Ask Rymer: Let's Figure Out How Apps Are Changing

Monday, May 17: I'm on my way to SAP's SapphireNow to figure out where the world's largest enterprise vendor is taking its customers after buying Sybase. Is SAP's future mobile apps? Newfangled "in-memory" architectures? Cloud-based apps? Or is SAP just grabbing a database to compete with Oracle's?

I know you've got questions too about the future of enterprise applications -- and not just about SAP's direction. I've had many discussions with individual Forrester clients about the future of applications over the years, but never with everyone. Now, OutSystems and I have come up with a new use of social media to open the doors on a worldwide Q&A on the future of applications.  Visit What's the Future of Applications? Ask Rymer for details.

We call it "social consulting."  Here is how it works: 

1. During the next week, visit the "Ask Rymer" site and post your biggest, baddest questions about the future of applications. We've got to account for change agents ranging from the Apple iPad to Smart Computing approaches to cloud computing to Lean Software to understand the future of applications. And we've got to continue our progress toward software that is designed for people and built for continuous change.

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Platform-As-A-Service, Chapter 2

Platform-as-a-service -- application development platforms running in clouds -- are entering a new phase of evolution, and not a moment too soon. I've become interested in a new set of products I'm calling "adaptive PaaS" (for lack of a better term) that I think will make the benefits of cloud computing available to a lot more development shops. I'm doing a webinar on this topic May 20th with Appistry's Sam Charrington. I hope you can join the discussion.

As I described in my early reports on PaaS, these products include full development tooling, runtime services, and administration and management tools. While complete, most of these "full PaaS" products are best for new applications, and they incorporate much proprietary technology. Consequence: Many if not most clients are still saying "no" to PaaS for two reasons.

  1. Lock-in: PaaS products lock up your code in a single provider's environment.
  2. Poor fit: Too many PaaS products just aren't strong for core business applications, particularly for rehosting existing applications.

These limitations often prompt developers who want the flexibility of cloud computing to use IaaS platforms like Amazon EC2 instead of PaaS. With IaaS, developers can code in the language and frameworks they choose, reducing lock-in and ensuring a good platform-application fit. As a result, while we see both interest and adoption of software-as-a-service (full applications) and infrastructure-as-a-service (virtual servers, storage, and networks), PaaS is lagging in adoption.

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