Use Cases For Specific BI Tools

I get the following question very often. What are the best practices for creating an enterprise reporting policy as to when to use what reporting tool/application? Alas, as with everything else in business intelligence, the answer is not that easy. The old days of developers versus power users versus casual users are gone. The world is way more complex these days. In order to create such a policy, you need to consider the following dimensions:

  •  Report/analysis type
    • Historical (what happened)
    • Operational (what is happening now)
    • Analytical (why did it happen)
    • Predictive (what might happen)
    • Prescriptive (what should I do about it)
    • Exploratory (what's out there that I don't know about)
  • Interaction types
    • Looking at static report output only
    • Lightly interacting with canned reports (sorting, filtering)
    • Fully interacting with canned reports (pivoting, drilling)
    • Assembling existing report, visualizations, and metrics into customized dashboards
    • Full report authoring capabilities
  • User types
    • Internal
    • External (customers, partners)
  • Data latency
    • Real time
    • Near-real time
    • Batch
  • Report latency, as in need the report:
    • Now
    • Tomorrow
    • In a few days
    • In a few weeks
  • Decision types
    • Strategic (a few complex decisions/reports per month)
    • Tactical (many less-complex decisions/reports per month)
    • Operational (many complex/simple decisions/reports per day)
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Self-Service BI

Traditional BI approaches and technologies — even when using the latest technology, best practices, and architectures — almost always have a serious side effect: a constant backlog of BI requests. Enterprises where IT addresses more than 20% of BI requirements will continue to see the snowball effect of an ever-growing BI requests backlog. Why? Because:

  • BI requirements change faster than an IT-centric support model can keep up. Even with by-the-book BI applications, firms still struggle to turn BI applications on a dime to meet frequently changing business requirements. Enterprises can expect a life span of at least several years out of enterprise resource planning (ERP), customer relationship management (CRM), human resources (HR), and financial applications, but a BI application can become outdated the day it is rolled out. Even within implementation times of just a few weeks, the world may have changed completely due to a sudden mergers and acquisitions (M&A) event, a new competitive threat, new management structure, or new regulatory reporting requirements.
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