Customer Experience Design Lessons From B2C And B2B Award Winners

Business-to-consumer (B2C) financial services provider Ally Bank and business-to-business (B2B) professional services firm PwC Australia took home top honors in the design category of Forrester’s first annual Outside In Awards. In our recent report, Amelia Sizemore and I describe how — despite vastly different business models and target customers — Ally and PwC followed strikingly similar approaches: human-centered design processes that involved a collaborative kickoff stage, extensive research, contributions from customers and multiple parts of the business, and numerous iterations of prototyping and testing. 

Ally evolved its mobile banking app quickly — without sacrificing customer input.

Ally gave itself just nine weeks to design and test its new mobile banking app. Incredibly, team members managed to involve customers during seven out of the project’s nine weeks.

After an initial round of customer interviews, the team asked 10 mobile banking customers to complete a two-week diary study. Participants noted the financial activities they needed to accomplish and sent in photos of places where they wanted — but weren’t able — to bank. Next, the team conducted informal tests of its initial sketches and paper prototypes with a new group of customers. Finally, the team brought yet another group of customers into its usability lab for formal prototype testing.

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Case Study: Innovating The Fast-Casual Restaurant Experience

In 2011, the executives at Bertucci’s, a 30-year-old restaurant chain in the US Mid-Atlantic and New England regions, faced a big problem: The restaurant had become nearly invisible to younger generations of diners. Bright lighting and rows of faux-leather booths beckoned parents with messy young children — not ever-shifting groups of young friends on the move. And its traditional table service felt increasingly irrelevant for diners who wanted to get in and get out — or park themselves for hours with a laptop.

Bertucci’s saw that it had to throw out its old restaurant model in order to court (and keep) a younger generation of diners. Rather than rework its existing locations, the executive team decided to create an entirely new brand. “What we wanted to do is cut the competition off at the pass,” says James Quackenbush, chief development officer of Bertucci’s.

Partnering with design and innovation consultancy Continuum, the firm created a new restaurant concept called 2ovens. The success of the pilot restaurant demonstrates the power of following a structured approach to customer experience innovation.

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