having two co-presenters helped us to participate in the chat. Because the pace of chat was so fast with so many conversations, participants were reacting to comments of others rather than just responding to a presenter comment or question. It was dynamic and truly community generated.

The premise of the teleconference was that the youngest generation in the workforce (Gen Y or Millennials) is neither revolutionizing the workforce (yet) nor acting as entitled employees. Some of the highlights of the participant interaction follow:

  • “It’s hard to get a job because as a new grad we can’t meet the ‘years of experience’ requirement.” Recommendation: Apply anyway. Be tenacious and prove that you can do the job.  One Baby Boomer participant is about to start a company that mentors new employees at corporate customers to address this “experience” requirement. Another GenYer suggested using your social network to reach the hiring manager. Another said that that GenXers in an organization can be excellent mentors for the GenYers.
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Application Development Professionals Must Take The User Experience Bull By The Horns

Developers can write efficient and elegant code.

  • Architects can choose cost effective and flexible platforms.
  • Quality assurance and testing pros can make sure it works bug free.
  • Business analysts can uncover and document key requirements.
  • Project managers can craft a plan to get the app written on-time.
  • Managers can make sure that it is all done within the budget.
  • CIO's can find talent and put together teams.

This Prowess Is All For Naught If You Don't Get The User Experience Right!

But, this technical, process, and management prowess is all for naught if you cannot design a compelling user experience (UX) that is useful, usable, and desirable.

Ux_definition

Application Development Pros Are No Less Capable Of Learning UX Design Than Anyone Else.

Unfortunately, many application development professionals are unlearned when it comes to knowing how to design user experiences that makes users say "Wow!". It is not that they don't want to design great user experiences. They do. It is just that no one ever taught them how.

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When To Use A BPM Suite?

Connie Moore By Connie Moore

I was going through a bunch of old slide decks last week and came across this one particular slide that struck me.  I think it gave me pause because I don't normally use the slide, and I hadn't seen it in a long time.  I think the material is workwhile for anyone thinking about using a business process management (BPM) suite, so here goes.

Consider a BPM suite when you need to:

  • Change processes frequently. This is probably the most important reason to look at using a BPMS, but a few years ago you wouldn't have seen this on the list, much less anywhere near the top. Back then, everyone preached the mantra that you should find a repeatable process and use BPM to automate it.  Maybe this came from a Six Sigma view of the world in which practitioners were trying to drive out variation in order to reduce defects and increase quality.  Anyway, the old thinking has been turned on its head now: use BPM for processes that constantly change (in addition to the highly repeatable ones) because processes that constantly change are 1) hard to automate and 2) probably some of your highest value processes because they are usually people and knowledge intensive.  A BPMS coupled with a continous improvement mindset (this latter point is the really important part) can really make a difference when it comes to processes that change.  And let's admit it right now--business processes change a WHOLE lot more than we think they do.
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A Day In The Life Of An Information Worker

Ted-Schadler by Ted Schadler

How do information workers -- people that use computers or smartphones in their job -- spend their days?

We set out to answer that question using our new Workforce Technographics(R) data. In our launch survey to understand how regular people use computers, smartphones, and applications to get their work done, we surveyed 2,001 people in the US with jobs in which they use a computer. We asked about all kinds of things, including how much time they spend with their computers and phones, which applications they use daily or even hourly, what applications they find indispensable, whether they work mostly with other employees or with customers or partners, and much more.

Our first report is a quick snapshot of a day in the life of an information worker (iWorker). (We'll be sharing a lot more data at a Webinar on Thursday at 11 AM ET; register here.) For example, did you know that:

  • Gen X (not Gen Y) is the most likely to use Web 2.0 technology to get their job done?

  • Smartphones are available to only 11% of US information workers?

  • Email is still the only application used on an hourly basis by most iWorkers?

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Analysis from Microsoft TechEd 2009 - Take 1

Gen Y and the Future of the Workplace: Recapping Our Discussion With Forrester Clients

Followers of my posts on this blog have seen a consistent theme: what does the influx of young workers mean for the present and future business world? Yesterday afternoon my colleagues Clarie Schooley and Heidi Shey joined me in hosting 82 Forrester clients for an open and frank discussion on this topic. The conversation, which included participants across the age spectrum, was spirited and landed on a few broad concepts:

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2009 Forrester U.S. Benchmark Data Overview

After much hard toil in the form of data cutting, analysis, and head scratching, my colleague Jacqueline Rousseau-Anderson and I have finished the 2009 Forrester U.S. Benchmark Data Overview and the report is now live — if you’re a Forrester client you can access the document at http://www.forrester.com/go?docid=54959.

If you’re not familiar with our Benchmark report, you’ve been missing out. Forrester has the longest running survey of technology adoption in North America, more than a decade’s worth of data that tells a detailed, complete story of the technologies that consumers use, their online and offline behaviors, their demographics and attitudes. Our mail-based survey was completed by nearly fifty thousand respondents this year, and the data is representative of the US and Canadian populations at both a household and individual level. In past years we’ve reported on North America as a whole but this year opted to produce separate reports for the US and Canada — it’s the US data that we’ve just published (those of you anxious for an update on the Great White North will have to wait a bit as we put the finishing touches on the Canadian Benchmark).

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Consumer Market Research Techniques: A Primer For IT Professionals

Ted-Schadler by Ted Schadler

Employees are people, too.They just don't look like you. At least most of them don't. To understand what your workforce needs from technology and from you, you have to walk a mile in their shoes.

That's hard to do -- not to mention darn uncomfortable at times! But it is possible to get to know your workforce by grouping them by who they are and what they need from you. There are three techniques that consumer market researchers have developed over the last 40 years to do just that:

  1. Surveys to analyze and segment the workforce. This is step one and something that we'll drill into more detail on over the next few blog posts. Asking good questions, making sure everybody's represented, doing analysis that helps you answer your key questions, this is where the best analysis begins. You'll come up with segments like "technology enthusiasts" and "road warriors."

  2. Focus groups to bring the segments to life. Once the segments are identified, you can invite 5 or 6 people to come in and talk about what they do and what they need from technology. This gives you the "why" and the "how" to go along with the "what" that the survey and segmentation provide. With focus groups, a road warrior starts to look like a real person.

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