TechnoPolitics Podcast: The Mobile Banking Mindshift

Mike Gualtieri

Click. That’s the sound of me taking a picture of a check with my smartphone to make a bank deposit. Mobile banking is getting very interesting and innovative, which is why one in four US adults are active mobile bankers. It’s only going to get bigger and better, says Forrester senior analyst and mobile banking expert Peter Wannemacher. He says, “Mobile banking will become the hub of many customers’ banking relationships.” And he has some strong advice for banking executives who too often have a haphazard mobile strategy. In this episode, TechnoPolitics asks Peter:

  • How is mobile banking adoption progressing?
  • How is innovation in mobile banking (such as mobile deposit) is driving consumers to mobile-first banking?
  • What should banking executives do to dominate the future of mobile banking?
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Information Fabric 3.0 Delivers The Next Generation Of Data Virtualization

Noel Yuhanna

For decades, firms have deployed applications and BI on independent databases and warehouses, supporting custom data models, scalability, and performance while speeding delivery. It’s become a nightmare to try to integrate the proliferation of data across these sources in order to deliver the unified view of business data required to support new business applications, analytics, and real-time insights. The explosion of new sources, driven by the triple-threat trends of mobile, social, and the cloud, amplified by partner data, market feeds, and machine-generated data, further aggravates the problem. Poorly integrated business data often leads to poor business decisions, reduces customer satisfaction and competitive advantage, and slows product innovation — ultimately limiting revenue.

Forrester’s latest research reveals how leading firms are coping with this explosion using data virtualization, leading us to release a major new version of our reference architecture, Information Fabric 3.0. Since Forrester invented the category of data virtualization eight years ago with the first version of information fabric, these solutions have continued to evolve. In this update, we reflect new business requirements and new technology options including big data, cloud, mobile, distributed in-memory caching, and dynamic services. Use information fabric 3.0 to inform and guide your data virtualization and integration strategy, especially where you require real-time data sharing, complex business transactions, more self-service access to data, integration of all types of data, and increased support for analytics and predictive analytics.

Information fabric 3.0 reflects significant innovation in data virtualization solutions, including:

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Podcast: The Intersection of Customer Experience and Business Technology

Stephen Powers

As organizations continue their journey in the Age of the Customer, business technology leaders have a challenge ahead of them. As my colleague Harley Manning wrote in his blog earlier this week, "The quality of customer interactions with your brand results from a complex system of interdependent people, processes, policies, and technology that we call the ‘customer experience ecosystem.’"

Technology leaders have the responsibility to work with marketing and business colleagues to ensure that technology enables the business, and to align technology priorities with customer experience-related business goals. They need to understand the right organizational structures, the right blend of technologies (forget about a single “customer Experience Management” suite – it just doesn’t exist), and when to bring in outside help.

I sat down with Harley, a Vice President and Research Director on our Customer Experience team, to discuss the role of business technology professionals in a company’s customer experience strategy. You can hear our podcast in its entirety below (Episode 1), or choose a topic-sized cuts (Episodes 2, 3, and 4).

You can also download the podcasts through iTunes and subscribe to Forrester's podcast series

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Drive Customer Experiences With Better Technology

Stephen Powers

The Age of the Customer is upon us and as a result, market leading strategies for mobile, big data, and customer experience are now required to satisfy an increasingly demanding client base.

Traditionally, IT organizations have existed to support internal operations but in today’s landscape, the technology leaders at the head of these organizations must play a key role when it comes to delivering solutions that support better external customer experiences. However, our research shows that most companies lack the sound technology strategies needed to effectively support the initiatives laid out by their peers in marketing and other lines of business.  

With business partners in need of help, it’s up to technology leaders to help identify and deliver solutions that will give their companies the competitive edge in the Age of the Customer. This fall, Forrester will host a Forum for Application Development & Delivery Professionals that will focus specifically on the top technologies, skills and practices you will need to take a leadership role in the development of world-class customer experiences at your company.

 The forum will address :

  • How to build new design competencies, architectures, and teams focused on the customer experience, and why it’s an opportunity as well as an obligation.
  • Why big data and analytics are key to supporting customer experience technology solutions, including predictive applications.
  • How to prepare for the mobile revolution by designing and delivering world-class, contextual solutions.
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Are You Doing Techie Integration Or *Business* Integration?

Randy Heffner

“Figuring out how to think about the problem.” That’s what Albert Einstein said when asked what single event was most helpful in developing the Theory of Relativity. Application integration is a problem. A big problem. Not to mention data, B2B, and other domains of integration. As an industry analyst and solution architect, what I’m most interested in first is how to think about the problem.

Pop Quiz: The Goal of Integration

Which of the following statements best articulates the goal of integration strategy?

  1. The goal of integration is to keep data in sync across two or more siloed applications.
  2. The goal of integration is to improve business outcomes by achieving consistent, coherent, effective business operations.

The correct answer is B. Was that too easy? Apparently not, because most of the integration strategies I see are framed as if the answer were A. Most, but not all — and it’s the ones framed around B that I’m most interested in. Here’s the difference:

  • A-style integration centers on technology. It begins with data and business logic fractured across application silos, and then asks, “How can integration technologies make it easier to live with this siloed mess?”
  • B-style integration centers on business design. It begins with a businessperson’s view of well-oiled business operations: streamlined processes, consistent transactions, unified tools for each user role, purpose-built views of data, and the like. It designs these first — that is, it centers on business design — and then asks, “How can integration technologies give us coherent business operations despite our application silos?”
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IT Salaries in Australia and New Zealand – Paying A Premium for Value

Michael Barnes

In Q4 2012, Forrester interviewed over 2,800 senior IT and business decision-makers across Asia Pacific, including 250 senior IT decision-makers with budgetary authority in Australia and New Zealand (A/NZ). Respondents included a mix of small and medium-sized businesses (SMBs) and large organizations, with all major vertical market segments represented. On average, 6% of A/NZ respondents’ total budget is currently spent on IT (including both operating and capital budgets). Of that total IT budget, an average of 26% is targeted at new initiatives, versus 52% targeting ongoing operations and maintenance and 22% targeting capacity replacement & expansion.

While these findings are interesting, the expected spending on IT staff salaries is what really stands out. Our Forrsights data shows spending on IT salaries in A/NZ rising far faster than all other IT-related line items (see Figure 1). This is not an anomaly. In fact, it’s a sign of things to come.

 

 

There are several likely reasons for this dynamic:

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Will Privacy Concerns Stop Or Stunt The Power Of Predictive Analytics

Mike Gualtieri

The power of predictive analytics in the age of Big Data is super-cool, but will privacy concerns stop or stunt it's adoption? Watch this episode of Forrester TechnoPolitics with Eric Siegel, author of Predictive Analytics: The Power to Predict Who Will Click, Lie, Buy, or Die to find out. 

About Forrester TechnoPolitics

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Moneyball, Big Data, And The Data Scientist

Mike Gualtieri

Ari Kaplan is a real moneyball guy. As President of Ariball, he has worked with more than half of all the MLB organizations to evaluate players for maximum return on the baseball club's investment. But, Ari is much more than just a moneyball guy, he is also a computer scientist, a data scientist, and has the business acumen to produce dramatic results for the teams he works with. He is the real deal. Forrester TechnoPolitics caught up with Ari at Predictive Analytics World in Chicago to ask him how Big Data and the role of the data scientist will advance the science of moneyball. 

About Forrester TechnoPolitics

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Maximize Your Chances Of Business Intelligence Success

Martha Bennett

Too little data, too much data, inaccessible data, reports and dashboard that take too long to produce and often aren’t fit for purpose, analytics tools that can only be used by a handful of trained specialists – the list of complaints about business intelligence (BI) delivery is long, and IT is often seen as part of the problem. At the same time, BI has been a top implementation priority for organizations for a number of years now, as firms clearly recognize the value of data and analytics when it comes to improving decisions and outcomes.

So what can you do to make sure that your BI initiative doesn't end up on the scrap heap of failed projects? Seeking answers to this question isn't unique to BI projects — but there is an added sense of urgency in the BI context, given that BI-related endeavors are typically difficult to get off the ground, and there are horror stories aplenty of big-ticket BI investments that haven’t yielded the desired benefit.

In a recent research project, we set out to discover what sets apart successful BI projects from those that struggle. The best practices we identified may seem obvious, but they are what differentiates those whose BI projects fail to meet business needs (or fail altogether) from those whose projects are successful. Overall, it’s about finding the right balance between business and IT when it comes to responsibilities and tasks – neither party can go it alone. The six key best practices are:

·         Put the business into business intelligence.

·         Be agile, and aim to deliver self-service.

·         Establish a solid foundation for your data as well your BI initiative.

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Part 2: Testing Tools Market Landscape: It's all about change!

Diego Lo Giudice

What a strange summer this has been! From Boston to London to Paris to Turin, the weather has offered weekly and even daily reversals, with continuous change from sun to rain, from hot and damp to cool and crisp. I missed a nice spring season. Even today, from 35º-38º Celsius (95º-100º Fahrenheit), we just went to 22º Celsius (71º Fahrenheit) with a perfect storm! A continuous climate and sudden change is quite unusual in some of these countries. Certainly it is where the Azores Anticyclone usually dominates from mid-late June to mid-late August, offering a stable summer. How many times have you had to change plans because you discover weather is about to change!?

You might be thinking, "What does this have to do with this AD&D blog?" It’s about change! I am wondering if, in our daily lives, getting used to unexpected conditions and having to handle continuous change favors a mindset where change is just something we have to deal with and not fight. A new mindset very much needed given the change we see ahead in how we develop, test, and deploy software!

My focus in this blog is testing, although the first change we need to get used to is that we can’t talk any longer about testing in an isolated fashion! Testing is getting more and more interconnected in a continuous feedback loop with development and deployment. (See my colleague Kurt Bittner's report on continuous delivery; I could not agree more with what Kurt says there!)

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