Winners of the 2013 Forrester Groundswell Awards

Today at the Forrester eBusiness Forum in Chicago, I had the pleasure of announcing the winners of the 2013 Forrester Groundswell Awards. For the seventh edition of our awards we introduced all new categories, based on Forrester’s Marketing RaDaR model, and the way social programs can support the Marketing RaDaR. So our awards this year included the following categories:

  • Social reach marketing. This category recognizes social programs that effectively delivered marketing messages to new audiences — whether by word of mouth or by using paid social ads.
  • Social depth marketing. This category recognizes social programs that helped prospects explore products in detail and make a purchase decision — such as corporate blogs and communities, and marketers’ on-site ratings and reviews.
  • Social relationship marketing. This category recognizes social programs that engaged existing fans and customers in order to increase their loyalty and lifetime value — something that most commonly happens through branded profiles on social networks like Facebook and Twitter.
  • Mobile. Okay, we admit it: This one’s not necessarily social. But this category recognizes the great use of mobile tools and programs to reach business or marketing goals.
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Twitter Marketers Are Still Looking For Answers

Most of the large marketers we survey tell us their companies are active on Twitter. But just as marketers say they’re not getting enough value from Facebook, Twitter marketers are still looking for greater value as well. In fact, our new report today reveals that only 55% of companies that market on Twitter say they’re satisfied with the business value they achieve:

Why are Twitter marketers still looking for greater value?

  1. Marketers are using Twitter for the wrong objective. Marketers’ most common objective on Twitter is to build brand awareness. But consumers are most likely to become a fan or follower of a company in social media after they’ve already bought from that company. This means that marketers would have more luck using Twitter to engage their existing customers than to find new ones.
  2. Twitter must do more to support marketers. Twitter’s marketing business is still relatively young — its ads have been generally available for only about 3 years — but that business must mature quickly. Marketers say they need more guidance, education, service, and support if they’re going to use Twitter successfully. And just 44% of marketers say they’re satisfied with Twitter as a marketing partner today.
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