What's Holding Back Next Generation Backup and Recovery?

I talk with many IT professionals that are dismayed at how little backup and recovery has changed in the last ten years. Most IT organizations still run traditional weekly fulls and daily incremental backups, they still struggle to meet backup windows and to improve recovery capabilities, to improve backup and restore success rates and to keep up with data growth. Sure there have been some improvements the shift to disk as the primary target for backup did improve backup and recovery performance, but it hasn't fundamentally changed backup operations or addressed the most basic backup challenges. Why hasn't disk dragged backup out of the dark ages? Well, disk alone can't address some of the underlying causes. Unfortunately, many IT organizations:

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Measuring Disaster Recovery Maturity

Each year for the past three years I've analyzed and written on the state of enterprise disaster recovery preparedness. I've seen a definite improvement in overall DR preparedness during these past three years. Most enterprises do have some kind of recovery data center, enterprises often use an internal or colocated recovery data center to support advanced DR solutions such as replication and more "active-active" data center configurations and finally, the distance between data centers is increasing. As much as things have improved, there is still a lot more room for improvement not just in advanced technology adoption but also in DR process management. I typically find that very few enterprises are both technically sophisticated and good at managing DR as an on-going process.

When it comes to DR planning and process management, there are a number of standards including the British Standard for IT Service Continuity Management (BS 25777), other country standards and even industry specific standards. British Standards have a history of evolving into ISO standards and there has already been widespread acceptance of BS 25777 as well as BS 25999 (the business continuity version). No matter which standard you follow, I don’t think you can go drastically wrong. DR planning best practices have been well defined for years and there is a lot of commonality in these standards. They will all recommend:

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