Identifying The Technologies That Will Matter

Alex Cullen

CIOs want to know what new technologies they should watch
for their firm’s possible use.  They need
to know when they should make an investment of time to learn a technology, and educate
their business on its potential – or be prepared to answer their questions.  They want to time their own adoption - for
example, with cloud-based
services
, they want to maximize benefits, avoid the bleeding edge, and smoothly
fold it in with their plans.  CIOs need a
‘technology watch list' when they have a central architecture teams, they delegate
creating this list to that team.  These
teams tap their sources - and one source the architecture teams tap to scan the
long list of technologies is Forrester.

 

At Forrester, we are challenged to identify the top
technologies, too.  Our problem is a bit
different from our clients – we follow so many technologies, hear from so vendors
and thought leaders, and of course every analyst will have their own network
and assessment.  To sort through
everything that could be on a watch list and pick the ones which CIOs should
watch, we involve many analysts and use a simple set of criteria:

 

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Forrester's Consumer Forum 2009 Coming Up

Reineke Reitsma

Reineke Reitsma [Posted by Reineke Reitsma]

Forrester’s Consumer Forum 2009, October 27 and 28 in Chicago, is fast approaching. This event will help you understand how consumers' evolving online behavior demands that firms step up efforts to engage them, and we have great speakers ligned up from companies like Microsoft, Acxiom, Hewlett Packard, Best Buy, Pizza Hut, InterContinental Hotels Group, Hearst Magazines Digital Media, Hilton Hotels, and E*TRADE, who'll share their companies' best practices for creating breakthrough multichannel relationships, .

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The Dream Stack For Developing And Deploying Web Applications

Mike Gualtieri

Mike_Gualtieri_ForresterI want to develop a Web application - a really good Web app. The kind of Web app that will make me so rich that I can buy an $9.4 million co-op over looking Central Park, a Yacht registered in Monaco, and hire an architect to build my dream-house west of Boston that is a combo of Buckminster Fuller, FLW, and MTV cribs.

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Forrester’s Consumer Forum 2009

JP Gownder

Forrester’s Consumer Forum 2009 is fast approaching — October 27 and 28 in Chicago! At this Event, leading Forrester analysts will present research on how evolving consumer online behavior demands that firms step up efforts to engage them, and executives will share their companies' best practices for creating breakthrough multichannel relationships.

 

This year's event has some personal relevance to me: I invited Brad Brooks, the Microsoft keynote, and will be conducting Q&A with him on stage. Julie Ask, who has developed an entirely new research practice in 2009, is a wonderful analyst on my team; she's conducting a main stage panel and a CPS Track session speech. Speaking of the CPS track session, we have Forrester's star speaker James McQuivey doing double duty with two sessions, along with Bobby Tulsiani. 

 

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The Great Escape: Role Model For Enabling The Great Sale

Assessing The Maturity Of Cloud Computing Services

James Staten

James StatenThe number one challenge in cloud computing today is determining what it really is, what categories of services exist within the definition and business model and how ready these options are for enterprise consumption. Forrester defines cloud computing as a standardized IT capability (services, software, or infrastructure) delivered via Internet technologies in a pay-per-use, self-service way.

While definition is crucial to having a fruitful discussion of cloud, the proper taxonomy and maturity of these options is more important when planning your investment strategy. To this aim, Forrester has just published our latest Tech Radar that maps the existing cloud service categories (not the individual vendors within each category) along maturity and value impact lines to help you build your strategic roadmap.

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Gen Yers Won’t Make Companies Collaborative – Tools Integrated Into Business Processes Will

TJ Keitt

A few weeks ago, my colleage Ted Schadler caused a bit of a stir when he revealed – shockingly! – Gen Xers were actually leading the social technology revolution for information and knowledge management – not Gen Yers. I want to double down on this idea: Gen Yers aren’t driving the business use of any collaboration technologies. In a report that I’ve just completed, we show that despite their much ballyhooed technical savvy, Gen Yers are just as apathetic toward all of the fancy new collaboration software – like web conferencing and team workspaces – as their older colleagues. You’ll note I said “apathetic.” Well, beyond email and calendars, information workers really aren’t using these tools. If that gives strategists and marketers at the software giants that produce these tools pause, the fact that Gen Yers still see their organizations as collaborative, even though they don’t use “collaboration tools,” should be alarming.

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The Data Digest: Why People Buy Online

Reineke Reitsma

Reineke Reitsma [Posted by Reineke Reitsma]

There are many reasons why people are buying products online, but we wanted to understand the main driver. Data from our North American Technographics online survey shows that when consumers are forced to make a choice low price wins but is followed by high quality.

Importance-buying-online

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The Role of Social Media in Creating Customer Engagement

Laura Ramos

Laura Ramos [Posted by Laura Ramos]

Customer reference programs, advisory boards, and customer councils are vital activities in B2B marketing. But these activities risk sliding into second-class status among
executives if marketers fixate too much on numbers and not enough on
creating community involvement among these highly-engaged customers.

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Bridge the Financial Divide with Netbooks

Jennifer Belissent, Ph.D.

Jennifer Bélissent [Posted by Jennifer Bélissent]

There was a great mobile banking article in the Economist last week.   It reminded me of a report written by GSMA on its Mobile Money for the Unbanked initiative that came out a few months back.  The GSMA report points out that mobility penetrMobile penetration and financial accessation is much higher in emerging markets than is access to financial services — an opportunity for mobile operators and banks to work together to bridge the financial divide.  So, I began mulling the opportunity that these trends provide for netbook adoption:  why don’t netbook vendors partner with local banks to deliver financial services via 3G-enabled netbooks.

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