CX Interview On Designing The Human-Machine Interface With Parrish Hanna Of Ford Motor Company

Parrish Hanna is the global director for human machine interface at Ford Motor. Parrish and his team guide the design and development of the interior interactive experiences for all Ford and Lincoln vehicles. Through the synthesis of emerging technologies, consumer understanding, and thoughtful physical and digital design, they ensure clarity, ease of use, meaning, value, and safety. We sat down to talk more about the role of design leading up to Parrish’s keynote at CXNYC 2015.

Q: The car is a very personal object. How do human-centered design methods fit into the context of the work that you do?

A: For me, I skipped the whole design thinking thread, because that was just always how I worked and thought — this very iterative, user-centered design being informed by qualitative and quantitative understanding, continuously doing generative, iterative, formative, and evaluative measurement while progressing through research toward understanding. But what’s interesting about our space is what resonates is actually designing for experiences through the application of science, the translation to engineering, and the emotion of design. To me, ease of use and intuitiveness and task completion are just the cost of entry. Beyond that, how do you imbue this much deeper, richer emotional connection to the brand, product, or service or to the experience itself? And for us, it’s in the context of the automotive ecosystem, which is a mobility ecosystem, compared to, say, a transactional website or a retail experience.

Q: How do you go about doing that?

Read more

CX Interview On IBM Design Thinking And Designcamp With Charlie Hill Of IBM

Charlie Hill is a software product designer and an advocate for user-centric product development. As distinguished engineer and chief technical officer for design, Charlie is helping to build a world-class design capability across IBM. Charlie leads development and worldwide implementation of IBM Design Thinking, IBM's cross-disciplinary product development practice. We sat down to talk more about design thinking leading up to Charlie’s keynote at CXNYC 2015.

Photo of Charlie HillQ: In the process of bringing hundreds of new designers into the IBM product teams, you’ve created a structured program around onboarding and general training. Can you tell us more about that program and how it started?

A: There are two related things that we focus on: education and activation. Broadly speaking, we look for ways to scale our approach to onboarding design talent and empowering teams with design thinking practices. Those practices are not just for designers. They’re practices that bring the whole team together — and that includes business people such as product managers, engineers writing code, release managers, and architects — as well as designers. When we started our program, we pretty much handcrafted the first few projects. We focused on figuring out how to apply design methods effectively, which led us to create IBM Design Thinking. Then, we needed to create education offerings that bring IBM Design Thinking to a larger group of projects in a scalable way. All our education offerings are now under the Designcamp banner.

Q: How does Designcamp work? Is there just one Designcamp?

Read more

CX Interview On Customer-Centric Design With Kit Hickey Of Ministry Of Supply

Kit Hickey is the co-founder of Ministry of Supply, a menswear brand which creates technically advanced professional clothing. Passionate about how people experience their clothing, Kit leads all facets of customer experience and is the head and heart behind Ministry of Supply’s customer-centric approach, constantly working to incorporate insights that lead to the next generation of clothes. We sat down to talk more about customer-centric design leading up to Kit’s keynote at CXNYC 2015.

Photo of Kit HickeyQ: You’ll be speaking at CXNYC 2015 about your iterative design process, which relies heavily on customer feedback. Can you talk about how this plays out both for your company and your customers?

Read more

CX Interview On Simplicity With Mark McCormick Of Wells Fargo

Mark McCormick, newly in the position of head of user experience for wholesale Internet services at Wells Fargo, has led customer experience teams for 20 years, the past 12 of which have been at Wells Fargo. He specializes in managing large research, design, and content strategy teams and driving cultural values and practices around customer centricity, innovation, and, lately, simplicity. We sat down to talk more about simplicity leading up to Mark’s keynote at CXNYC 2015

Photo of Mark McCormickQ: You’ll be speaking about ethnographic research at the CXNYC 2015 Forum. Could you give us some background on the role of research at Wells Fargo, particularly as it relates to design?

A: Ethnography is an enabler to design and decision-making. Design and research have always gone hand in glove at Wells Fargo, usually reporting to the same manager and working in tandem on projects. But when I talk about research, I’m referring to a few different kinds of research. In the case of usability, there needs to be a bit of a wall between the designers and research in order to maintain the objectivity that’s needed. With ethnography on the other hand, ideally you would have designers, executives, and product teams all in the field, side by side with researchers. With that kind of research, and with the rich qualitative data that comes out of it, it is extremely fruitful if you get designers and researchers parsing the data together. Then everyone has a stake in it, and if they have a stake in the data, they end up using it.

Read more

How To Be A Great Client: Tales From Both Sides Of The Fence

I’ve had the chance over the years to see both sides of the client/design agency relationship. I began my career at Ralph Appelbaum Associates, a world-renowned museum exhibition planning and design firm, working with clients like the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, the American Museum of Natural History, and the Museum of African American History in Detroit. What I loved about those projects was getting to work with multiple teams on a variety of projects with different subject matters. When you’ve spent the afternoon listening to famed astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson wax poetic about the planets as you prepare exhibits for the Rose Center for Earth and Space, you realize life can be pretty good.

Read more

Design Thinking Drives Innovation With Drop, A Connected Kitchen Product

Sculture at Staunton FarmAfter a gorgeous long fall weekend tramping around ponds and through pastures in search of sculpture, while oohing and aahing over the upstate New York autumnal palette of greens, yellows, oranges, and reds, I got a nice welcome back to work today. My first Forrester report is live on our client site! It’s a case study on Drop, an iPad-connected kitchen scale and recipe app, which was developed by a small team based in Ireland and is currently in pre-order.

Read more

Data Is Beautiful (Or At Least, It Can Be)

The Eyeo Festival took place in Minneapolis last week. I missed it. I missed it for a very good reason, which is that I just started a new job as a Principal Analyst at Forrester Research. But I still followed from afar, wishing I could hear firsthand about some of the fantastic projects and ideas that get presented there (and I’ll certainly check out the videos as they get posted).

What is the Eyeo Festival, you might be wondering? It’s a small annual conference that “brings together creative coders, data designers, and creators working at the intersection of data, art, and technology for inspiring talks, workshops, labs, and events.” I’ve been to two out of the four conferences and have come away both times incredibly inspired and impressed. This is not just big data. This is big, beautiful, informative data. The coders, designers, and creators both at Eyeo and elsewhere provide living proof that big (and small) data doesn’t have to be ugly, messy, or impossible to understand.

It can have an emotional impact and make a point like this project by Kim Rees and Periscopic, which uses mortality data from the World Health Organization to estimate the number of years lost to gun deaths in 2013 alone.

U.S. Gun Deaths in 2013

Read more