Deciphering The Maze Of Business Intelligence Analytics Technologies

Image from http://loobenji.deviantart.com/art/Maze-130232999Since 2010, when Forrester asks about organizations’ top software priorities, the number one ranked priority has been business intelligence (BI). Continued economic uncertainty and major industry-changing dynamics like mobility and the shift to digital business put a premium on data and information. The ability to effectively extract, analyze, and interpret vast quantities of data has simply become critical to business strategy decisions. Investments in BI analytics reflect the importance being placed on these technologies.
 
However, the large number of analytics technologies at differing levels of maturity and adoption has, in many cases, left planners of BI confused as to which technology should be adopted and for which scenario.
 
As a result, my colleague, Holger Kisker, and I used Forrester’s TechRadar methodology to examine 15 key analytics technologies to identify their usage scenario, current maturity within the enterprise, future trajectory, key vendors, as well as estimated costs for implementation. The technologies analyzed included the following: reporting, dashboards, performance analytics, embedded analytics, web analytics, process analytics, predictive analytics, OLAP, advanced visualization, metadata-generated analytics, location analytics, search/discovery, streaming analytics, nonmodeled data exploration and discovery, and finally text analytics. Forrester clients can read the full report here.
 
Read more

HCL Injects Innovation Into The Next Generation Of Product Development Services

In 2011, Forrester first reported on a new breed of mature and collaborative product development services (PDS) offerings coming to market, which we called “product development services 2.0.” These services are a stark contrast to traditional staff augmentation engagements. How are they different? Providers take greater responsibility for the end-to-end life cycle of the product, promise a higher level of industry and domain expertise, and offer a value-add service addressing key client business concerns. The transition has been gradual up to now, but there are finally signs of a more rapid shift.
 
One of the key announcements made in recent months was HCL’s launch of its “Service Line Unit” (SLU) initiative. Here are the key elements of this initiative:
 
SLUs are a packaged set of PDS offerings, bringing together relevant HCL tools, partnerships, processes, and delivery competencies to address specific pain points.
In developing these offerings, HCL systematically investigated the white space and the key business challenges in its chosen target markets. In turn, it invested in building out its own IP and domain knowledge to address these challenges.
Ultimately, these investments and the targeting of specific business concerns will help HCL frame its service offerings in the context of key business outcomes, such as time-to-market.
 
Read more