Forrester’s Marketing & Strategy Summit Is Coming To Sydney August 13th!

Michael Barnes

I’m thrilled to announce that in less than six weeks’ time Forrester Research will hold its first-ever Summit for Marketing & Strategy Professionals in Sydney, Australia.

The entire Australia team is incredibly excited about this landmark event for Forrester. Here’s why:

The theme for this year’s event is “Winning In The Age Of The Customer.” What does this really mean? It’s simple, really. Empowered by digital platforms, your customers are free — free to act on their own needs and priorities, free to pick their own moments of engagement, free to design their own experiences — and free to ignore your own best efforts to shape and control all three. Forrester calls this new reality “the age of the customer.”

We’ll be releasing some brand-new research at the event that sheds light on the current state of customer experience management practices in Australia. While I don’t want to give away the ending, suffice it to say that Australian firms of all sizes are making customer experience a strategic priority. Firms across Australia increasingly have C-level executives driving their focus on CX, and they expect to get significant value from their efforts.

But not all firms are at the same level of maturity — or even awareness. While some are finding ways to pull ahead of competitors through CX differentiation, others have not even gotten started yet. That’s why we’ve tailored this event to show attendees the one sure path to CX maturity and provide detailed guidance on how to advance along that path.

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How Hampton Hotels Built And Sustains Its Customer-Obsessed Culture

Sam Stern

My latest report, "How Hampton Hotels Built And Sustains Its Customer-Obsessed Culture," is a case study of the hotel chain. The brand has been on a nearly 10-year journey to differentiate its hotels from competitors on the basis of exceptional guest experiences. It all started back in 2004. As part of the brand's 20th-anniversary celebration, Hampton asked its hotel owners to make about 120 product upgrades ranging from curved shower curtain rods to easy-to-use alarm clocks. Within a year, competitors had copied all of the new features.

The next year, in response to the cutthroat competition in the hotel industry, Hampton embarked on a culture transformation intended to differentiate its hotels from competitors by delivering superior guest experiences. Along the way, the team at Hampton learned important lessons about how to create and sustain a customer-obsessed culture:

  • Leverage executive support. The Hampton brand team began by making sure it had executive support for a culture transformation. That was smart. In previous research, I found that every successful culture transformation has had active executive support. The team at Hampton took advantage of having a strong advocate for customer focus in the form of Phil Cordell, who was the global head of focused service and Hampton brand management. He backed the transformation and created a new position, senior director of brand program development and integration, and appointed Gina Valenti to lead the transformation efforts.
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The Innovative Tool That’s Transforming Customer Experience Training

Sam Stern

Companies want customer-obsessed cultures that will help them differentiate in the age of the customer. But transforming a culture can be a challenge: It requires all employees to understand who their customers are, how customers perceive their interactions with the company, and what roles employees need to play in delivering the overall experience. Enter learning maps, which are fast becoming the centerpiece of small-group interactive training sessions at many companies.

In my recent report, "Executive Q&A: Learning Maps; Innovative Tools For Customer Experience Training," I answered some of the common questions related to creating a learning maps to help companies decide if they should develop their own learning maps.

What are learning maps?

Learning maps are large-scale visualizations that use data, graphics, and illustrations to tell a story. The maps are training tools that abstract significant amounts of information into a format that facilitates conversations and understanding for diverse groups of employees.

How are learning maps used to improve customer experience?

Learning maps are typically used in small-group interactive training sessions to help employees understand the company's customer experience strategy and their role in delivering against that strategy.

What are the common scenarios where learning maps add value?

Some of the specific use cases for deploying learning maps include:

  • Sharing a new customer experience strategy.
  • Changing a specific part of the customer experience.
  • Training managers.
  • Integrating employees from acquired companies.
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Join The 2014 Financial Services Architecture Survey

Jost Hoppermann

Banks and other types of firms in financial services typically like to know the answer to the question: “What are the others doing?” They leverage the answer when, for example, assessing their overall strategic position, planning for the transformation of their application landscape to a more powerful customer-centric approach, or determining the “best” sourcing approach for this transformation. 

  

It is time to update the survey results: Forrester has just started surveying banks in North America, Europe, and further geographies about their major business drivers, the current state of their application landscape, their key issues and concerns, and their plans for the future. At a high level, the survey is designed to answer the question: “What are others doing?” Phrased in a different way, it targets the question: “What are the key trends regarding the transformation of the application landscape in financial services in the Age of the Customer?”

Source: November 8, 2012, “The Transformation Imperative In Financial Services Defies Any Crisis” Forrester Report

To make this survey successful, Forrester needs your help. If you are working in financial services in any role that is related to financial services business applications, architecture and strategy, please participate in Forrester’s Global Financial Services Architecture Survey 2014. If you have not yet received an email invitation, please contact me – JHoppermann (at) Forrester.com and I ensure that you will receive a link to the online survey.

Thanks a lot for your help,

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A Few Startup Trends Worth Watching

Michael Yamnitsky

With the press overhyping 3D printing, virtual reality, and Bitcoin, it’s hard for CIOs to track the startup trends impacting business today. Below are two trends we see startups and their investors focused on, and a future trend we expect to gain interest in the next 12 to 24 months that CIOs should care about.

Self-service business models disrupting industries. Startups are coming up with creative ways to reengineer cumbersome analog business processes with technology. Uber uses cloud, mobile, and analytics to recreate and bypass parts of the taxi/private car value chain. It connects customers directly to drivers, and uses data and analytics to make more efficient use of vehicle capacity. Other examples of startups developing new approaches to old industry processes include Oscar in health insurance and Simple in retail banking. What’s next? As 3D printers and connected products become more mainstream, and digital is further embedded in the physical world, we’ll see entrepreneurs apply self-service to new markets. Sols hopes to shake up orthotics by allowing customers to customize and print custom-insoles on 3D printers.

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Mobile Application Security - The Fight Results

Tyler Shields

A few months ago I posted a blog entry entitled: "Containerization vs. Application Wrapping: The Tale Of The Tape." Well... the bout is finally over and a winner has been decided. Using a virtual tape measure, I analyzed the mobile application technology spectrum to determine which technologies are better suited to deployment in the enterprise and why. The results were about what I expected. The fight went right down to the wire and nobody scored a knockout with the winner being decided with a slim margin over the 8 rounds. Here is the judge's score card:

You can read all about the data behind the analysis and the justification for the results in my latest report: "In The Mobile Security Bout Of the Year, App Wrapping Beats Containerization On Points." 

When Mobile Becomes The New Face Of Social

Thomas Husson

Messaging apps have the potential either to become digital platforms or to significantly enhance the power of current platforms because they so clearly deliver the three things that determine digital platform power: frequent interactions, emotional connection, and convenience. WeChat is for example already morphing into a digital platform offering, thanks to the deep pockets of its parent company, the Chinese Internet giant Tencent.

While today’s opportunities are limited by consumers’ reluctance to engage with brands on such intimate channels and by immature marketing tools, it is definitely time for marketers to experiment and to anticipate the next steps.

Indeed, you’ve surely heard of the second-largest acquisition in tech history, Facebook’s purchase of WhatsApp for $19 billion. However, you may not have heard of KakaoTalk, Kik, Line, Secret, Snapchat, Tango, Viber, or Whisper.

These messaging apps are the new face of social in a mobile context.

Contrary to social media that are generally public broadcast mechanisms that facilitate one-to-many communications, a messaging app is a typically private, one-to-one or one-to-few communication and media tool optimized for mobile. Such smartphone apps can access your address book, bypassing the need to rebuild your social graph on a new service. As Evan Spiegel, the CEO of Snapchat, puts it, “We no longer capture the real world and recreate it online – we simply live and communicate at the same time.”

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Agile BI Ship Has Sailed — Get On Board Quickly Or Risk Falling Behind

Boris Evelson

The battle over customer versus internal business processes requirements and priorities has been fought — and the internal processes lost. Game over. Customers are now empowered with mobile devices and ubiquitous cloud-based all-but-unlimited access to information about products, services, and prices. Customer stickiness is extremely difficult to achieve as customers demand instant gratification of their ever changing needs, tastes, and requirements, while switching vendors is just a matter of clicking a few keys on a mobile phone. Forrester calls this phenomenon the age of the customer. The age of the customer elevates business and technology priorities to achieve:

  • Business agility. Forrester consistently finds one common thread running through the profile of successful organizations — the ability to manage change. In the age of the customer, business agility often equals the ability to adopt, react, and succeed in the midst of an unending fountain of customer driven requirements. Forrester sees agile organizations making decisions differently by embracing a new, more grass-roots-based management approach. Employees down in the trenches, in individual business units, are the ones who are in close touch with customer problems, market shifts, and process inefficiencies. These workers are often in the best position to understand challenges and opportunities and to make decisions to improve the business. It is only when responses to change come from within, from these highly aware and empowered employees, that enterprises become agile, competitive, and successful.
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Deutsche Telekom And Salesforce.com: The Advent Of A SaaS Colocation?

Stefan Ried

There are a couple of announcements today at salesforce.com’s local marketing event in Munich. Definitely the most important one — and the one that customers have been eagerly awaiting — is the joint announcement from Salesforce and T-Systems, the systems integration branch of Deutsche Telekom (DT). Earlier, Salesforce announced that it’s planning to build a data center in Germany, which is definitely the best way to comply with German data privacy laws and the emotional concerns of German customers around privacy. But as a US-headquartered company, just operating a data center is not enough; companies need to create trust and have experience in fulfilling legal and regulatory compliance mandates. This makes T-Systems exactly the right partner for Salesforce: It’s big enough to compete with data center heavyweights like Fujitsu, HP, and IBM but local enough to understand German customers and law.

The picture shows DT CEO Timotheus Höttges and Salesforce’s Marc Benioff just a few minutes ago.

Let’s look into more details of T-Systems’ offering how it relates to salesforce.com. First of all, it will simply feel like any other Salesforce data center. Customers will see absolutely no difference, regardless of whether their “tenant” is running on the East Coast, West Coast, or the US-based data center dedicated to European customers. In the future, they can choose the Salesforce UK data center and, starting in 2015, a Salesforce Germany data center. All are fully managed by Salesforce, operate on the same code base, and will get new releases and upgrades at the “same” time.

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Tencent’s News Portal Is Differentiating Itself By Using IBM Social Analytics During The World Cup

Gene Cao

Contributed by James McCormick and Allison Smith

Tencent’s news portal is one of the largest online news portals in China, with more than 25 channels covering all types of news. Tencent faces fierce competition, which it intends to combat by building its analytics competency. With the eyes of millions of Chinese soccer fans on the World Cup, Tencent has a chance to better target its news and reports by using social analytics — which the news portal did by launching a mini-site of World Cup 2014 coverage. More than 50 advertisers showed interest in the World Cup site, thinking that it would differentiate Tencent’s news offerings and draw more traffic. And they were right: The site got more than 3 million hits in the first week of the Cup.

Tencent now has the first social analytics website for sports in China. Supported by IBM’s Social Analytics engine and hosted in its SoftLayer data center in Hong Kong, the site aggregates data from most leading Chinese social platforms including Qzone, Renren, Sina Weibo, and Tencent Weibo. Full coverage of these social platforms can help Chinese businesses get a fuller picture of customers to better personalize and target offers. Tencent’s news editors also have a separate social analytics tool to find buzzwords or popular terms on social platforms and highlight these attention-getting phrases in their titles and articles.

This investment is delivering two major benefits to Tencent:

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