Netpromoter Scores In An International Context - Treat With Caution

Reineke Reitsma

Reineke Reitsma [Posted by Reineke Reitsma]

Yesterday I was in a meeting and suddenly the Netpromoter score passed by - after being buried for a while.

I have to confess that I have a somewhat troubled relationship with the Netpromoter score, it hasn't been treating me very well over the past couple of years. There was a time where Netpromoter scores were very important to me as they partly defined the success of the product I was managing and my scores weren't up to par with the rest of the organization. Was I really doing something wrong or was there another reason why the scores were lower? 

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Global versus local: how do you get the messages right?

Jennifer Belissent, Ph.D.

Jennifer Bélissent [Posted by Jennifer Bélissent]

Global marketing also requires a degree of consistency. How do you strike that balance?  My new report — Get the B2B Messages Right: Balance Global Consistency And Local Relevancy — discusses the challenge of getting the global messages right for local audiences, and provides some recommendations for how to do it.

In my newest blog post, "Global versus Local" at B2B Beyond Borders, I surface some of the data behind the report and take you behind a personal example that didn't make the report.

Where are tech buyers getting their information?

Jennifer Belissent, Ph.D.

Jennifer Bélissent [Posted by Jennifer Bélissent]

Just wanted to call attention to a couple of new Forrester reports. I’ve started drilling into the Four Ps — mostly on the promotion front.  Here are a few highlights:

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Omniture Aquisition Will Bring A Boost To Online Ad Measurement

Which is it, shortage of mainframe skills ... or jobs?

Phil Murphy

Murphy_p_small   

There is a lot of noise lately from 2 camps - one swears that the availability of people with mainframe skills is drying up rapidly - they either forecast dire shortages, or note problems hiring for certain positions internally. Most of the trade press articles are firmly in this camp.

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CA Buys NetQoS: A New Network Management Juggernaut?

Glenn O'Donnell

Glenn O'Donnell
CA is a vendor that already enjoys a leading position in overall network management. Its 2005 acquisition of Concord, which brought along the assets of the previously acquired Aprisma, instantly moved CA from an also-ran to one of the clear leaders. Concord was good, and CA has an impressive track record of growing that business since the acquisition. Still, there were some weaknesses with regard to more advanced performance analysis.

On September 14, 2009, CA finally addressed these performance gaps by announcing its intent to acquire NetQoS for $200 million. Based in Austin, TX, NetQoS is one of those exciting small companies that proved there is a better approach to many of the challenges we face. It is one of the true innovators in performance management of both infrastructure and applications.

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Defining The Generations Based On Technology Era

Ted Schadler

by Ted Schadler

Our last post on Gen X using Web 2.0 at work generated a lot of buzz in other blog posts, particularly at ReadWriteWeb.

One of the biggest comments had to do with how generations are defined.

At Forrester, we spent about a month looking at this question back in 2006 when we did our first generational analysis of the use of technology. (We've since updated that work in "The State Of Consumers And Technology: Benchmark 2008" -- available to Forrester clients.)

The more we looked, the more we realized that nobody frickin' knows. So we did what we comes naturally -- we researched it. We canvassed the universe. We read all the books and talked to a bunch of experts, mostly from the Agency world, where they know a thing or two about generations.

Since nobody had a definitive set, we create them based on blended average of the best references out there. Then we added a Forrester twist: What technology era does it correspond to? (Meaning, when they were teenagers, what technology was new to them.)

  • Gen Y: 1980-1991. This group started spending money in the mobile era -- it's still their defining characteristic. Mobile texting, making party plans on the fly while out, carrying their identity around in their phones, that's Gen Y. They don't think twice, they just do it. This group would love to use social media at work, but mobile's good enough for now thank you very much. They are 50% more likely to text while at work as Gen X (51% versus 36%.) As far as showing the rest of us the path forward, it's probably leading by example at this point in their careers.

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How do you define an "application" for app portfolio mgt purposes?

Phil Murphy

Murphy_p_small   Once apon a time ... the definition of an application was easy - firms built accounts payable, general ledger, purchasing, order entry, and other applications to meet the automation needs of the business. The applications were written as monolithic collections of functionality that were dedicated to accomplishing key business functions and had relatively clear boundaries.

However, over the years, technology shifts have resulted in "applications" that don't fit the earlier simplistic definitions. DLLs, Services / SOA, ASPs and Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) all bent the definition of an "application" from its previous form. Looking forward, Cloud computing promises to alter the definition once again.

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Can the Apple TV reinvent itself?

James McQuivey

I was in the middle of an ICTC (my new acronym for InterContinental Telepresence Conference) when I got an urgent message from Brian Chen at Wired News. Without any announcement, it seems, Apple had cut the price of its 160 GB Apple TV to $229, dropping the smaller model altogether. What did this mean? 

I've been following the Apple TV since its announcement 2.5 years ago. I bought one of the first, and I spent hundreds of dollars on TV shows testing it (I have all the episodes of Battlestar Galactica, seasons 1, 2, 3; and you don't). That said, I haven't used the Apple TV in months, even after I hacked it using Boxee. It's because the Apple TV doesn't make watching top shows easy enough to compete with cable, Hulu, and Netflix. 

Brian wrote a very solid piece in Wired News yesterday, click here to see the article. He managed to get in a lot of the big picture points I raised, which is always hard to do since I go there so quickly and barely pause to breathe. The point is this: The Apple TV is on its way out.

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Podcast: Transparency: The Next Step In Compliance

Craig Le Clair

Our latest featured podcast is Craig Le Clair's "Transparency: The Next Step In Compliance".

 

In this podcast, BP&A Principal Analyst Craig Le Clair advises listeners to prepare for the next regulatory onslaught. One way to do this, he recommends, is by converging BPM and BI.

 

 

We look forward to your questions and comments.

 

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