Showrooming drives online sales in Europe

Michael O'Grady

Retailers are increasingly reconfiguring their physical stores to support the multichannel shopper. Our Forrester Data: Showrooming Forecast, 2016 to 2021(EU-7) shows that three-quarters of EU-7 online sales, worth 126 billion euros in 2015 are impacted by offline research. Reverse-showrooming, where shoppers buy at a physical store following online research, is even more commonplace. Price is the overriding factor that drives showrooming behaviour. Our report analyses the factors that contribute to offline influence and its implications for multi-channel retailers:

  • Offline influence dominates the retail landscape. In 2015, more than 95% of retail sales in EU-7 either occurred offline or occurred online and were influenced by offline research. This figure is more than double the share of sales that occurred online or that occurred offline and were influenced by online research.
  • Declining foot traffic and high-street spending threatens in-store influence. In-store visits and sales advice from an in-store sales associate are key drivers of offline influence. In 2015, foot traffic in physical stores fell across UK, Germany and France and visits to UK high-street stores declined.
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Google’s Next Play: Your Assistant For Everything - Not Just Answers

Michael Facemire

This blog post is co-authored by VP and Principal Analyst Julie Ask and Analyst Andrew Hogan at Forrester.

Google held an event in San Francisco this week to announce several new consumer products – a smartphone, a wireless speaker, Wi-Fi routers, a virtual reality headset and an updated Chromecast solution. All showcased an emerging strategic direction for Google and some killer engineering and design skills.

None of it impressed as much as the demos of Google Assistant – Google’s virtual assistant.

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Google's Next Play: Your Assistant For Everything - Not Just Answers

Julie Ask

This blog post is co-authored by VP and Principal Analyst Michael Facemire and Analyst Andrew Hogan at Forrester.

Google held an event in San Francisco this week to announce several new consumer products – a smartphone, a wireless speaker, Wi-Fi routers, a virtual reality headset and an updated Chromecast solution. All showcased an emerging strategic direction for Google and some killer engineering and design skills.

None of it impressed as much as the demos of Google Assistant – Google’s virtual assistant.

What is a virtual assistant, you ask? A virtual assistant is another name for an intelligent (personal) assistant. Virtual assistants orchestrate agents or services from third parties on behalf of consumers. Bots are one form of an agent. Virtual assistants rely on context (e.g., user input, localization capabilities, and access to information from a variety of data sources) to refine the quality of responses to a user’s requests. These assistants guess, but the guesses get better over time. “Virtual” implies that the service is digital and not performed by a human you’ve hired.

Google Assistant is a natural extension of Google’s path towards becoming the agent that sits between brands and their customers. The “holy grail” of becoming a consumer’s primary virtual assistant will be hard for Google to obtain, but holds unprecedented business value. Google is not alone in this race – Amazon, Apple and Facebook in the U.S. also have their sights set on being the trusted assistant for consumers.

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Field Service: Increasingly Important For Differentiated Customer Service Experiences

Kate Leggett

Field service technologies are more than two decades old. Companies have leveraged them to coordinate the flow of work orders that came in as service requests to the contact center. They were able to reap real ROI by using these technologies to schedule technicians, manage their routes and their flow of work. 

Today, with the rise in importance of delivering differentiated customer experiences, field service technologies are become increasingly important. This is because, the service tech who ends up on your doorstep, or at the site of faulty equipment represents the face of your company. They are your brand ambassadors. These interactions are by far the most personal channel for customer engagement, and they can help make or break a relationship.

This means that: (1) you want to equip your service techs with all the information and data that they need to easily address the reported issue, and (2) you want to use cutting edge technologies to deliver great engagement.  These technologies include:

  • Mobility for field service effectiveness - Companies communicate to field techs, increasingly via mobile apps, the location, timing, and details of their jobs. They also allow techs to provide dynamic pricing of labor, parts, and products. Mobile applications must be easy for techs to use, often with gloved hands, in challenging conditions including low lighting and hazardous job sites. They must also work in disconnected environments.
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Manufacturing Firms Could Do Better With A Focus On Customer Experience

Ashutosh Sharma

Companies are turning to digital to do one of the three things: improve customer experience (CX) using digital technologies; improve their operational efficiency to better serve customers; and launch new business models.

The manufacturing and industrial sectors are undergoing a similar transformation. In my recent discussions with leaders in this market, Industry 4.0 and smart factory dominate the conversations, but the discussions quickly shift to the Internet of things (IoT). While the industrial internet is the most significant manifestation of the digital revolution in these sectors, we are also coming across a broader range of digital initiatives from manufacturing firms.

Tech vendors and systems integrators working with manufacturing firms have identified two types of engagements emerging. Infosys’ Global Head of the Manufacturing Vertical, Nitesh Bansal opined that one set of firms are taking charge of sensors and monitors that they own and leveraging the data assets to improve predictive maintenance, asset efficiency and improve track and trace. Outcomes from these digital operational excellence (DOX) initiatives include:

  • Collecting data and analyzing it for better predictive maintenance
  • Empowering technicians to do their job better by providing actionable directions at the point of maintenance
  • Using augmented reality to help with quick diagnosis and fix
  • Increasing the asset throughput while increasing safety using automated self-driven vehicles
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Exploring The IoT Attack Surface

Jeff Pollard

Merritt Maxim and I just published our research on the IoT Attack Surface. This report gives a realistic, but not sensationalized, view of how enterprises need to think about IoT. Three factors motivated our research for this topic - attacks on IoT will transcend the digital-physical divide, the sheer scale of IoT will challenge security teams, and IoT devices collect massive amounts of data.

The following methodology allowed us to hone in on concrete enterprise scenarios:

  • We went for offense first. We started by interviewing prominent security researchers that spend their days thinking about how to attack IoT devices and systems. Our outside in approach allowed us to develop a threat model for intrusions, as well as identify weak points in the defenses of IoT makers, users, and operators.
  • We explored the ramifications of an attack. We wanted to understand what an attacker would - or could - do when successful. We also wanted to understand the amount of friction that existed for whatever came next - credential harvesting, persistence, or disrupting operations.
  • We examined existing security practices to understand what works, and what doesn't when defending IoT devices. This step highlighted that while IoT is different, defending IoT looks similar to other security problems S&R pros have dealt with. You can bring security lessons forward and apply them to IoT without having to learn them all over again.
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Three Ways B2B Marketers Can Put Interactive Content To Work

Daniel Klein

Interactive content (i.e., online assessments, calculators, and quizzes) helps B2B marketers shift from explaining to conversing. As my colleague Laura Ramos explains, “Interactive tools...help to create an ‘across the table’ approach at scale.”

Despite this obvious connection, only 44% of attendees at a recent webinar I hosted said they currently use interactive content on their website. So what should B2B marketers do to help close this gap between content delivery and buyer engagement? Interviews with over a dozen senior B2B marketing leaders reveal three primary ways they are putting interactive content to work creating business results: 

  1. Generating leads. Interactive content is great for generating leads because it attracts prospects’ interest by offering an engaging and tailored experience that doesn’t exist when someone passively reads or watches your content. In fact, our January 2016 content objectivity and credibility survey of 200-plus IT and LOB professionals showed that two out of the top six content sources they prefer to read/use are interactive content tools.                            
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Amazon's Customer Relationship is King: Will Yours Be a Prince or a Jester?

James McQuivey

In 2010, I wrote:

"There's a critical lesson to learn from the most recent changes in the media industry. ... while most have been distracted by the form, price, and user experience of their new digital products, a few companies have quietly overhauled the media business by focusing on something else entirely; instead of digitizing the product, these companies have digitized the customer relationship, creating a relationship that can survive the transition from traditional analog media to digital."

I was talking about Netflix, which in 2010 doubled its stock price from under $10 a share to over $20. It now hovers around $100. Back in 2010, I made it clear that this transition to relationships wasn't just about media companies, which were simply canaries in a digital coal mine:

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The Forrester Wave: Marketing Measurement and Optimization Solutions, 2016

Jim Nail

Gone are the days of marketing mix providers.  So long cross-channel attribution technologies.  There’s a new sheriff in town—Marketing Measurement And Optimization Solutions.

Today, Tina Moffett and I are excited to publish The Forrester Wave: Marketing Measurement and Optimization Solutions, 2016.  The 2016 Marketing Measurement and Optimization Wave combines the previous Marketing Mix Modeling Wave and Cross-Channel Attribution Wave.  This report evaluates 10 vendors on current offering criteria, strategy, and market presence. 

Why did we take this “unified” approach to marketing measurement?  Customer data deluge is putting pressure on marketers to measure the effectiveness of ALL marketing initiatives, across each customer.Marketing mix modeling and cross-channel attribution each provide deep marketing performance insights but each fell short in providing what marketers urgently need: a singular view of marketing performance.

Over the past 18 months, Forrester saw a dramatic shift in solutions; traditional marketing mix modeling measurement providers were investing in technology and methodology develop for attribution and we dubbed this “Unified Marketing Impact Analytics”

This inaugural wave helps marketers make sense of this complex landscape of top providers in the measurement space. By virtue of offering a unified approach today, these 10 vendors are the creme de la creme. We expect to see this landscape evolve, with new players entering into the space and mainstays evolve their core offering even further.

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The Forrester Wave: Marketing Measurement and Optimization Solutions, 2016

Tina Moffett

Gone are the days of marketing mix providers.  So long cross-channel attribution technologies.  There’s a new sheriff in town—Marketing Measurement And Optimization Solutions.

Today, Jim Nail and I are excited to publish The Forrester Wave: Marketing Measurement and Optimization Solutions, 2016.  The 2016 Marketing Measurement and Optimization Wave combines the previous Marketing Mix Modeling Wave and Cross-Channel Attribution Wave.  This report evaluates 10 vendors on current offering criteria, strategy, and market presence. 

Why did we take this “unified” approach to marketing measurement?  Customer data deluge is putting pressure on marketers to measure the effectiveness of ALL marketing initiatives, across each customer.  Marketing mix modeling and cross-channel attribution each provide deep marketing performance insights but each fell short in providing what marketers urgently need: a singular view of marketing performance.

Over the past 18 months, Forrester saw a dramatic shift in solutions; traditional marketing mix modeling measurement providers were investing in technology and methodology develop for attribution and we dubbed this “Unified Marketing Impact Analytics”. 

Read more