Denial Of Service Attacks Have The Internets All A Twitter

John Kindervag

John Kindervag

My BlackBerry battery died more quickly than usual yesterday as I received a wave of calls from reporters wondering about the denial of service (DoS) attacks against Facebook, Twitter, and other social networking sites.  It seems many people are not aware of the long and storied history of denial of service attacks and this is their first personal experience with DoS. These types of DoS attacks have been around since the creation of the public Internet. A 15 year old named Mafiaboy famously brought down many of the top Websites of the day at the beginning of this millennium using similar techniques.

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Will Business Architecture Initiatives Put A Permanent End To Business-IT Alignment Problems?

Gene Leganza

An early 2009 Forrester interview with the CIO of a retail firm produced a great quote: “Our business execs have two views of IT: a big budget blob or their BlackBerry.” Now, maybe those retail business execs think of IT as a strategic budget blob, but it’s more likely that’s a shop with alignment issues. If that CIO’s business execs don’t see technology as enabling anything more than mobile email, then they really don’t get the power of technology and they’re not going to see the value in the IT department.

But alignment issues are not limited to shops where business execs don’t see value in technology. The whole IT-to-BT transition is about how the business is enthusiastically embracing technology – they’re just not bothering to go through the IT department to find it, deploy it, or use it. Today’s alignment problem is more about the gap between the business’s valuation of technology’s potential and their valuation of the IT department’s ability to deliver on that potential.

 

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Infographic: NY Times Uses Historic Data To Predict How The Recession Will Evolve

Reineke Reitsma

The New York Times has put together a very interesting interactive graphic that shows how recessions behaved in the past, and what this means for the future. Please note that the picture below is a static image.

NY Times Graphic

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Made-up Mobile Ad Network Numbers - Why?

Julie Ask

Saw this article today in moco ranking mobile ad networks in the US. They published these numbers, but don't stand behind them - at least entirely. I'm interested in digging a bit deeper into the UV calculation.

  1. Millennial Media: 45.6 million
  2. AOL/Platform-A's Third Screen Media: 28.6 million
  3. AdMob: 25.7 million
  4. Microsoft's MSN Ad Network: 25.4 million
  5. Jumptap: 23.4 million
  6. Quattro Wireless: 23 million

Yahoo! isn't mentioned. Google is not there - guess this doesn't include Search, but these online giants are popular at least with the consumers we survey. Oh, and no application networks or SMS. The article does back up Millennial's claim to reach. They'd have to be reaching just about every person who browses the mobile web in a given month - even those with one page view - to hit this published number. Aside from the rankings, good to see all of the networks doing so well. These numbers have been growing steadily over the past couple of years. With smartphones selling so well, usage of data services is growing. Forrester's data shows relatively few daily browsers outside of smartphone owners. Most of these ad networks show similar usage patterns. All of this traffic together Choosing ad networks isn't a topic I've researched yet. We do advocate though that brands find their customers, understand their mobile behaviors, and build a strategy from there. With the momentum in consumer adoption of mobile data services, it will soon be hard for any consumer or business-oriented brand to avoid the medium as a channel to engage with consumers for much longer.

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What Does Gen Y In The Workforce Really Mean?

TJ Keitt

Recently, I was on a call where a senior executive wondered whether or not kids entering the workforce in the next 5 years can write complete sentences now that everyone texts. For me, this is another example in an old story: fear (and some loathing) of Gen Y’s entrance into the workplace.  And frankly, as a 20-something, I think a lot of it is unfounded.

At no time is this fear more clear than when the conversation turns to approaches and technologies related to collaboration and Web 2.0 – areas that I cover for vendor strategy professionals. At this point I think I’ve heard it all. “Gen Y is bringing in unsecure consumer technology!” “We have to adopt wikis and social networks to recruit college graduates!” “Email is dead because the kids don’t use it!” Being a good sport about this, I’ve tried to shrug it off as the typical complaining one generation does about its kids. But the longer I cover this space, the more I believe this isn’t going away for two reasons:

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Complex Event Processing Is Cool - And Very Hot!

Mike Gualtieri


CEP Wave Model

The founding Fathers of the United States understood all too well the importance of complex events when on July 4th, 1776 they wrote:

"When in the course of human events it becomes necessary for one people to...etcetera, etcetera, and etcetera".

Similarly, many of today's business and IT leaders understand the importance of reacting to business events as they occur in real-time and how that can dramatically change the performance and agility of their business.

Event processing, often called "complex event processing" (CEP) is a hot new enterprise middleware category. CEP answers the question: "What is happening right now in our business"? Sometimes the answer is as simple as ordering more products when the inventory dips below safety stock, but often it involves recognizing patterns of business events that foretell critical business situations that require immediate action.

CEP platforms analyze streams of data as they flow from live sources such as transaction flows, click streams, market data feeds, and myriad other sources of data swirling around inside a business environment. The platforms then prompt either downstream applications or people to react to the information by resetting processing priorities, changing online sales strategies, buying and selling stocks, or performing some other action.

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Digeo announces Moxi Mate, a whole-home DVR play

James McQuivey

via www.moxi.com

Today Digeo went live with its Moxi Mate, the companion to its Moxi HD DVR, designed to provide whole-home DVR functionality. I sat down with Greg Gudorf, CEO of Digeo, a few weeks back and he previewed the box for me. A couple of my reactions were: 1) the quality of box-to-box streaming is phenomenal; 2) they even designed it so you can turn the panel lights off at night, assuming it will be a bedroom accessory.

The real secret power of this, however, comes with the free inclusion of PlayOn software, which allows your PC to stream online video from Netflix, Hulu, YouTube (and really any other online media content you want including music and photos) to your Moxi Mate box. This is a clever end run around the problem of trying to get the rights to integrate Hulu content into the box directly. (As we saw with Boxee, this is not something Hulu is excited to enable as it threatens their relationships with content owners.)

Love the device. But the fight over how media content will get around the home has only just begun, let the games begin!

Can Velocity Revolutionize The Data Center Business?

James Staten

James Staten


Digital Realty Trust is trying to do to the data center business what Dell did to computer manufacturing and Wal-Mart continues to do to the retail market — make delivery efficiency the killer app. It claims it can build out a complete enterprise-class, energy-efficient data center in as little as 26 weeks (versus 16-24 months by its competitors) and for less than half the competitive cost.


Bringing velocity and low price to data center construction is certainly a new concept and one that could have revolutionary implications. This area of design and construction has been very specialized, with each project being unique and the magnitude of a single order in the $50 million range. DRT, a REIT focused purely on the data center market, has made a name for itself by building and operating data centers for corporate clients.

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Brand Experience Lessons From Pixar

Ronald Rogowski

  Ron-Rogowski  [Posted by Ron Rogowski]

 

My 3 ½ year old son loves the Pixar movie “Cars.” Ok, I admit it, I love it too. It’s a feel-good story with lots of lessons, great animation and, of course, cars.

 

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So... Why This Blog?

Julie Ask

The views expressed on this website/weblog are mine alone and do not necessarily reflect the views of my employer, Forrester Research.

I started this blog because I am passionate about how technology - specifically wireless - can impact businesses and how they engage with their customers. I worked as a management consultant for a number of years before becoming a wireless industry analyst at Jupiter Research. At Jupiter, I found that I was spending a lot of time interpreting our technology (and in my case wireless) research for regular consumer product and service companies. I figured, "why not write mobile research directly for these non-telco companies," as I call them.

In 2006, I launched mobile marketing and media coverage at Jupiter. When Forrester Research acquired Jupiter Research in August 2008, I decided with my corporate transition to make a coverage transition as well. I wanted to expand upon this research I'd started at Jupiter and look at mobile strategies more broadly. I wanted to conduct research and advise our clients on how mobile can help them achieve a wide range of business objectives.

Every consumer product and services company should be considering how they will engage with their customers within the mobile environment. Many clients ask me, "How will I know when I should have a mobile presence?" I ask, "How did you know when you needed a Web presence? Was it when 5% of your customers were online? 10% Was it when your competitors had a website? When did you decide to add rich media to your website? What percentage of your customers was connecting via broadband?" I ask many of our clients this question. The answer with most is, "The decision was strategic. We knew we needed a web presence. We sensed that the Internet would be an important medium for us to engage with our customers." Mobile will be the same. A mobile presence isn't table stakes today, but it will be.

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