Federal CX Professionals: Your Time Is Now

Rick Parrish

This post is part of a series dedicated to the challenges, opportunities, and realities of federal customer experience. Interested in learning more? Check out our recent webinar to learn why CX success is vital for government success.

In my last post, I explained how forces arrayed against federal customer experience (CX) improvement hinder Washington’s efforts. Luckily, there’s a way out of this quagmire. To overcome anti-CX forces and achieve all the advantages of better federal CX, customer experience professionals should:

  • Form an unstoppable coalition. Don’t try to fight alone. Instead, join forces with like-minded feds to share information, challenges, and solutions. Start by leveraging the large network of the General Services Administration’s CX Community of Practice, which has over 500 members from more than 70 federal, state, and local government organizations. Then tap into the bureaucratic muscle of the senior program managers, OMB staff, and other officials on OMB’s new Core Federal Services Council, the “government-wide governance vehicle to improve the public’s experience with federal services.”
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Verizon’s Acquisition Of Fleetmatics Group Boosts IoT Momentum In The Telco Space

Dan Bieler

Verizon’s acquisition of Fleetmatics Group isn’t the first deal that involves a telco pushing into new internet-of-things (IoT) territory in the vehicle management space. In 2015, Orange acquired fleet management provider Ocean to strengthen its vehicle fleet management activities.

However, at $2.4 billion, the Fleetmatics deal is much bigger than most telcos have been willing to contemplate to date, underlining Verizon's commitment to the IoT space. But this deal won’t transform Verizon’s enterprise revenue composition overnight. While it will help improve Verizon's position in terms of IoT revenues, Fleetmatics had revenues of $285 million in 2015 – compared to Verizon’s $132 billion.

The price it is prepared to pay for Fleetmatics shows that Verizon expects to see impressive long-term benefits from the deal. Forrester expects that Verizon will ultimately extend Fleetmatics’ business model beyond global fleet and mobile workforce management solutions to more general tracking and tracing solutions for nonpowered objects like skips, agricultural equipment, machinery, and other connected assets.

Verizon has its work cut out: The acquisition is the easy part. But successful integration will be much harder, as this deal is about supporting customers with their business processes rather than just selling them new products.

Insights-Driven Businesses Will Make $1.2 Trillion In 2020. Wanna Join Them?

Ted Schadler
You can't win, serve, and retain powerful customers without being insights-driven. It's one of the principles of customer obsession: customer-led, insights-driven, fast, and connected. So what does it mean to be insights-driven? We think we know based on conversations with over 50 companies over three years. 
 
We have identified 40 public companies and a horde of venture-backed startups that work in a fundamentally different way: They harness and apply data at every opportunity to differentiate their products and customer experiences. That makes them faster and fleeter than you. In fact, using data from PitchBook and Morningstar, we forecast that, collectively, these insights-driven businesses will make $1.2 trillion dollars in 2020 (see the first figure).
 
What does it mean to be insights-driven? It's easiest to see by example. What if you could:
  • Optimize the driving experience by mining car performance data for insights to continuously improve car software? Tesla does.
  • Improve student loan re-financing prices and risk by finding insights in a borrower's credit card transaction history, college, and grades? Earnest does.
  • Win a football championship by gathering data and using insights to improve recruiting, training, and half-time pep talks. FC Midtjylland does.
  • Earn the best on-time arrival of any major airline by measuring when the airplane door closes -- and everything leading up to it. Alaska Airlines does.
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Introducing Forrester's B2B Tech Customer Experience Index Methodology

TJ Keitt

Since 2007, Forrester has helped consumer brands evaluate the experience they deliver to their customers with our Customer Experience Index (CX Index™). This methodology powerfully demonstrates to business-to-consumer (B2C) companies the link between CX and customer loyalty. Business-to-business (B2B) firms can benefit from a similar methodology to assess their emerging CX practices. Using the B2C-oriented CX Index as a foundation, we created the Forrester B2B Tech Customer Experience Index, which we are unveiling today.

The B2B Tech CX Index is designed to account for the key differences between B2B and B2C technology companies in managing a customer experience:

  • The number of stakeholders within a single account. In a single B2B account there are numerous "customers" -- individuals who interact directly with the vendor or its products. This can include business analysts, procurement officers, tech management executives, systems administrators, end users, and help desk staff. Because B2B tech companies have to account for many different stakeholders, the B2B Tech CX Index captures this range of customers by surveying both business leaders and technologists.
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"Social Marketing" Strategies Are Holding You Back

Melissa Parrish

Social marketing is at a crossroads.

The explosive popularity of social media over the last decade led many B2C marketers to launch social programs, often without any strategy or even an understanding of what they hoped to accomplish. Since then, nearly all marketers have jumped on the social media bandwagon launching Instagram accounts and influencer programs, putting UGC on their websites, buying listening platforms and ads, and, yes, maintaining a Facebook page -- but many are struggling to articulate the value of all this “social.” What’s going wrong and where do marketers go from here?

In order for marketers to take back the reins on their social practices, they must realize two fundamental things:

First, that “social media” is not one single channel. It is a collection of technologies -- from social networks to blogs; ratings and reviews to full-blown communities; and everything in between -- that allow people to connect with each other, whether that’s friends connecting with friends, consumers connecting with brands, or employees connecting with each other.

And second, since it’s not a single channel that you can turn on and off with the flick of a switch, it’s not something for which you need a single dedicated strategy. Instead, you need a marketing strategy in which social tactics and technologies are employed and deployed where they’ll help you make the most progress toward your goals.

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You’re Not An Insights-Driven Business - And It Really Hurts

James McCormick

In Forrester's new report, The Insights-Driven Business, my colleagues Ted Schadler, Brian Hopkins, and I have identified a predator: the insights-driven business. These businesses are vigorously applying insights to decisions and customer engagements at every opportunity. Their leaders have a fundamental and emotional understanding of the value of insights in driving their business today — and for developing its future. They have corporate strategies and cultures that mean that leveraging data, analytics, and insights is easy and deeply embedded in everything they do. For these firms, prioritizing and coordinating investments in data and technology is not a tortuous process of guesstimating ROIs and long procurement cycles.

So who are these predators? Well, there are obvious players like Facebook, Amazon, Google, Uber, and Netflix. But, less obviously, there are many long-standing mature enterprises across many different verticals: Alaska Airlines,The Washington Post, some European football clubs, some retailers, and others that we call out in our new report are successfully transforming into insights-driven businesses today.

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Insights-Driven Businesses Are Stealing Your Customers

Brian  Hopkins

Is your business digital? Like Domino’s Pizza, do you realize that you are not a product or service business, rather you are a software and data business that provides products or services? Do you exploit all of your customers' data to know them inside-out? Are customers flocking to you because you are driving every engagement with insight about them? If the answer to any of these questions is not a resounding, “Yes!”, then you are losing revenue and shareholder value.

In Forrester’s new report, The Insight Driven Business, my colleagues Ted Schadler, James McCormick and I identify a type of business that ignores the "data driven" hype. Instead, insights-driven businesses focus on implementing insights - that is actionable knowledge in the context of a process or decision - in the software that drives every aspect of their business. This is a big shift from most firms that fret over big data and technology. Instead insights-driven businesses focus on turning insights into action. The big data and technology pieces come along naturally as a consequence.

To gauge the economic impact of insights-driven businesses, Forrester built a revenue model that conservatively forecasts insights-driven businesses will earn about $400 billion in 2016; however, by 2020 they will be making over $1.2 trillion a year due to an astonishing compound annual growth rate between 27% and 40%. Given that global growth is less than 4%, how will they pull this off? Plain and simple, they’ll do this by understanding customers more deeply and using that insight to steal them from their competition. 

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The Data Digest: What Pokémon Go Reveals About Evolving Consumers

Anjali Lai

Within 24 hours of its launch, Pokémon Go broke app download records and user numbers began multiplying by the minute. It wasn’t long before mysterious names like “Jigglypuff” and “Squirtle” peppered daily conversation, stampedes of mobile-obsessed gamers became commonplace, and augmented reality approached a tipping point.

The future arrives faster than we think.

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Microsoft Stream Hopes To Shake Up EVP Market

Nick Barber

Microsoft Stream, the company’s enterprise video platform (EVP) bolted onto Office 365 could shake up the EVP market, but don’t jump in head first just yet.

 
 

Video used to be the domain of media and broadcasters, but now enterprises from healthcare to financial services have reason to be doing video. They can use video to connect internal employees and external prospects with the CEO during a live event. Or maybe HR needs to establish a centralized training channel.  

 

It makes sense for Microsoft to move into this market more robustly. It already has tens of millions of users on its Office 365 email and productivity suite so video is a logical step.

 

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Mobile Search: It's Different

Jennifer Wise

This post is co-authored by Julie A. Ask, VP and principal analyst at Forrester

Mobile search is essential. In fact, according to Forrester’s Mobile Audience Data, Q4 2015, 87% of US smartphone owners rely on browser-based search on mobile devices. And the data reveals that Google’s search engine is the most common path to a mobile site even for well-known brands such as Amazon, Walmart and Kmart.

As a top discovery resource, companies can’t afford to wait any longer to implement a mobile-first search strategies. The biggest seen mistake today? Either lacking a strategy completely, or treating mobile search the same way as desktop search. As Forrester Research’s Dr. James McQuivey says, “When businesses first adopt a technology, they do old things in new ways. When they internalize a technology, they begin to do new things.” Consumers use mobile phones very differently than they use desktop computers. So must Marketers.

Forrester conducted an in-depth analysis of how consumers use Google search on mobile versus desktop devices to parse-out how consumers use the two devices differently. Today, Forrester finds that consumers purchase a range of categories on their smartphones: insurance, travel, financial services products, and even pet food. For this research we focused on the travel category because consumers are so likely to research and book travel on mobile devices – Forrester’s Mobile Audience Online Survey, Q4 2015 reveals that 29% of mobile users have purchased hotel rooms and 22% an airline ticket on their smartphone.

To build on our Forrester insights, we looked at Google’s data and discovered that when it comes to mobile searching:

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