VMware Completes The PaaS To vCloud

James Staten

James StatenIf you’ve been wondering why an infrastructure leader would acquire a developer framework, the answer is a bit more complex that what shows
on the surfaceand a lot more strategic. As stated in the press release and in the blogs by VMware CTO Steve Herrod and SpringSource
CEO Rod Johnson, the acquisition
helps by, “creating a single, integrated, build-run-manage solution for the
data center, private clouds,
and public clouds
.” For the developer they will be able to use SpringSource
tools to fully describe their application as a VMware vApp “a deployment blueprint that describes how the various
machine images, middleware, and management components fit together and then
we can take that blueprint and ‘make it so’ with a single click,” Johnson added
in his blog.

Read more

Categories:

Don't Rely On Industry Averages For Cost Of Downtime

Stephanie Balaouras

Stephanie BalaourasOn a weekly basis, I get at least one inquiry request from either a vendor or an end-user company seeking industry averages for the cost of downtime. Vendors like to quote these statistics to grab your attention and to create a sense of urgency to buy their products or services. BC/DR planners and senior IT managers quote these statistics to create a sense of urgency with their own executives who are often loath to invest in BC/DR preparedness because they view it as a very expensive insurance policy.

BC/DR planners, senior IT managers and anyone else trying to build the business case for BC/DR should avoid the use of industry averages and other sensational statistics. While these statistics do grab attention, more often than not, they are misleading and inaccurate, and your executives will see through them. You'll hurt your business case in the end because you haven't done your homework and your execs will know it.

I saw a study recently that stated the cost of downtime for the insurance industry was $1,202,444 per hour. You might be tempted to grab this statistic and throw it into the next presentation to your C-level exec but what is this statistic really telling you? Do the demographics of the companies in the study match yours? Do you trust the accuracy of the data? Consider the following:

 

  • What is the definition of insurance industry in this case? Is it companies that focus solely on insurance or does it include companies that also provide financial advice and monetary instruments to their clients?

     

Read more

Are Your Salespeople Stupid?

Scott Santucci

Come on, admit it.  Einstein

It’s what you think, isn’t it?

If I had a dollar for every time I heard “our salespeople lack the skills or ability to (insert any of the following: cross-sell, sell higher, sell to value, get ahead of the RFP)” I would be a very rich person.

But are selling skills really the problem?

Read more

Tapping Social Networking Sites To Energize B2B Buyers

Laura Ramos

Laura Ramos [Posted by Laura Ramos]

On June 17, Forrester published my latest research on
how business buyers use social networking sites to inform purchase
decisions, the role these sites will play in future buying processes,
and three key ways for B2B marketers to tap into open, social network
value. 

Two key insights coming from this research:
discussion forums and online communities are poised to become the
online supplement for colleague interaction and the decision to join in
community activity depends mostly on the quality of the participants —
the discussion relevance, demonstrated experience, and shared
thought-leadership.

Read more

Denial Of Service Attacks Have The Internets All A Twitter

John Kindervag

John Kindervag

My BlackBerry battery died more quickly than usual yesterday as I received a wave of calls from reporters wondering about the denial of service (DoS) attacks against Facebook, Twitter, and other social networking sites.  It seems many people are not aware of the long and storied history of denial of service attacks and this is their first personal experience with DoS. These types of DoS attacks have been around since the creation of the public Internet. A 15 year old named Mafiaboy famously brought down many of the top Websites of the day at the beginning of this millennium using similar techniques.

Read more

Will Business Architecture Initiatives Put A Permanent End To Business-IT Alignment Problems?

Gene Leganza

An early 2009 Forrester interview with the CIO of a retail firm produced a great quote: “Our business execs have two views of IT: a big budget blob or their BlackBerry.” Now, maybe those retail business execs think of IT as a strategic budget blob, but it’s more likely that’s a shop with alignment issues. If that CIO’s business execs don’t see technology as enabling anything more than mobile email, then they really don’t get the power of technology and they’re not going to see the value in the IT department.

But alignment issues are not limited to shops where business execs don’t see value in technology. The whole IT-to-BT transition is about how the business is enthusiastically embracing technology – they’re just not bothering to go through the IT department to find it, deploy it, or use it. Today’s alignment problem is more about the gap between the business’s valuation of technology’s potential and their valuation of the IT department’s ability to deliver on that potential.

 

Read more

Infographic: NY Times Uses Historic Data To Predict How The Recession Will Evolve

Reineke Reitsma

The New York Times has put together a very interesting interactive graphic that shows how recessions behaved in the past, and what this means for the future. Please note that the picture below is a static image.

NY Times Graphic

Categories:

Made-up Mobile Ad Network Numbers - Why?

Julie Ask

Saw this article today in moco ranking mobile ad networks in the US. They published these numbers, but don't stand behind them - at least entirely. I'm interested in digging a bit deeper into the UV calculation.

  1. Millennial Media: 45.6 million
  2. AOL/Platform-A's Third Screen Media: 28.6 million
  3. AdMob: 25.7 million
  4. Microsoft's MSN Ad Network: 25.4 million
  5. Jumptap: 23.4 million
  6. Quattro Wireless: 23 million

Yahoo! isn't mentioned. Google is not there - guess this doesn't include Search, but these online giants are popular at least with the consumers we survey. Oh, and no application networks or SMS. The article does back up Millennial's claim to reach. They'd have to be reaching just about every person who browses the mobile web in a given month - even those with one page view - to hit this published number. Aside from the rankings, good to see all of the networks doing so well. These numbers have been growing steadily over the past couple of years. With smartphones selling so well, usage of data services is growing. Forrester's data shows relatively few daily browsers outside of smartphone owners. Most of these ad networks show similar usage patterns. All of this traffic together Choosing ad networks isn't a topic I've researched yet. We do advocate though that brands find their customers, understand their mobile behaviors, and build a strategy from there. With the momentum in consumer adoption of mobile data services, it will soon be hard for any consumer or business-oriented brand to avoid the medium as a channel to engage with consumers for much longer.

Read more

What Does Gen Y In The Workforce Really Mean?

TJ Keitt

Recently, I was on a call where a senior executive wondered whether or not kids entering the workforce in the next 5 years can write complete sentences now that everyone texts. For me, this is another example in an old story: fear (and some loathing) of Gen Y’s entrance into the workplace.  And frankly, as a 20-something, I think a lot of it is unfounded.

At no time is this fear more clear than when the conversation turns to approaches and technologies related to collaboration and Web 2.0 – areas that I cover for vendor strategy professionals. At this point I think I’ve heard it all. “Gen Y is bringing in unsecure consumer technology!” “We have to adopt wikis and social networks to recruit college graduates!” “Email is dead because the kids don’t use it!” Being a good sport about this, I’ve tried to shrug it off as the typical complaining one generation does about its kids. But the longer I cover this space, the more I believe this isn’t going away for two reasons:

Read more

Categories:

Complex Event Processing Is Cool - And Very Hot!

Mike Gualtieri


CEP Wave Model

The founding Fathers of the United States understood all too well the importance of complex events when on July 4th, 1776 they wrote:

"When in the course of human events it becomes necessary for one people to...etcetera, etcetera, and etcetera".

Similarly, many of today's business and IT leaders understand the importance of reacting to business events as they occur in real-time and how that can dramatically change the performance and agility of their business.

Event processing, often called "complex event processing" (CEP) is a hot new enterprise middleware category. CEP answers the question: "What is happening right now in our business"? Sometimes the answer is as simple as ordering more products when the inventory dips below safety stock, but often it involves recognizing patterns of business events that foretell critical business situations that require immediate action.

CEP platforms analyze streams of data as they flow from live sources such as transaction flows, click streams, market data feeds, and myriad other sources of data swirling around inside a business environment. The platforms then prompt either downstream applications or people to react to the information by resetting processing priorities, changing online sales strategies, buying and selling stocks, or performing some other action.

Read more

Categories: