Futurology Episode 4: The Future of The Connected Workplace

Michael Facemire

This post was authored by Claudia Tajima, Researcher at Forrester.

 

On the second part of the forth episode of our Futurology webinar series, Mike Facemire, Julie Ask and James McQuivey convened to discuss the future of the connected workplace. Looking forward, they discussed what change in the workplace will look like and what it will take to get there.

See WEBINAR: Forrester Futurology Episode IV: The Future Of Me (Part 2).

 

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The Data Digest: Super Bowl Ads With Political Messages Spark Strong Emotional Reactions

Kristopher Arcand

The dust is settling after last week’s exciting Super Bowl. Emotions certainly ran high for those watching the game. Here at Forrester, we were also interested in the longer-term sentiment about the ads that aired during the show. So we reached out to consumers again after a week to capture consumers’ reactions to the Super Bowl ads, to ask them which they liked most, and to ask which made a lasting impression.

As my colleague Jim Nail pointed out in a blog post , this year’s ads did not always resonate positively (if at all) with audiences. That said, our ConsumerVoices market research online community members were most likely to mention 84 Lumber, Audi, and Anheuser-Busch/Budweiser as memorable ads that influenced their opinions of the respective companies.

In the case of 84 Lumber’s and Anheuser-Busch’s focus on immigration, sentiment was sharply split. Quite a few consumers were further turned off when 84 Lumber’s CEO declared that the ad was not intended to be pro-immigration, adding more confusion to consumers’ perception of the brand and its values. On the other hand, Audi’s ad addressing gender equality in pay sparked a different controversy. Although Audi is an aspirational luxury brand, the message was seen as bold and received in good faith, producing a more positive sentiment overall.

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I Want To Know What Love Is

Margaret Rodriguez

Happy Valentine’s Day! You know the feeling of being in love: You want to stay with your significant other forever, love them more each day, and tell everyone how great they are. Your customers know it, too! Many companies have begun tracking how their customers feel as part of their CX measurement program. In the CX Index™, we too track how customers felt during their most recent interaction with a brand. 

What’s Love Got To Do With It?

We find that customers who give high scores on Emotion are more likely stay with the brand, spend more on products or services, and tell others how much they love the brand. And just like in relationships, there’s a big difference once your customers fall in “love” – customers in the CX Index who rate the brand a perfect seven out of seven on Emotion, or “love” the brand, say they are 18% to 40% more likely to enrich their relationship with the brand. For brands in all industries, this means that there is business benefit to helping your customers fall in love with you (whether via greater revenue, lower churn, or both).

Let’s Talk About Love

Brands benefit from higher customer advocacy loyalty when customers love them -- but how can brands benefit if they don’t know what love is? Forrester analyzed the specific emotions felt by customers during their most recent interactions with brands in the CX Index.

●     Baby, don’t hurt me. Brands whose customers score them high on Emotion almost never make customers feel negative emotions like frustrated, angry, or anxious.

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This Valentine’s Day, Pause and Appreciate Flower Logistics...

Phoenix Zhang

Over the past few days, Boston has been slammed by multiple snow storms.  This causes challenges for my pending flight to San Jose, but another deadline looms:  some roses might not be able to make it to Boston on time for Valentine's Day. Only someone deeply concerned with Supply Chain and Logistics worries about delivery time on Valentine’s Day. But perhaps we all should:  it could very easily shape whether you get a kiss or the cold shoulder for Valentine’s Day tomorrow.

According to IPSOS floral tracking study, cut, fresh flowers take center stage for three holidays:  Christmas, Mother's Day and Valentine's Day[i].  The US imported 976 million cut flower stems in advance of Valentine’s Day last year, between January 1 and February 14.[ii] You might guess these flowers are from the Netherlands. However, the Netherlands supplied only 2% of all imported volume. Seventy-one percent of Valentine's Day flowers came from Colombia alone and 19% from Ecuador. 

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Will The RSA Conference 2017 Make You A Better Security Pro?

Chris McClean

Today kicks off what’s always an exciting week for the infosec industry; in between meeting old and new friend at the RSA Conference, we’ll hopefully hear about practical new ideas, technologies, and opportunities for better managing information risk. Coincidentally, I’m proud to announce a new report highlighting the best tactics CISOs and security leaders are using to elevate their game:  How To Become A Superstar Security Leader. Will we hear any practical advice like this at the conference?

So far, so good. This morning in Moscone West, I already heard some great stories of cooperation at the Practical Intelligence Sharing: ISACs and ISAOs sessions, with a kick off from our own Laura Koetzle. In the (14!) years I’ve been to RSA previously, I’ve seen far too many technology vendors touting new partnerships and technical cure-alls and far too few case study examples like this of innovation helping CISOs do their jobs better. I’m cautiously optimistic things will be better this year.

So for the rest of the week, I’ll be looking past announcements of new products, acquisitions, and alliances; keeping an eye out instead for real-world examples and results. If you’re interested to hear Forrester’s take on the most interesting things we hear at the conference, register for our webinar here: Top Security Trends From The RSA Conference 2017.

And throughout the week, if you see or hear anything you think we should look into, please let us know!

Forrester's Digital Transformation Forum 2017: The Future Won’t Wait, So Neither Should You

Martin Gill

We’ve spent the last few weeks hothousing ideas for the forthcoming Digital Transformation forum in Chicago on May 9th and 10th. We’ve been identifying the key themes that will ripple through our Digital Transformation events in 2017. Themes that resonate with where the market is at right now, and ones that point to the rapidly emerging future.

 

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There’s More To Service Design Than You Think You Know

Ryan Hart

TSA, America’s infamous airport security organization, made headlines last year when it placed the blame on passengers for long lines at airport security, claiming that individuals were at fault for showing up to checkpoints unprepared.

Any time an organization puts the onus back onto the user for not being able to properly navigate a service should raise a huge red flag.

Now if the TSA scenario doesn’t scream service design misalignment to an informed CX pro, then it’s important to clarify what we mean when we talk in terms in “service design.” By Forrester’s definition:

“Service design is a creative, collaborative process that draws from the tools of human-centered design to holistically improve and innovate new value for users as they move through sequential service interactions.”

As CX pros continue to build out their CX design tool kits, they will have an advantage if they can discern that service design allows them to:

  • Scale a human-centered mindset through processes and tools. Design-led organizations such as Apple, Tesla, Airbnb, and Slack won’t go to market with a new service until they carefully analyze and understand the impact it will have on customers as they move along the service journey.
  • Take the pulse of the broader CX ecosystem. The holistic, end-to-end nature of service design gives CX pros multiple opportunities to appraise the health of a broader user journey. Logically, process reengineering around the needs of the customer thus forms a critical component of service design. 
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How To Launch Customer Obsession

Shar VanBoskirk

Since 2010, you've heard Forrester beating our customer obsessed drum.  It is our idea that in The Age of the Customer, your relationship with your customers are your primary competitive differentiator.  We've written a lot about how to put the customer at the center of your total operating model.  But a total customer-obsessed transformation can be daunting because of the completeness it requires.  So many companies we talk to get overwhelmed at the idea of having to change every single part of their business, so they do nothing instead.  How could we offer a wedge into the customer obsessed transformation?  Could companies start toward customer obsession more easily if they understood where they are starting from?

We believed yes.  So we created The Customer Obsession Assessment, a large quantitiative survey, which included myriad statements related to customer service, customer experience, customer relationships, supporting technologies and sent it out to just over 1000 global executives.  Then we applied factor analysis and regression analysis to determine which statements most closely correlated with customer obsession.  From this effort we created: 1) An assessment that companies could take to determine their customer obsession maturity; 2) A segmentation of the execs who took our study so that we could identify best practices and pitfalls common at each stage in maturity. 

A few findings from the research:

*Most companies are still immature.  Overall, our sample distributed into a bell curve, with 62% landing in the bottom least mature segments. 

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Looking Forward To The B2B Marketing Forum In October 2017

Peter O'Neill

As I did in 2016, I thought that I would provide you with a timely reminder that we have reconfigured our events calendar this year, and the B2B Marketing 2017 forum is now scheduled for October 5th and 6th in Austin, Texas. If you have not done so, it is still not too late to catch up on our recent forum — here is a blog debrief and this is a podcast where I was interviewed after the event.

Planning is well underway. B2B Marketing 2017 will deepen and expand the discussion of post-digital marketing that we began in Miami in October 2016. Post-digital marketing describes practices that replace segmentation and aggregation strategies with marketing techniques that addresses customers at an individual level and engages them at specific moments of need or opportunity. Post-digital marketing is personalized and opportunistic, and our Austin program will examine in detail the application of post-digital marketing to specific marketing tasks and challenges as well as the technologies and platforms to deliver on that vision. So please mark your calendars if you have not already done so.

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VR Will Transform Marketing Experiences But Not Before 2020

Thomas Husson

Virtual Reality generates lots of buzz and massive investments. Isn’t it the next computing platform according to Facebook’s CEO Mark Zuckerberg? Hasn’t Magic Leap - the most secretive start-up- raised up to $1.4 billion to deliver on that promise?

Together with my colleague Samantha Merlivat, we decided to evaluate the opportunities VR will open up for marketers. In the next decade, we believe that unlike any channel to date, VR will offer highly immersive and intimate experiences with a future integrated with social and IoT. This unique combination will create not just new storytelling capabilities, but also opportunities to craft whole new experiences as part of the brand offering. Companies like Facebook are betting on VR to fulfill the dream of what Second Life tried to achieve in 2007: enabling social interactions and gatherings within virtual spaces. Moving forward, VR will be enhanced by sensory devices that increase the immersive and realistic nature of virtual experiences and transition the users from passive participant to live actor. Think of it as “human teleportation”.

We’re not there yet. Let’s look at the facts. Magic Leap has not launched anything yet and TechCrunch is right to question its PR approach. Device penetration is still niche and will remain so for a couple more years. Content costs are high and production is complicated. Forrester estimates that critical-mass consumer adoption of high-end VR headsets is at least five years away. In the meantime, 360 video content will flourish on low-to-mid-end VR devices, but 360 video is not a truly immersive VR experience. Benefits for brands and consumers alike are limited.

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