The "New Mover" Myth

On January 1st I became a resident of Florida -- my wife and I joke that after the collective 63 years that she, our two kids, and I have spent in New York, that we’re just doing what so many other 63-year-old New Yorkers do -- and headed to the Florida sun. As a migrant, I’ve been closely monitoring the communication that I receive from companies.

So many data and database vendors promote their “new mover” and “pre-mover” offerings that help identify when someone has recently moved house or is about to do so. And although this wasn’t a formal experiment -- and I recognize that I’m a case study of one (or four if you count the family) -- I wanted to observe how companies adjusted their communication once we moved. I should point out that I deliberately didn’t register a change of address with the US Postal Service.

And so far? Zilch. We’ve cancelled and connected cable; switched our address with our credit card issuers, banks, and cell phone companies; registered for new schools; and the only unusual action of late was when American Express denied a charge on my credit card as part of its fraud protection program. Meanwhile, we’ve opened new bank accounts and purchased new appliances, electronics, furniture, and a host of other “new mover” items -- purchase decisions that many marketers would love to have had the opportunity to influence. Again, we may be an isolated case, but if your vendor is selling you “new mover” and “pre-mover” data, have you assessed the quality, timeliness, and accuracy lately?

Meanwhile, if you’re in South Florida, don’t hesitate to look me up!

Cheers,

Dave