Engagement is the theme for Enterprise Architecture today

Alex Cullen

I’m seeing many signs of an evolving role and recognition for enterprise architecture.  This is changing how we ourselves see the practice of EA.

For example, one of the more frequent inquiries I get from EA leaders is around customer experience and the customer lifecycle - where our clients want to know how EA should help translate business customer experience goals into architecture.  Our inquiries around mobile are less around the technology and more around shaping an enterprise digital strategy.  The questions we get around Big Data have shifted from technology towards how gain better insights on a company’s markets.  

‘Engagement’ is the underlying theme of this evolution.  Companies need to build Systems of Engagement - and EAs are at the front-lines of decisions.  But also, EAs are stepping  up their engagement with their business leaders to provide the value their busness needs. 

If you also see this evolution, and are successfully addressing engagement of either form in your EA program, I’d like to invite you to submit your story for the 2014 Enterprise Architecture Award, sponsored by Forrester Research, InfoWorld and Penn State University’s Center for Enterprise Architecture.

As with previous years, we are recognizing leading EA programs, not a specific project.  We’d like to hear from programs that:

  • Have re-shaped how their business plans and governs business technology strategy
  • Have  helped their organization move from ‘mobile as a project’ to ‘mobile as an enterprise strategy’
Read more

Facebook Is Still Failing Marketers

Nate Elliott

Our declaration last October that Facebook was failing marketers and that brands should focus their social efforts elsewhere created a lot of discussion. To no one's surprise, most of the people defending Facebook were vendors that rely directly upon Facebook marketing for their livelihood.

Just four months later, the debate seems to be over. Is there any doubt now that Facebook has abandoned social marketing, and that its paid ad products aren’t delivering results for most marketers? Consider:

  • Marketers can now reach just 6% of their fans organically. When we published our research, some brands were surprised to find that Facebook only delivered posts to 16% of their fans. In December a leaked sales deck revealed that Facebook was telling marketers they should expect organic distribution of posts to decline further — but few could guess how far and how fast that distribution would fall. This month, Ogilvy released data showing that the brand pages they manage reach just 6% of fans. For pages with more than 500,000 fans, Ogilvy says reach stands at just 2%.
Read more

How is an earthquake triggered in Silicon Valley turning your company into a software vendor?

James Staten

A movement that began in Silicon Valley, is starting to have profound impacts on corporations throughout the world that are far from obvious but critical to your success and maybe even your company’s survival. This is a massive shift that all CIOs need to start preparing for - a seismic shift that is documented in my latest report released to clients this week. 

As we enter the age of the customer we are leveraging cloud, mobile and big data technologies to build better and more complete experiences with our customers. In doing so we are creating new digital experiences, radically different interactions, and redefining what our companies do and how they should be viewed. Nike’s FuelBand is both a device and a collaboration solution (that’s why Under Armour bought MapMyFitness). Siemens Medical’s MRI machines are both a camera (of sorts) and a content management system  Heck, even a Citibank credit card is both a payment tool and an online financial application. Any company that is embracing the age of the customer is quickly learning that you can’t do that without software. 

Read more

New Research: CISOs Need To Add Customer Obsession To Their Job Description

Edward Ferrara

The CISO And The Customer

Next month Forrester will publish research focusing on the role the customer plays in security planning. Customer attitudes are changing, and companies need to recognize these changes or risk losing customers. These changes put enormous attention on the CISO and the security team. But CISOs should also look at this as a big opportunity for CISOs to move from the back office to the front office. Security incidents, managed well, can actually enhance customer perceptions of a company; managed poorly, they can be devastating. If customers lose trust in a company because of the way the business handles personal data and privacy, they will easily take their business elsewhere. Sales will fall, stock prices will follow, and the CISO will be accountable. CISOs need to improve their security program by focusing on the company’s true customers – the ones that create revenue – clarifying and speeding communications and implementing customer-focused security controls.  Look for it next month!

Google Bets Big On "Data Out" And The Database Of Affinity

Nate Elliott

Last week we published a report on how "data in, data out" practices are the future of social relationship platforms  and just a week later, Google has made a big bet on the "data out" side of that equation. 

In the report, we say that "'data out' will prove the value of social and improve the rest of your marketing [. . .] [by] powering effective targeting in everything from banner ads to TV spots." Readers familiar with our research will know we're talking about the database of affinity: a catalogue of people's tastes and preferences, collected by observing their social behaviors, that could revolutionize brand advertising.

Well, last night, Google announced it was shifting the focus of its Wildfire division (previously a full-service social relationship platform) away from managing brands' profiles on social networks and toward extracting social data to help it better build the database of affinity.

Read more

Is All Work Becoming Knowledge Work?

Craig Le Clair

 

It hit me the other day when I was speaking with a call center operator about my reservation. She was funny, smart, well informed and flew around her app. with the quickness of the chipmunk. She is the new breed of worker. Not the production worker that performs repetitive tasks, like data entry and responding to the same dumb information requests, anxious to get you off the phone to meet a call duration metric. No, our relentless offshoring, automation, and customer self-service is slowly eliminating this type of worker.

We hear numbers like this consistently, and this from a Workforce Planning  VP at a major Major Telecommunications company,

“Today  70% of our inquiries are handled by self service (IVR, Web, or mobile) with only 30% that ever get to our call center.  But these calls that get through are really hard. The customer has researched the problem on line and is ready to have a deep conversation. So unfortunately, even though the call volumes are way down, the number of agents we need has not decreased due to how complex these calls are. "

What does this mean for enterprises? High performance will be achieved supporting these workers with advanced information management and solutions like Dynamic Case Management that give them freedom to make decisions and advance the customer experience.  

We will shortly publish a wave on DCM. Look for some new European solutions like BeInformed (Netherlands), Whitestein (Germany), and ISIS (Austria) to gain ground on  PegaSystems, IBM, EMC, Appian  and others from the traditional BPM market.

Target Breach: Vendors, You're Not Wrestlers, And This Isn't The WWE

Rick Holland

Yesterday, Bloomberg Businessweek ran a story providing some alarming details on the Target breach.  The article, “Missed Alarms and 40 Million Stolen Credit Card Numbers: How Target Blew It,” didn’t paint a pretty picture of Target’s response. 

Some of the highlights in case you haven't read it yet: 

  • Six months before the incident, Target invested $1.6 million in FireEye technology.
  • Target had a team of security specialists in Bangalore monitoring the environment.
  • On Saturday November 30, FireEye identified and alerted on the exfiltration malware. By all accounts this wasn't sophisticated malware; the article states that even Symantec Endpoint Protection detected it. 
Read more

Join Our Global Mobile Executive Survey

Thomas Husson

For the past few years, Forrester has fielded a Global Mobile Executive Survey to understand and benchmark mobile initiatives. Last year, my colleague Julie Ask and I surveyed nearly 300 executives leading mobile initiatives within their enterprises.

To help business executives benchmark and mature their mobile strategy and services, we are updating this survey.

Planning and organizing for the use of mobile technologies is a complex task. Integrating mobile as part of a broader corporate strategy is even more complex. However, some players are leading the way and working on infrastructure, staffing, and competencies that are hard to see unless you look closely. If you want to understand the role that mobile is playing in various organizations, what their objectives are, how they measure the success of their mobile initiatives, and a lot more, you just have to share with us your own perspective and we will aggregate the answers.

For your efforts, we will share a free copy of the survey results.

If you’re in charge of your company's mobile consumer initiative or if you’re familiar with it, then please take this survey.

Click here to start the questionnaire.

If you’re not familiar with your company’s mobile consumer approach, please forward this survey to the relevant colleagues who are in charge of defining or implementing your mobile consumer approach.

·         The survey takes less than 20 minutes to complete.

·         The survey will be live until April 18, 2014.

Read more

Benchmark Your Applications Portfolio

George Lawrie

Do you ever wonder how your business applications portfolio stacks up against your peers?

We conducted a series of interviews to understand how firms measure applications portfolio coverage of their business units and business models, end-user use of applications, and business value. We’re inviting application leaders to take a 10 to 15 minute survey anonymously to give their feedback on the metrics and their own estimate of their scores. We plan to aggregate the data then slice and dice by size or SIC or other “firmographics,” so that you can compare yourself with similar firms.

Dozens of your peers have already completed the survey and we want to write the report next week. But it's not too late. You can still join the fun here :

 https://forrester.az1.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_3rWh3knhUv6w4h7

Competition For The Established CIA Triad

Andrew Rose

The information security profession is built on three fundamental tenets, those of confidentiality, availability, and integrity. Increasingly, however, I see two things happening:

-       Organizations are reprioritising these to reflect their significance within their organization, with confidentiality often trailing to availability and integrity; or

-       Additional aspects such as authentication, authorization, non-repudiation etc. are supplementing the CIA triad.

It seems that there may be a growing group of S&R professionals who are dissatisfied with these concepts, feeling that they are ambiguous or incomplete, and some find it troublesome that they lack standard units of measurement.

It was with interest, therefore, that I noted a competition issued by the O-ISM3 Consortium, an organization that focuses on fostering alignment between security objectives and business goals. Their challenge lays out a use case for participants to navigate. It involves a mock audit on a travel company and presents entrants with the audit findings. The participants are then challenged to create a set of audit questions that would lead to these responses, but they have to choose one of two alternative paths – either their questions must all include references to C, I, and A, or none of them may.

Read more