Bloggers' Dinner in Tokyo - Oct 22, 2008 (Wed)

Jeremiahowyang_5My colleague, Jeremiah Owyang is coming to Japan so we're going to have an informal, no-host bloggers' dinner on Wednesday, October 22nd in Tokyo.

Jeremiah is a senior analyst at Forrester Research. He helps interactive marketers get to grips with Social computing, Social media measurement, Web marketing, and Interactive marketing. He also writes an excellent blog of his own - Web Strategy by Jeremiah.

Our plan for the evening is that Jeremiah will talk for about 20 minutes to share some insights on trends in social computing. And then we hope to have a stimulating discussion on any topics that interest us -- in other words, all things social. No sales pitches allowed!

If you want to attend, please contact Ritsuko Tague at rtague@forrester.com with your name, company name, email address and the URL of your blog by October 3rd.

<Bloggers' Dinner in Tokyo>

Date & Time :  Wednesday, October 22nd,  19:00-21:00

Location:  FUJIMAMAS, 6-3-2 Jingumae, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo    MAP

Tel: 03.5485.2283

Cost:  4,000JPY - includes an Asian Tapas buffet and free bar (nomihodai).

Attendees: 20-25 bloggers

Agenda:

19:00-19:20 Jeremiah's welcome speech

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Chinese food scandals

A change in tone for my blog today. This story with links is more to do with Corporate Social Responsibility than Customer Experience. It just happens to be what's on my mind right now...

If it weren't for the financial melt down, I'm sure that the tainted milk scandal would be top of the news agenda in Japan today. This isn't the first time that the safety of Chinese products has come into question - and it won't be the last.

If customers don't trust your company, it's bound to be bad for business. The FEER blog points to a noodle shop in Hong Kong, which is seeking to reassure customers by printing expiry dates on the noodles themselves.

But how does one deal with a collapse of trust in an entire country? Whenever a new scare threatens Chinese exports, we hear about new legislation, increased inspections, and draconian punishments. But it seems that the underlying problems are endemic and can't be easily rooted out.

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