Come Next Election, More Than "Entirely Possible"

I rarely quote Frank Rich. But think about this for a few minutes:

    YouTube, the medium that has transformed our culture and politics, didn’t exist four years ago. Four years from now, it’s entirely possible that some, even many, of the newspapers and magazines covering this campaign won’t exist in their current form, if they exist at all. The Big Three network evening newscasts, and network news divisions as we now know them, may also be extinct by then.

Usage-based Broadband

As reported by Karl Bode, Comcast has come clean regarding its usage-based broadband caps for residential users. The company's actions follow its long history of having an undefined ceiling on "excessive use," and its more recent P2P throttling actions which had net neutrality advocates crying foul. To Comcast's credit, the newly-defined 250 GB monthly cap is clearly targeted at the heaviest users rather than the average person. (According to Comcast, the median monthly data usage for residential customers is 2-3 GB.)

Comparing Comcast's single 250 GB cap with more restrictive caps imposed by other carriers (Frontier's new 5 GB cap springs to mind) highlights the difference between using bandwidth caps to manage the network versus generating incremental revenue.

I've just finished up a report on usage-based broadband (now requiring a few minor edits!) that lays out who's doing what, and tackles the competitive and consumer impact of introducing caps. I'll post an update when the report hits the Jupiter website.

3g Mobile Phone Battery Life

This is a slide from a report I wrote over three and a half years ago on Mobile Music Phones.

In other words, the more successful a phone is with its design, the more people want to use their phones various features, and so the more strain is placed on the battery and a phone's daily life expectancy falls.

Related research reports:
Mobile Devices - Meeting the Service Needs of Upgraders
, published on August 16, 2008.
Mobile Music Phones
, published on January 12, 2005.

 

Mobile Social Networking

o2 & MySpace or Orange & Bebo were among the most striking deals between European mobile operators and online social networking sites in 2007. Many have followed since then and a bunch of mobile-only players are also claiming to have great audiences.

Handset manufacturers have also embraced the trend and the recent announcement that Nokia would made a Friendster widget available (via Widset) on the brand new N79 is a good example of that. Not to mention m.facebook.com or the iPhone facebook app and many many others.

My colleague Julie Ask just published a very interesting report on this precise topic: Mobile Social Networking: Assessing Social Strategies for Carriers and Handset Manufacturers. A must read.

Going Corporate

For the past two days, several Jupiter analysts attended a meeting of the minds at Forrester headquarters in Cambridge. We assembled for a few reasons. First, to get up to speed on Josh's book, Groundswell, and the surge of interest it has generated. Second, to have a visionary discussion on the future of everything social (no small task, of course.) Finally, we just wanted to gel as a team.

Read more

Going Corporate

For the past two days, several Jupiter analysts attended a meeting of the minds at Forrester headquarters in Cambridge. We assembled for a few reasons. First, to get up to speed on Josh's book, Groundswell, and the surge of interest it has generated. Second, to have a visionary discussion on the future of everything social (no small task, of course.) Finally, we just wanted to gel as a team.

Read more

Going Corporate

For the past two days, several Jupiter analysts attended a meeting of the minds at Forrester headquarters in Cambridge. We assembled for a few reasons. First, to get up to speed on Josh's book, Groundswell, and the surge of interest it has generated. Second, to have a visionary discussion on the future of everything social (no small task, of course.) Finally, we just wanted to gel as a team.

Read more

Using Location to Give Context to Content

I saw my first really good example today of using location to add context to content. It was simple, but good ... and to me I define good as useful/providing some utility.

I received an email from Orbitz alerting me to the fact that the Republican Nat'l Convention is in Minneapolis/St. Paul at the same time I will be there, and as a result, there could be a lot of traffic on specific highways.

There is a time component i.e., the dates I will be there. There is the location component. They know what highways are near the airport. They've predicted the impact of an event co-located in the city I'm visiting. It's well done.

This isn't mobile, but this is a great example of using context to deliver relevant content. I write a lot about location-based services and how to use an individual's current or future location to serve relevant content or ads. It's the kind of content I want on my cell phone.

Not sure who did this for Orbitz, but I'd be interested in hearing more about your technology.

Categories:

Going Green, Embracing the Groundswell, etc, First Take

Emily calls it going corporate. Jeremiah calls it a mash-up. Irregahdless, as I think they say in Southie, what it means is putting together the two best teams in social media-marketing-computing research. And you know, even to this old cynic, it's already feeling like a team. (That whole Cambridge-Manhattan thing is muted by California and Europe and all the leftover New Englanders at Jupiter....)

Some early observations:

Boy, do they have a lot of process. (Refreshingly, it's aligned with corporate and client objectives.)

They brainstorm just like we do: Way too many random whiteboard pattern-matching exercises!

Read more

Using Location to Give Context to Content

I saw my first really good example today of using location to add context to content. It was simple, but good ... and to me I define good as useful/providing some utility.

I received an email from Orbitz alerting me to the fact that the Republican Nat'l Convention is in Minneapolis/St. Paul at the same time I will be there, and as a result, there could be a lot of traffic on specific highways.

There is a time component i.e., the dates I will be there. There is the location component. They know what highways are near the airport. They've predicted the impact of an event co-located in the city I'm visiting. It's well done.

This isn't mobile, but this is a great example of using context to deliver relevant content.

I write a lot about location-based services and how to use an individual's current or future location to serve relevant content or ads. It's the kind of content I want on my cell phone.

Not sure who did this for Orbitz, but I'd be interested in hearing more about your technology.

Categories: