Glenn's Picks for the ITSM Fusion 09 Conference

Glenn O'DonnellI am off to the annual itSMF USA conference in Dallas TX, better known as Fusion 09. This is expected to be the biggest and best IT Servcie Management conference yet and the pinnacle of the itSMF USA organizations progress to date. I hope these predictions come true because I am an avid supporter of itSMF and its mission to promote service management excellence.

As one element of a new partnership between Forrester Research and itSMF USA, we will be holding one-on-one meetings between conference attendees and Forrester analysts. Both my delightful and brilliant colleague Evelyn Hubbert and I will be there and we look forward to one-on-one meetings with as many people we can fit in!

With all the wonderful sessions that will be happening at the conference, it is tough to pick favorites. Still, here are the sessions I hope to catch while I'm there.

Monday 21-Sep

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BI Saas Vendors Are Not Created Equal

Boris Evelson By Boris Evelson

As many of my readers know, for years I’ve been quite skeptical about non-mainstream BI solutions, such as BI SaaS. Security, control, operational risk, data, metadata and application integration are just some of the requirements for enterprise BI that are still on my watch list as potential reasons to be weary about BI SaaS. However, I am also a very pragmatic analyst and truly believe that nothing but supply and demand drive the markets.  And I am now, slowly but surely, beginning to believe there couldn’t be a better case for demand for BI SaaS especially after findings from one of the project that I am currently conducting.

I recently talked to a few dozen non-IT professionals (specifically in front office roles, such as sales and marketing) across multiple industries, regions and company sizes. Guess how many of them fully or partially relied on IT for their day to day operational and strategic information needs? BIG FAT ZERO!!! This finding was a huge surprise to me – yes, I did expect to find something like less then 50% reliance on IT, but I surely did not expect to find 0%.

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What are the Next Secret Weapons in the Test Manager’s Toolbox?

As teams become more agile, or, add more agile like practices to traditional
development practices, I’m seeing increasing frustration on the part of test
managers.  Rapid development cycles and scrutinized bottom lines are putting
more pressure on them to deliver comprehensive testing in tighter time
frames.  More and more testing is being taken on by development teams, and while
that is a positive trend to be sure.  More stringent testing performed by
development is a good thing, as a long time QA manager myself, I used to pray
for consistent unit and integration testing, but, ultimately, developers are not
trained to think in the same way that QA does.  Development testing is meant to
ensure that the code, service, or integration performs the way it was conceived;
it doesn’t always cover the assurance that the business process is being met
and it doesn’t replace the end to end perspective that an organization needs to
ensure that the highest quality software is being delivered. Development testing
is faster, to be sure.  End to end testing takes more time, but it’s necessary.
Test managers must do something to prevent testing being co-opted by development
at the expense of business value.

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Developing Your Lean Process Improvement Game Plan

Clay Richardson interviews Tom Higgins, CIO with Territory Insurance Office, a commercial insurance and financial services firm based in Darwin, Australia. The discussion covers how TIO was able to deliver value to the business by delivering business process management in a cost effective way — without the usual bloat and excessive overhead associated with enterprise BPM initiatives.

http://a964.g.akamaitech.net/f/964/714/1h/www.forrester.com/role_based/images/author/imported/forresterDotCom/Podcasts/BPA/Clay%20Richardson_Developing%20Lean%20Process%20Improvement%20Game%20Plan.mp3

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Thinking About Software Machines

During the past two weeks, I received two client Inquiries about specialized Java hardware and Larry Ellison announced v2 of Oracle's "database machine."

These two seemingly disconnected events made me ask: Is specialized hardware for software inevitable? Last year, we saw TIBCO announce a messaging appliance too. And IBM has a robust business in XML and security appliances. Will growing volumes of data, messages, and logical operations force us to adopt specialized hardware, abandoning the unbundled software model IBM introduced back when real Hippies roamed the Earth?

The client Inquiries were from firms having to invest heavily in infrastructure and still struggling to keep up with their Java processing loads. Both had seen Azul Systems, found its touted performance numbers compelling, but wondered: "Where are the other competitors?" Answer: I don't see any others doing what Azul does.

Why? My answer: Too few customers buy this way -- particularly from a startup with a proprietary software machine. IBM, HP, Intel, and the other big vendors don't see enough of a market yet to take the plunge.

With its database machine, Oracle claims impressive advances in I/O and query speeds, and disk compression. But the company says it has 20 customers for this product. For a new model and a new product, that's not bad. But I think it helps answer my question: Only the tippy top of the enterprise food chain really needs software machines for general purpose products like databases, Java application servers, and message processing. The majority of customers can use other software techniques to keep growing without being locked into proprietary software machines. Virtualization, distributed caching, in-memory databases, optimized garbage collection, and alternative database structures come to mind.

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Let’s Get To Work, Folks! Listen To iWorkers To Improve Productivity And Morale

Sheri-McLeish by Sheri McLeish

Now that summer is a distant memory, it’s time to get really busy. I know, I know, it didn’t feel like it slowed down. Financial stress, job uncertainty, and the general economic malaise seem to have made people work harder. Non-farm business sector labor productivity increased 6.6% during the second quarter of 2009, according to the latest U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics report. This was the largest productivity increase since the third quarter of 2003, and it came as the unemployment rate hit a 26-year high at 9.7%. But that doesn’t mean employees are happy about it.

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Podcast: Developing Process Skills For Your Business Analysts

Our latest featured podcast is Connie Moore's "Developing Process Skills For Your Business Analysts".



In this podcast, BP&A Research Director Connie Moore discusses best practices for developing process skills in Business Analysts.





We look forward to your questions and comments.



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Subscribe to Business Process & Applications podcasts through iTunes.

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Global versus local: how do you get the messages right?

Jennifer Bélissent [Posted by Jennifer Bélissent]

Global marketing also requires a degree of consistency. How do you strike that balance?  My new report — Get the B2B Messages Right: Balance Global Consistency And Local Relevancy — discusses the challenge of getting the global messages right for local audiences, and provides some recommendations for how to do it.

In my newest blog post, "Global versus Local" at B2B Beyond Borders, I surface some of the data behind the report and take you behind a personal example that didn't make the report.

Where are tech buyers getting their information?

Jennifer Bélissent [Posted by Jennifer Bélissent]

Just wanted to call attention to a couple of new Forrester reports. I’ve started drilling into the Four Ps — mostly on the promotion front.  Here are a few highlights:

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Which is it, shortage of mainframe skills ... or jobs?

Murphy_p_small   

There is a lot of noise lately from 2 camps - one swears that the availability of people with mainframe skills is drying up rapidly - they either forecast dire shortages, or note problems hiring for certain positions internally. Most of the trade press articles are firmly in this camp.

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