NY Times iPhone App cont'd

I still like it, but bunches of sections don't actually update. Including "Technology" it seems. How can that possibly be the case?

Enter At Your Own Risk? Some Thoughts On UGC Contests

[Posted by Tom Cummings]

It’s no secret that many marketers love User Generated Content (UGC) promotions.  And really, what’s not to love?  Toss up a website with a ‘submit here’ link, let your audience handle all of the creative, let the fans decide their favorites, then sit back and let the word-of-mouth go to work.   In exchange for a small prize and 15 minutes of fame, your community members will do all of your work!  At least, that’s the theory. 

Some promotions aim to just get fans involved.  CNN.com allows “iReporters” to submit pictures and videos that occasionally are featured on the frontpage.  Good Morning America invites viewers to submit videos of themselves on the “I Say GMA” section of their website.

Read more

Impact of iPhone on AT & T ' s ARPU

I first blogged about the Apple iPhone and the new approach they were taking with AT&T last year. There wasn't much more than a small AT&T logo at the top of the screen to indicate the network. Apple owned the experience and the customer. Customers were paying for the phones in addition to about $20 per month in data access and a voice plan. Things seemed to be working well.

I walked by the Apple store in SF a day before the new 3G version went on sale. There was only one person lined up.  When I walked by the SF store on day #4, however, there were probably 50 or 60 people in line - and this was AFTER Apple and AT&T announced they had already sold one million. I walked by the Apple Store near Central Park on day #10 and there were still police gates to contain what seemed to be more than 100 people still in line. I walked by the same store on day #12, and there was a sign posted out front that said "3G iPhones are not available. Please check online for store availability." So, the line I saw a couple of days before wasn't just Europeans taking advantage of the strong Euro to buy iPods. The device seems to be gaining in popularity as more people get it.

I knew the $199 price tag was attractive, but I thought the $30 per month in data charges alone would slow down registrations. At Jupiter, we've always maintained that consumers will pay for good experiences and that consumers don't simply expect everything for free.

Read more

Categories:

Why Marketing Execs Should Digg Leads

Lauraramos [Posted by Laura Ramos]

I dug Dave Taber’s latest newsletter edition about “The Life of a Lead”.  I mean, I really “Dugg It”.  The article includes a link to digg.com, so I clicked it, registered, and voted for his document. Not simply because I like his ideas, but because I want to experience the “wisdom of crowds” firsthand and see how communal voting might apply to B2B marketing.  You can read more about this if you jump over to Forrester's blog for Interactive Marketing Professionals.

Read more

I Dig Databases And Marketing Qualified Leads

Lauraramos [Posted by Laura Ramos]

I dug Dave Taber’s latest newsletter edition about “The Life of a Lead”.  I mean, I really “Dugg It”.  The article includes a link to digg.com, so I clicked it, registered, and voted for his document. Not simply because I like his ideas, but because I want to experience the “wisdom of crowds” firsthand and see how communal voting might apply to B2B marketing.

Read more

Not *That* Big a Fan....

I'd say over the years Jupiter has been as bullish as anybody on subscription-based on-demand music services, but we're still pretty conservative in our forecasts ($235M in 07 going to, um, maybe $600M in 2012) and analysis, and we may be even more so this year as the number of players shrinks. Don't get me wrong. Rhapsody, Napster, and Zune Pass are great products. For niche audiences, at least as they're priced today. Advertising likely will have to play a much bigger role for them to reach broader audiences.

And we've never been believers that all music will be consumed via subscription-based jukeboxes in the sky. Does anybody say that anymore?

Would You Like Fries with Your News?

Eh, whatever it takes, I guess.

    Two cups of McDonald’s iced coffee (BUY!) sit on the Fox 5 TV news desk, a punch-you-in-the-face product placement (BUY!) to chase down your morning news.

I chuckled more at the Las Vegas Sun's coverage than at the NY Times'. But the Times revealed a bunch of "sinners": Meredith, Tribune, Fox, and Univision.

"I Don't Have SpongeBob. I Have SquishyGuy."

Guess who's side I'm on in this one? That's not a mashup, or commentary, it's thievery ;->

Sue the b@stards!

    Leslie Ann Hooker, a Fort Lauderdale costume-company owner, thought she had found a way to run her business without running into trouble. "I try to make my costumes look 40% different," she said early this month, adding that she didn't explicitly offer trademarked characters: "I don't have SpongeBob. I have SquishyGuy."

Without "no" there is no strategy

[Posted by Steven Noble]

Most interactive agencies owe their success to their tenacity, not strategy.

The cornerstone of strategy is focus, and that involves knowing how to say "no". For example:

  • "We only bid for integrated marketing campaigns, as our main strength is our diverse workforce which allows us to work across marketing disciplines"
  • "Our priority is winning simple, repeatable, web development projects because that allows us to be the cheapest local vendor in this market"
  • "We've walked away from most government and B2B work, because our business is built on creativity and consumer marketers are willing to pay for it"

Offering anything to anyone can be a strategy  — but only if you turn every service into a product, drive inefficiency out of every process, and say "no" to personal service. That doesn't sound like many interactive agencies to me.

Read more

Categories:

NYTimes' iPhone App Does the Job

Thanks to a tip from former Jup, Joe Wilcox, I am now addicted to the New York Times app for the iPhone. Nice clean interface, default tabs include Business and Opinions (wise choices), and....it comes with ads. That you can click through! Wow, this whole mobile marketing thing just might happen after all. Right now, I'm getting a Westin ad with a weak call to action, but a satisfying landing page. It takes up the same space as the tab controls, so about 1/8th of the screen.

Back to the Times app, I find it more satisfying than newspapers on Kindle. Kindle's NY Times was like the worst of both worlds: an RSS experience - that is, stripped down, lacking context and rich storytelling/interactive features - but not fresh either. On Kindle, you get the early edition of the Times, and it doesn't update during the day, even if you download it in the middle of the afternoon. That's a problem that should be fixable.

Read more