It’s Berlin, Circa 1989, and the Media Industries Are East Germany

James McQuivey

Allow me to add my voice to the chorus of those applauding the fall of the Berlin wall twenty years ago this month. It was this event that taught me firsthand why revolution is simultaneously impossible as well as inevitable. In 1986 I sat with other students from around the globe just blocks from the wall and debated whether it would ever come down. The naïve among us insisted freedom was imperative: It was inevitable. The others asked if we had stopped to think about the massive relocation of people, economic resources, and government structures that such a revolution would require: It was impossible.

Until it happened, just three years later.

 

Brandenburg tor eastside

The author, pictured left, photographed in front of the Brandenburg
Gate from what was then the East German side

 

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It's Been A While, Why — And What's Going On With Sales Enablement These Days?

Scott Santucci

It’s been a long time since I’ve updated this blog, and it’s been brought to my attention by many of you as we discuss the sales enablement topic at: conferences, meetings, over peaking duck Peking duck (wow, this is what happens when you trust Word too much in your edits and try to get something out too quickly over the voices of children who want you to go downstairs and play Wii with them), or during inquires.   (NOTE: guys, if you add comments, I know you are reading!!)

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Are IT departments in Asia Pacific still focused on IT process improvement?

Tim Sheedy

Recent research undertaken by Forrester across Asia Pacific has indicated that while there is clearly a strong drive to improve the efficiency of IT systems, this will not often be through the implementation of process improvement systems, such as ITIL or CMM.

 
Major IT Management Themes In Asia Pacific
Forrester BDS data
Source: Enterprise Global Technology Adoption Survey, Asia Pacific, Latin America, Middle East, And Africa, Q1 2009
 

 

So why has interest in these processes suddenly plummeted in Asia Pacific? While I have no strong evidence of the answer to the question, the many discussions I have had with IT leaders across the region leads me to believe that a number of factors have lead organizations to delay or put a stop to their ITIL process improvements and their broader ITSM initiatives. 

 

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Oprah abandons broadcast TV for a life in cable: Oprah, we need to talk...

James McQuivey

Just this Monday Sarah Palin told Oprah she was "the queen of talk shows." Which might mean there's no better time to abdicate the throne than when you're clearly on top (and when the #2 talk show, Dr. Phil is produced by you). 

But Oprah didn't just announce that when she wraps her 25th season in 2011 she will wrap the show for good. No, she announced that she would also begin the next chapter in her mega-successful life: she's going to move to cable. Her cable network, titled OWN, for Oprah Winfrey Network, was actually announced some time ago, so while that's not news, the fact that Ms. Winfrey is moving away from daytime television's most-watched show to build a fledgling cable network is an eyebrow-raiser. 

Because cable TV is no safe haven away from the woes of broadcasters.

Audiences are fragmenting, cable TV is having a harder and harder time maintaining viewers in the face of the DVR and Hulu one-two punch. In fact, OWN was supposed to be up and running this winter but was postponed because of the challenging advertiser climate. It's a climate that's not going to get dramatically better even if our economy continues to improve. That's because advertisers have many alternatives for their advertising dollars, including the Internet, where more and more spending is shifting every day, reaching nearly $26 billion this year (see our July 2009 Interactive Marketing Forecast report for more detail).

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The Data Digest: A Deep Dive Into Asian Consumers' Online Behavior

Reineke Reitsma

Reineke Reitsma [Posted by Reineke Reitsma]

Follow me on a

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A final snapshot of our Marketing Forum EMEA

Zia Daniell Wigder

By Zia Daniell Wigder

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Forgive the
long post, but I wanted to make sure I captured the final sessions of our
Marketing Forum EMEA for those of you who were unable to join us in London over the past
couple of days.

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The mobile revolution is just getting started

Thomas Husson

I just presented the latest findings of a new research published "Mobile Technographics in Europe" to Forrester clients at our London Consumer Forum.

This report looks at the state of the European mobile market and at how consumers are using mobile services. We have created different profiles looking at how consumers are using their mobile phones in the different countries.

Over the past two years, the introduction of the iPhone has changed the way consumers and brands perceive mobile phones. It acted as a marketing catalyst, raising awareness of smarter devices and conveying the idea that there are as many mobile services as there are consumers. Consumers will continue to shift their attitudes toward mobile phones — perceiving them not only as communication tools but also increasingly as entertaining and productive devices that can help them in their daily lives. More than 40% of European consumers are beginning to demonstrate sophisticated usage of mobile services.

We expect this to grow over time led by the two most sophisticated group of users (SuperConnecteds and Entertainers). They will change the general perception of mobile phones:

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On to day 2 of Forrester’s Marketing Forum EMEA

Zia Daniell Wigder

By Zia Daniell Wigder

4111467759_75ef3c2cd1

Our events are well underway in London: We spent Monday with Forrester Leadership Board’s eBusiness Council, then on Tuesday the official Marketing Forum EMEA kicked off. You can follow some of the conversation live on our other blogs - I’ve also
summarized a few of the keynotes below.

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Are IT Benchmarks Useful?

Marc Cecere

by Marc Cecere

Recently, Forrester surveyed a number of CIOs to collect benchmark data on staffing ratios and spending. This is a new initiative within Forrester and one that is not yet complete. We did this for three reasons:

 

  1. Benchmark questions (called inquiries at Forrester) on staffing have become relatively common. Examples are “Can you tell us the average share of IT Staff as a % of total staff by organization size” and “Would you have specific spending figures for IT infrastructure?”. 
  2. This kind of data in conjunction with other data and analysis can identify problem areas. 
  3. Staffing benchmark data along with spending and other data are objective measures of IT organizations. 

Though our initial sample size is small a preliminary view of the data shows that:

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The Madoff Scandal Widens to Include IT

Chris McClean

The SEC announced on Friday that it is charging two computer programmers for their alleged participation in the Ponzi scheme for which Bernard Madoff pleaded guilty and headed off to jail last March.

In its complaint, the SEC alleges that, “Madoff and his lieutenant Frank DiPascali, Jr., routinely asked (Jerome) O'Hara and (George) Perez for their help in creating records that, among other things, combined actual positions and activity from... market-making and proprietary trading businesses with the fictional balances maintained in investor accounts.”

The SEC further alleges that O’Hara and Perez tried to cover their tracks by deleting hundreds of files, withdrew hundreds of thousands of dollars from their investments through the company, told Madoff they wanted to stop helping him, and then accepted larger salaries and substantial bonuses for their promise to keep quiet.

It will be interesting to watch this case unfold. I was hoping it would get into issues of whether the IT professionals were considered just uninvolved support staff or key participants in the scheme. Considering the evidence SEC claims to have, I don’t think we’ll hear those arguments in this case, but keep an eye out for how the defense comes together. Fraud prevention is a growing area of concern for government, health care, insurance, financial services, and other industries... which means we could be seeing more cases questioning the responsibility of IT to identify and/or prevent such issues.

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