Motorola CLIQ Delights with Social Networking Capabilities

Julie Ask

by Julie Ask

I had the opportunity to demo MOTOBLUR on the Motorola CLIQ last night. The device will be available later this year with T-Mobile. It’s been a while since I’ve demo’ed a phone and immediately wanted to take one home.

First, let me say, I was really impressed with the look of the UI. The presentation of the widgets and information had a bit of a whimsical feel to them that appealed to me. I didn’ t feel as if I were clicking my way through a grid or file format. The pop-up boxes were cute. The device allows you to put your most frequently contacts on the home screen as an icon with a small photo – I was really drawn to this feature. [Forrester has written some research on dynamic address books and friendly UI's within the context of mobile social networking. ]

Spent most of my time focused on the social networking aspects. There were a number of features I really liked.

Read more

Lessons from the Windows Vista Era

JP Gownder

On October 22, Microsoft will release Windows 7, thereby effectively ending the Windows Vista era for consumers. That day can’t come too quickly: Windows Vista will go down in history as a period of trial and tribulation for Microsoft – and for many consumers who used the product, particularly during its early days.

Vista Package

There are too many product strategy insights to be learned from the Windows Vista era to fit into one blog post. Let’s look at some of the major lessons – those that can be generalized to consumer product strategies in any industry. And let’s quickly extract both the “sins” of product strategy and some general product strategy lessons provided by the Windows Vista experience:

Read more

Process Data Management: Like Your Brain And Your Heart, BPM and MDM Can’t Survive Independently

Podcast: The Millennials, The Next Power Generation In The Workforce

Claire Schooley

Our latest featured podcast is Claire Schooley's "The Millennials, The Next Power Generation In The Workforce".

 

In this podcast, BP&A Senior Analyst Claire Schooley discusses the rise of the millenial in the workforce — and strategies for most effectively using their skills.

 

 

We look forward to your questions and comments.

 

---

Subscribe to Business Process & Applications podcasts through iTunes.

Subscribe through RSS.

 

The Generations React During Our Teleconference on “Gen Y and the Future of the Workplace”

Claire Schooley

Claire-Schooley By Claire Schooley


TJ Keitt
, Heidi Lo and I presented a Forrester Teleconference about the Millennial or GenY on September 2, 2009. The multi-generational chat was by far the most active I’ve seen during a Teleconference with over 100 entries in an hour. TJ and I presented for a half hour and then opened the phone lines for voice questions. Heidi handled the tweets. Having two co-presenters helped us to participate in the chat. Because the pace of chat was so fast with so many conversations, participants were reacting to comments of others rather than just responding to a presenter comment or question. It was dynamic and truly community generated.

The premise of the teleconference was that the youngest generation in the workforce (Gen Y or Millennials) is neither revolutionizing the workforce (yet) nor acting as entitled employees. Some of the highlights of the participant interaction follow:

  • “It’s hard to get a job because as a new grad we can’t meet the ‘years of experience’ requirement.” Recommendation: Apply anyway. Be tenacious and prove that you can do the job. One Baby Boomer participant is about to start a company that mentors new employees at corporate customers to address this “experience” requirement. Another GenYer suggested using your social network to reach the hiring manager. Another said that that GenXers in an organization can be excellent mentors for the GenYers.
Read more

The Data Digest: What Drives eReader Uptake?

Reineke Reitsma

Reineke Reitsma [Posted by Reineke Reitsma]

eReaders are hot. In the past year, the market for eReaders has finally taken off. Forrester estimates that by the end of 2009, the Amazon Kindle and Sony Reader Digital Book hit the 1 million mark in combined US sales.

But what will drive mainstream adoption? Consumers want lower prices, more and cheaper content, and love to see in person how an eReader looks, feels, and reads.

Grafiek-data-digest-ereader 

Categories:

How UK Organizations Are (Still) Going Green

Doug Washburn

Doug WashburnFor the last two years Forrester has presented and most recently partnered with the Tech:Touchstone event management company that produces the Green IT 2009 Conference & Exhibition in London. Despite one year in passing and a challenging economic environment, green IT is still top of mind in 2009.

Read more

Categories:

Apple's Impact on Mobile Entertainment

Julie Ask

Apple's announcements yesterday were mostly focused on iTunes and adding a video camera to the Nano (beautiful device by the way - shape, colors, form factor, weight (lessness) - blew me away). There were a couple of interesting things that came out about the iPhone platform though.

A few of the facts:

30 million iPhones sold to date

20 million iPod Touch devices with about 225 million iPods sold to date in all with 50% to new customers (wow!)

1.8 billion downloads of more than 75,000 available applications

100 million billing relationships with credit cards ... this impresses me the most and is what I consider to be one of their important competitive advantages

Read more

Categories:

Apple's Nano video camera further erodes the camcorder market

James McQuivey

You've got to be hating life if you're a videocamera maker like Sony or Kodak and you've just been bested yet again. First, it was the immensely successful Flip video cameras that sold more than 2 million devices without a significant brand name simply because the camera was so darn easy to use. (
Personal anecdote, I recently spent a day at a major CE maker with a group of industry analysts -- they let us try their new Flip camera competitor and one of the smartest guys in the room couldn't figure out how to turn it on. Said a nearby analyst: "Hmmm, no wonder Flip beat them to this market.")

Now the game just got more complicated because Apple has decided to add video camera capability not to the iPod Touch line, but to its Nano iPods. Pause for reverential awe. This was a brilliant move. (see Wired's take on it here).

Not only because it hits Flip in a sensitive spot -- right in the high school and college market where Flip was such a hit -- but because it further disrupts the videocamera market, opening it to more innovation and rapid change. You no longer have the three tiers of videocameras (disc or tape storage, digital decent, and then your lousy phone camera), instead, you have a fourth competitor. A personal media device that is now capable of actual personal media. Oh, and did I mention it's made by Apple? Right, just checking.

Read more

Categories:

Babies, Bath Water, And Enterprise Architecture Maturity Models

Gene Leganza

Recently I took a look at an EA-maturity-model-cum-roadmap from Leo de Sousa, Manager of Business Application Services and Enterprise Architecture at the British Columbia Institute of Technology (click to read Leo’s blog on EA CMM). To my surprise, I liked it. Why was I surprised?

I have never liked EA maturity models. Yes, tracking progress is important. And yes, there should be a consensus about what characterizes a mature EA practice. But I don’t like how they would ostensibly be used to compare one enterprise with another, a la benchmarks. Perhaps I was soured on them by seeing them used as a governance technique in US federal agencies.

The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) required agencies to assess themselves against a standardized maturity model, with progressive hurdles in successive years. Federal agencies, accustomed as they are to all sorts of oversight and compliance mandates, know how to pass compliance audits. Did you ever wonder how (then) Popkin System Architect got so popular  in the federal government? An EA tool was required to demonstrate a certain level of EA maturity and System Architect was the lowest-cost offering at the time (I’m sure there are other reasons as well). Behavior was around letter-of-the-law compliance, and it seldom catalyzed getting with the spirit. Even when Dick Burk at OMB introduced a clever workaround in a second version of the model — you could leapfrog to a level 4 if you showed actual business benefits, regardless of what other checklist items you missed — agencies simply marched through the maturity level checklists getting the requisite items done. The scores were good, but in my opinion they overstated the degree to which EA was ingrained in the culture of the agencies.

Read more