Trends That Will Shape Market Research In 2010

Reineke Reitsma


Reineke Reitsma

[Posted by Reineke Reitsma]

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In hindsight, 2009 marked a turning point for the market research industry, when technology and innovation became part of the ongoing discussion on how to move the industry forward while balancing the realities of a business world in a recession.

In the recently published report 'Predictions 2010: What Will Happen In Market Research' my team and I have identified ten trends that will shape market research in 2010. Three of these ten trends are:

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More Prognostications for 2010

John Kindervag

Several of my Forrester colleagues have already weighed in with their 5_carsoninsightful 2010 predictions. I recently chatted with Shamus McGillicuddy at TechTarget where I shared my thoughts on the upcoming year. You can read the article here.  

2010 is going to be an interesting year with economic concerns impacting the security business. I suspect that businesses will need to regroup and think about their security spend again next year. Companies will probably remain gun-shy and hold budgets close to their vests. This could set up a shootout between increasing security threats and the desire to continue to control costs. Who will win? Your thoughts?

Happy Holidays y'all and here's wishing you a Secure New Year!

The Data Digest: Social Technographics in Canada

Reineke Reitsma


Reineke Reitsma

[Posted by Reineke Reitsma]

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Canadians with online access are active users of social technologies like blogs, forums, social networks, and user-generated content: According to our North American Technographics® Q3 2009 survey, 79% of online Canadians engage with social media at least once each month.

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Jugaad and Your Global Innovation Strategy

Christopher Andrews

A recent post on BusinessWeek explored an “emerging” concept in Western-style innovation management -- one that has deep roots in India - called Jugaad.  The article mentions a meeting led by my former colleague (and still friend) Navi Radjou, and notes that jugaad is “an improvisational style of innovation that’s driven by scarce resources and attention to a customer’s immediate needs.”

Explore the term “jugaad” and you will find a range of enthusiasts and detractors.  Many - particularly those more intimately familiar with the terminology -- argue that jugaad is not, by its very definition, a robust innovation solution to complex business problems.  Rather, its just another way of saying “get it done whatever it takes” – meaning that innovation is done in an inexpensive manner, “on the fly”.   In this context, it seems like a tough way for a multi-billion dollar company to build an innovation practice.

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2009 mobile trends reviewed

Thomas Husson

A year ago, I posted an entry about what I thought would be the key trends for 2009.

I'll stick to my comments and continue to believe that regulation had a stronger impact on the mobile sector than the economic crisis. The recent announcement that the French telecom regulation authority eventually (after years after back and forth discussions and lobbying) granted the 4th 3G license to Free/Iliad (one of the largest ISPs) is a good example of that. The new entrant will not launch before early 2012 but aims at captuting 10% market share by introducing cheaper tariffs (a competitive 3 hour package for less than 20€), bundling Internet access and offering interesting conditions to MVNOs. Evolution of termination rates or roaming tariffs as well as other regulations on spectrum have a much greater impact on operators' bottom line than reduced spending from consumers. 

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When is enterprise mobility not really ENTERPRISE mobility? (hint - most of the time!)

Tim Sheedy

We often hear about how important enterprise mobility is to businesses. For years ICT events companies have been holding events about "enterprise mobility" and "the future of wireless" etc - and they have filled halls with attendees and sponsors/exhibitors.

But really - is mobility really that important to businesses? Weren't the people with "mobile" in their title the first to go when the global financial crisis hit? And point me to more than a handful of businesses whose business relies on their mobility capabilities.

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Can Social Media Penetrate The Exec Suite?

Nigel Fenwick

Almost every day I hear people suggest that social media is at best only valuable as a marketing tool. There are people who believe that social media has no reach beyond a few "geeks" sitting at their computers all day. What these naysayers focus on is the technology and not the people connections. I believe it is the people connections that drive social media and it is the value of these connections that will continue to change the way we work and communicate.

With your help, I'm looking to measure the potential social media to connect people worldwide, even those senior executives and naysayers who are not already using social media. Here's how:

Three Simple Steps

We've built a very short survey on social media's value in business – nothing new here – but here's the twist: We're using social media as the vehicle, and social media evangelists (you) as the fuel, to get the survey into the hands of as many people as possible who are not yet using social media.

Here are three easy and quick steps to becoming a social media evangelist for this research: (Links removed as survey closed)

When you participate, you can request you own summary of the results when they are published, and by sharing the survey, you can also take a share of the credit in demonstrating the power of social media to connect people.

What Does The Survey Measure?

The survey will provide insight into the following:

  • The reach of social media through social connections;
  • The awareness of social media policies in the workplace
  • The level of usage of social media in the workplace
  • The perception of social media's value in business
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A Happy Holiday For Retailers?

IT Service Customers Need More Effective Ways To Contract For Innovation

Christopher Andrews

Take a look at Forrester’s recent Enterprise IT Services Survey and you will find a data point that highlights an interesting challenge in the IT services marketplace.  When we asked North American and European IT services clients about their biggest challenges with existing IT services and outsourcing relationships, 52% said that “cost savings are lower than expected and 40% said “inconsistent or poor quality service”.   No real surprises here:  given the large number of companies that partner with service providers in an explicit effort to lower costs, many IT professionals simply underestimate the time and resources it takes to define and manage these relationships. 

But look at the #3 and #4 responses, and the data gets more interesting.   33% of respondents said that their biggest challenges were “lack of innovation and or/continuous service-level improvements” and 35% cited “inability of vendor/contract to respond rapidly to changing business needs”.   Don’t the first two responses, in some ways, conflict with the latter two?

These data point to a complaint Forrester hears all the time from professionals within the technology industry:  they know that their clients want a proactive business partner – one who can help the client drive innovation and business results – but they don’t know how to charge for innovation in a way that clients will be willing to pay for it.  Clients say they want greater level of business innovation from their IT service providers, but prioritize cost-reductions – which are more easily measured and which justify the investment in the IT services relationship.

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Crafting your technology strategy for business impact

Alex Cullen

That your technology strategy should be driven by business is a truism. We all know this -  architecture, strategy and IT overall should be driven by business needs, strategies and outcomes.

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