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Carrie Johnson

[posted by Elizabeth Davis]

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Designing in a high-resoultion world...help!

Ronald Rogowski

I’m Richard Gans, a Researcher on Forrester’s Customer Experience team.  Ron Rogowski and I just published some research about designing sites to work in a high-resolution world.  What did we find? The good old days of having simple choices for what size screen to optimize your site for are long over.  Now, the majority of screens have surpassed 1024x768 with no single standard resolution in sight.

 

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SaaS: Vendors Separated By A Common Language

Peter O'Neill

Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) is rapidly becoming “Everything-as-a-Service” (or, as a client said to me last week, “All-as-a-Service”).  I’ve been reporting the impact of SaaS on IT management software for nearly two years now and I keep saying that SaaS is really a phenomenon of new market entrants with compelling arguments against incumbent suppliers. Operators like ServiceNow.com, ManageEngine, Splunk, and SpiceWorks are leading a charge to replace HP, BMC Software, and CA installations. So it’s NOT really a trend impacting small and medium businesses only: many enterprises, even large ones, now also prefer a SaaS solution for their systems monitoring, IT asset management, service desk, or even discovery and CMDB management.

In the last weeks there has been a series of SaaS announcements by the megavendors. But the inquiries coming in from Forrester clients imply that things are not all that clear on these announcements. So here is a quick summary. As you will see, while riding the SaaS wave, they each interpret it differently.

CA now has a Service Desk On Demand offering based on their Service Desk r12 product. It’s run on dedicated installation in their data center or as a multi-tenant instance in one of CA’s partners installations also hosted there. CA clearly wants to limit the service to their target enterprise market.  They will control this by requiring a minimum 1 year contract (with financial incentives for signing for 2 or even 3 years), a minimum of 50 service desk analysts (you pay per analyst per month) and, most importantly, you cannot just sign up for the service on the web, you have to be approved by CA first.

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Why Comcast-NBCU really IS about digital

James McQuivey

Today is the big day: when Comcast announces it has taken a controlling share of NBCU in the latest mega media merger. And though the media have been covering it rapaciously for months now, the obligatory reaction stories are now being posted, analyzing something we should really know by now, namely:

 

This deal isn't about clamping down on runaway digital video content to save cable's collective hide.

 

If you're not careful, you may run into people who assert the contrary. Rafat Ali of paidcontent.org, whose opinion I generally value, earlier today titled his remarks "Comcast-NBC Deal Isn't About Digital." By which he means it's not about purely digital content (generation or delivery). While that's true, when he then goes on to say that Comcast's digital moves (thePlatform, Fancast) don't have "the potential to change the game for the cable giant," he is 100% wrong.

 

Because the future of cable is entirely dependent on digital. The future of all media of any sort is dependent on digital. Ergo so is the deal.

 

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In 2010, your clients will care about more than just cutting costs

Christopher Andrews

Ask any business professional whether, as they look to 2010, they care more about cutting internal costs or whether they care more about driving new business-focused innovations, and you’re likely to get the response “yes…to both”.  In the wake of the 2009 recession, companies are struggling with these sometimes conflicting objectives – on one hand they know that cost cutting and operating efficiently is a mandate.  On the other, they must develop new technology –enabled product, service, and business model innovations or they risk falling behind. 

For vendors in the B2B technology marketplace, this means balancing the need to communicate the cost-effectiveness of your product or service with messages that stress the business value you provide.   I believe that far too many vendors think that only the lowest-cost provider can succeed right now, when proving strategic business value is still a critical priority for all professionals - particularly IT professionals.

For a company that gets it, look to GlobalLogic, the offshore product development firm.  Their Vice President Milind Patwardhan recently told me “cutting costs for clients is the ‘table stakes’ right now.  The best technology companies focus on reducing costs, but also seek to partner with clients to enable business results.”  While many vendors talk this talk, one of their client references confirmed the value: He told me that GlobalLogic worked with business executives on strategic planning, was willing to take on risks in order to strengthen the relationship, and proactively looked for ways to create innovation. 

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Online Canadians Have Aggressively Embraced Social Technologies -- And So Have Canadian Marketers

Nate Elliott

I've spent the last year living and working in Vancouver, Canada -- speaking with many Canadian interactive marketers and agencies, and collecting survey data on Canadian consumers -- so I'm pleased to say that yesterday we released a new report, Canadian Social Technographics Revealed, and added our latest Canadian data to our free Social Technographics Profile Tool.

In researching this report, I learned that:

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The new ISO 31000 risk management standard . . . well-written, but not earth-shattering

Chris McClean

By now, many of you have read the newly released ISO 31000 Risk management - Principles and guidelines standard. (Others may have seen its release draft or be familiar with its predecessor the AS/NZS 4360 standard.)

It provides a well-written, step-by-step guide to risk management processes that can be applied to whole organizations, or any part thereof. So far, it has received well-deserved praise for its surprising brevity and consolidated value. These are especially important characteristics for a document with as lofty a goal as standardizing what it calls “an integral part of all organizational processes.”

But if we expect the availability of ISO 31000 to have any sort of revolutionary or game-changing impact in the immediate future, we’re getting way ahead of ourselves.

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What to do with Social Media and Market Research?

Brad Bortner

Social media is the interesting guest at the market research party that the hosts don't quite know what to do with. (My past blogs on this topic include: Social Media, Even Home Home on the Range, and Will Private Online Communities Transform Qualitative Research

Vast numbers of people are congregating online to discuss a vast variety of issues, ranging from their social lives to what is the best server to buy for their business. It is so vast, that it is troublesome getting a handle on it. Surely, any specific online community has lots of systematic biases, so it can't be treated as projectable to anything but that community, right? Of course, the same can be said of any qualitative research. Some of the approaches and techniques that are of interest to market researchers include:

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Do You Have A Handle On Game-Changing IT Trends?

Sharyn Leaver

Maybe it’s because it’s planning season. Maybe it’s because they’re just tired of focusing on cost-cutting and incremental improvements. Or maybe the IT to Business Technology (BT) shift – where the boundary between IT and the business is blurred as businesses become ever more technology dependent and technologically savvy – is becoming a reality and pushing CIOs to stay even further ahead of their business counterparts.

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The State Of EA In 2009 – A Disconnect Between Goals And Activities?

Alex Cullen

In September-October Forrester conducted its State of Enterprise Architecture survey – a broad look at EA in the context of the IT & business organization. We asked respondents questions ranging from where does the architecture function report, to the state of completeness of various architecture domains, the key technologies firms will be making significant architecture decisions about, and the degree of support for EA by various constituencies ranging from application developers to corporate business management. An upcoming series of reports from Forrester will discuss the survey results.

Last week, I conducted a webinar for the survey respondents – highlighting the results and discussing ‘what it means’. Webinar participants were very engaged in the discussion of the results – and with the broader question of the relationship and impact of EA to the larger business organization it is part of. 

Two figures that really stood out and generated discussion: 

We asked survey respondents – who were primarily architects in large enterprises – to identify the drivers for the EA program – essentially the mission and charter for the architecture organization.

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