Enterprise Mashups Need Complexity To Create Value

Gilyehuda By Gil Yehuda
Those who drink the Web 2.0 Kool-aid live in a idealistic world where we can mentally connect a great idea to a great implementation of that idea. We live on faith that the great implementation will come, since there are plenty of smart people out there who will eventually figure out how to make value out of technology building blocks. Sometimes our faith is tested when the killer-app does not show up for a long time. But evidence can restore our faith.

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Customer Reference Programs: Going Social?

Laura Ramos

Lauraramos [Posted by Laura Ramos]

Great customer references fuel great B2B marketing. But getting customers to testify or submit case studies is challenging. Good references require investment. But how do you keep customers from feeling like shills for their vendor firms? By involving them in communities of like-minded advocates! That is one hypothesis I plan to explore further in 2009 -- investigating the connection between social activity and greater customer advocacy.

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Yang Steps Aside as CEO: A Good Thing For Yahoo!

Shar VanBoskirk

Sharvanboskirk [Posted by Shar VanBoskirk]

**Update** Per the comments below, I've adjusted the title of this post to reflect that Jerry Yang is transitioning out of the CEO role, not "departing" Yahoo! overall.

This morning, Yahoo! announced that founder and CEO Jerry Yang would step aside as soon as Yahoo! found a replacement.

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Is The ‘Green’ In Green IT Dead? No, Because It Was Never Really Alive.

Doug Washburn

Dougwashburn In a number of recent client interactions with both enterprise IT end users and vendors, the question of “Is the ‘green’ in Green IT dead?” has come up. Primarily driven by the current economic climate, IT end users want to understand how relevant the environmental benefits of Green IT should be to their strategic planning; likewise, vendors want to know how palatable green messaging of their products and services is to their customers.

First and foremost, technology is not green and never will be. The design, manufacture, operation and disposal of IT equipment generates tremendous upfront and ongoing environmental impact (read more about this in my “Is Green IT Your Emperor With No Clothes?” research). A recent – and very primetime – example of this is the 60 Minutes "The Electronic Wasteland" segment. David Berlind from InformationWeek offers a great follow on to this in his “An E-Waste Story That'll Make You Want To Quit Tech” story.

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Addressing Virtualization's Achilles Heel

James Staten

Jamesstaten
The benefits of virtualization are quite obvious but when you start to really increase the density of virtual machines in order to maximize utilization suddenly it ain't such a simple proposition. The latest CPUs from AMD and Intel are more than up to the task of running 10-20 or more applications at a time. Most servers run out of memory and I/O bandwidth well before processing power. Recent announcements from the leading server vendors have been made to address the memory side by packing more DIMMs onto a single motherboard (including blade server boards), but you can only add so many Ethernet cards and Fibre Channel HBAs. Oh yeah, and then there's the switch ports to go with them (blade systems help a lot here).

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Sales Enablement Roundtable - West Coast Style

Scott Santucci

Door_to_door_salesman_1950NOTE:  SALES ENABLEMENT HAS A NEW BLOG 

 

On November 7th, I facilitated Forrester’s second sales enablement roundtable – this time in Foster City,California.  Joining us were sales and marketing executives from:  Intel, NetApp, Borland, Informatica, Sun, Interwoven, Microchip, Renesas, Juniper Networks, Trend Micro, and Thoughtworks. 

 

 

Overall, we had an extremely high energy session, even though I lost my voice the previous week.  It’s hard to summarize a whole day of intense discussion into a blog post, but I’ll give it a try.

 

 

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B2B Marketing Obsolete, Really? (Part III)

What does Intel's slip mean?

Intellogo In my last post, "Why this tech recession will be different,"  I observed that this slowdown will not be as severe for technology as was the 2001-2003 period.

But now comes Intel's announcement that it expects revenue for the fourth quarter to be down 10% from its original forecast. What does this mean? I have a few thoughts:

1) Intel is not the bellwether that it once was. Personal computers and servers, the primary destination for Intel's processors, are not nearly as large a percentage of tech spending as they were back in 2001.

2) Layoffs in the economy have already begun. Fewer employees, fewer PCs needed.

3) Large companies are accelerating virtualization projects. Virtualization is a fancy word for running more applications on fewer servers. It is greener (less power), simpler (fewer servers to break), and cheaper. Good for companies looking to lower capital expenditure and operating expenses in a recession, but bad for Intel.

Forrester has been predicting that the two tech segments that would be hit hardest in the recession are computing hardware (PCs and servers) and communications gear. But services and software (Intel plays in neither) would fare better. Exit polling would appear to indicate this result.

Prioritizing Your Retail IT Investments

George Lawrie

George Lawrie By George Lawrie

With retail confidence and global cargo volumes at their lowest for 5 years, retailers face increased pressure to identify quick ways to minimize costs, reduce unplanned mark downs and avoid incidence of “out-of-stock”, while trying to stretch margins, improve the merchandizing mix and increase customer satisfaction.

One retail executive told Forrester “I have any number of proposals to engage in multi year, multi million IT projects. But we don’t have the luxury to indulge in those. My boss needs results now. I need to prove that we are making progress against our financial and strategic objectives in the next quarter or two.“

To help our readers, Forrester is currently exploring simple retail IT investments that can yield immediate results. Got ideas or input? Take our confidential survey on Retail IT Investment Priorities to help develop a framework that will help identify quick wins and self funding IT initiatives that are capable of generating returns for shareholders in six month or less.

Get engaged. Get insight. Join Forrester's IT Research Panel to participate in more survey studies like this one.

Patton's Patterns - Execution Lessons for Driving Sales

Scott Santucci

Pattonmovieposterlarge General George Patton’s unparalleled ability to execute in WWII sometimes gets overshadowed by his colorful (and stupid) public relations.  Because of his quick strike abilities, the Axis leaders feared him more than any other Allied general.  What made him truly unique, and someone still studied in military academies throughout the world today, was his formula for success.  Patton had a voracious appetite for history and believed that humanity already had a master inventory of all of the strategies and tactics for winning a battle.

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