Application Development Professionals Must Take The User Experience Bull By The Horns

Mike Gualtieri

Developers can write efficient and elegant code.

  • Architects can choose cost effective and flexible platforms.
  • Quality assurance and testing pros can make sure it works bug free.
  • Business analysts can uncover and document key requirements.
  • Project managers can craft a plan to get the app written on-time.
  • Managers can make sure that it is all done within the budget.
  • CIO's can find talent and put together teams.

This Prowess Is All For Naught If You Don't Get The User Experience Right!

But, this technical, process, and management prowess is all for naught if you cannot design a compelling user experience (UX) that is useful, usable, and desirable.

Ux_definition

Application Development Pros Are No Less Capable Of Learning UX Design Than Anyone Else.

Unfortunately, many application development professionals are unlearned when it comes to knowing how to design user experiences that makes users say "Wow!". It is not that they don't want to design great user experiences. They do. It is just that no one ever taught them how.

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Twitter, Tweet-Up - Where Does One Start When You Want To Get It Right?

Natalie L. Petouhoff, Ph.D. By Dr. Natalie Petouhoff

Everyone is A Beginner At the Beginning


So many of you came to the @CRMe09 conference where I spoke about the ROI of Social Media, in particular that derived from customer service. And a funny thing that happened there... Lithium had a booth in the exhibitors area and they had asked me to come and speak to people about my ROI model. So there I was ready to impart my wisdom. A man came up and saw the flyer on the table - it was for the Tweet-up. He picked up the flyer and asked me to tell him about Tweet-up.

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Why Is Customer Satisfaction Research So Hot?

Brad Bortner

I'm really interested in getting readers perspectives on why customer satisfaction research is so hot?

One thing that has constantly amazed me since I became an Analyst at Forrester Research, is the overwhelming interest in all things concerning customer satisfaction research. Easily a third of my inquiries are about how to design such studies, how to improve what they have, what are the issues with multinational studies, and how to deal with new concepts such as NetPromoter.

Even in this dire market, it seems that customer satisfaction studies are one of growth area in market research (according to Inside Research).

This has led me to write quite a bit about customer satisfaction ("The Next Wave In Customer Satisfaction is CRM Integration, http://www.forrester.com/go?docid=47246, "Enhance Customer Satisfaction's Impact" http://www.forrester.com/go?docid=44166, and "Why Customer Satisfaction Studies Fail," http://www.forrester.com/go?docid=45043). But for those who are short on time, I'll net out a few key pointers:

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Will Private Online Communities Transform Qualitative Research?

Brad Bortner

My question to my readers is this: are MROCs the next big thing in market research, and will they eventually take measurable share form traditional qualitative research?

It is an old story.

A new mode of research comes along, and the existing research world gives it a giant raspberry.

It happened when phone pushed out face-to-face interviews for quant in the US in the 70's (What about selection bias! It can't possibly be as projectable!). It happened in the late 90's and early 2000's with online panels (What about selection bias?! What about professional survey takers?! What about response bias and poorly constructed panels?!).

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A Day In The Life Of An Information Worker

Ted Schadler

Ted-Schadler by Ted Schadler

How do information workers -- people that use computers or smartphones in their job -- spend their days?

We set out to answer that question using our new Workforce Technographics(R) data. In our launch survey to understand how regular people use computers, smartphones, and applications to get their work done, we surveyed 2,001 people in the US with jobs in which they use a computer. We asked about all kinds of things, including how much time they spend with their computers and phones, which applications they use daily or even hourly, what applications they find indispensable, whether they work mostly with other employees or with customers or partners, and much more.

Our first report is a quick snapshot of a day in the life of an information worker (iWorker). (We'll be sharing a lot more data at a Webinar on Thursday at 11 AM ET; register here.) For example, did you know that:

  • Gen X (not Gen Y) is the most likely to use Web 2.0 technology to get their job done?

  • Smartphones are available to only 11% of US information workers?

  • Email is still the only application used on an hourly basis by most iWorkers?

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Oracle On Demand Gets Customer Service Knowledge Management with Integration with Inquira

Natalie L. Petouhoff, Ph.D. By Dr. Natalie Petouhoff

Knowledge Management and Customer Service


This quarter I've started some research on knowledge management (KM) for the contact center and customer service. This is KM for both agent-assited and self-service. One of the biggest misnomers about customer service is how important great knowledge management is to good experiences. And no, I don't mean Sharepoint. That's a fine product- but for customer service- one needs to find answers and not documents.


Customers often wonder - why, when they do a search on a website or when they ask a customer service agent for help- they wonder why the search results are awful- meaning nothing that got pulled up in the search was even remotely what they needed. And they also wonder why the agents don't have THE answer.

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Analysis from Microsoft TechEd 2009 - Take 1

Head Of BI Job Description

Boris Evelson

Boris Evelson By Boris Evelson

I get many requests from Forrester clients to describe job requirements for a head of BI team, department, solutions center, etc. While Forrester does not have a formal description of such requirements, if I map such requirements to all BI best practices that I write about, here’s what I come up with:

  • Champion and rally the organization around BI. Educate senior non-IT executives on the value of BI: without measurement, there’s no management. Be able to argue that business, not IT, should own BI.
  • Build and support BI business cases (BI ROI)
  • Understand Key Performance Measures and Indicators that drive company measurement, reporting and analytics across functions like
    • Sales  
    • Marketing  
    • Customer Service  
    • Finance  
    • Operations/Logistics  
    • HR  
    • IT/Systems  
    • Compliance and Risk Management  
  • Understand how these metrics and measures align and track against overall business strategies, goals and objectives.
  • Be proficient in all aspects of BI and Information Management processes, technologies and architectures such as
    • BI delivery mechanisms: portals, thin/thick clients, email/mobile phone alerts, etc  
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Infographic: US Immigration Explorer

Reineke Reitsma

The New York Times has a great tool on their Website that gives insight into US immigration patterns:

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2009/03/10/us/20090310-immigration-explorer.html?ref=us

It's interactive, you can select country/region of origin, and you can look at actual size of the population as well as percentage. Anybody interested in researching and targeting ethnic audiences should check this out! Compliments to Matthew Bloch and Robert Gebeloff of the NYT for putting this together.

Immigration-Explorer-NY-Tim  

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The Data Digest - How US Youth Use Their Cells

Reineke Reitsma

Reineke Reitsma [Posted by Reineke Reitsma]

We’ll kick of The Data Digest with a graphic on what US 12 to 17 year olds regularly use their cells for, next to making calls obviously. SMS and MMS are the most popular activities, while only a quarter of them use their phone for IM or email. For youngsters, the phone serves as a substitute for a digital camera – about 2 in 3 phone owners takes pictures with their phone at least once a month while less than half (46%) of US youth regularly use a digital camera.

Mobile-activities  

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