Made-up Mobile Ad Network Numbers - Why?

Saw this article today in moco ranking mobile ad networks in the US. They published these numbers, but don't stand behind them - at least entirely. I'm interested in digging a bit deeper into the UV calculation.

  1. Millennial Media: 45.6 million
  2. AOL/Platform-A's Third Screen Media: 28.6 million
  3. AdMob: 25.7 million
  4. Microsoft's MSN Ad Network: 25.4 million
  5. Jumptap: 23.4 million
  6. Quattro Wireless: 23 million

Yahoo! isn't mentioned. Google is not there - guess this doesn't include Search, but these online giants are popular at least with the consumers we survey. Oh, and no application networks or SMS. The article does back up Millennial's claim to reach. They'd have to be reaching just about every person who browses the mobile web in a given month - even those with one page view - to hit this published number. Aside from the rankings, good to see all of the networks doing so well. These numbers have been growing steadily over the past couple of years. With smartphones selling so well, usage of data services is growing. Forrester's data shows relatively few daily browsers outside of smartphone owners. Most of these ad networks show similar usage patterns. All of this traffic together Choosing ad networks isn't a topic I've researched yet. We do advocate though that brands find their customers, understand their mobile behaviors, and build a strategy from there. With the momentum in consumer adoption of mobile data services, it will soon be hard for any consumer or business-oriented brand to avoid the medium as a channel to engage with consumers for much longer.

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So... Why This Blog?

The views expressed on this website/weblog are mine alone and do not necessarily reflect the views of my employer, Forrester Research.

I started this blog because I am passionate about how technology - specifically wireless - can impact businesses and how they engage with their customers. I worked as a management consultant for a number of years before becoming a wireless industry analyst at Jupiter Research. At Jupiter, I found that I was spending a lot of time interpreting our technology (and in my case wireless) research for regular consumer product and service companies. I figured, "why not write mobile research directly for these non-telco companies," as I call them.

In 2006, I launched mobile marketing and media coverage at Jupiter. When Forrester Research acquired Jupiter Research in August 2008, I decided with my corporate transition to make a coverage transition as well. I wanted to expand upon this research I'd started at Jupiter and look at mobile strategies more broadly. I wanted to conduct research and advise our clients on how mobile can help them achieve a wide range of business objectives.

Every consumer product and services company should be considering how they will engage with their customers within the mobile environment. Many clients ask me, "How will I know when I should have a mobile presence?" I ask, "How did you know when you needed a Web presence? Was it when 5% of your customers were online? 10% Was it when your competitors had a website? When did you decide to add rich media to your website? What percentage of your customers was connecting via broadband?" I ask many of our clients this question. The answer with most is, "The decision was strategic. We knew we needed a web presence. We sensed that the Internet would be an important medium for us to engage with our customers." Mobile will be the same. A mobile presence isn't table stakes today, but it will be.

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