How Mature Is Your Digital Experience Delivery Practice?

Anjali Yakkundi

Application development and delivery (AD&D) groups must establish technical services and tools to enable marketing and business groups to deliver and optimize web and mobile customer experiences. But today, we’re falling well short of our goal. Forrester data reveals that 51% of marketing leaders believe that technology management groups don’t accelerate their path to success.

To help AD&D pros mature and better serve marketing, eBusiness, and other lines of business responsible for delivering customer experience, Forrester created a digital experience delivery maturity model based on interviews with senior AD&D leaders over the past 24 months. We found that success was tied to maturity not just in solutions deployed or development methodologies. Instead, success and maturity was based on four fundamental categories, many of which are technology agnostic:

  • Strategic planning. Digital experience delivery maturity is largely based on how well they have strategized, planned, and executed their digital experience delivery programs. This dimension will evolve from project-based work to a more comprehensive strategy that spans business, marketing, and technical teams.
  • People. Organizational support is a critical component to success for growing internal expertise and creating digital experience teams that are responsive to business needs. This isn't just limited to who you've hired to be on the team. Instead, people issues focus more broadly on organizational issues like organizational structure (e.g. do your developers sit in marketing? Within technology management?), collaboration, shared values, and services partner strategy.
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The reports of my death are greatly exaggerated.

Rusty Warner

Apologies to those purists who recognize this post’s title as a misquote of Mark Twain. In this case I’m not referring to myself, Samuel Langhorne Clemens, or indeed any human being, so I’ve gone with the more popular expression. Instead, I’m talking about campaigns – you know, those marketing tactics declared dead by many, but which brands continue to leverage for cross-channel communications. Back in February, Forrester’s Tracy Stokes used a similar analogy in her excellent post “Digital Marketing is Dead; Long Live Post-Digital Marketing: What It Means for CMOs.”

I’m resurrecting the theme because campaign management is alive and well. That being said, Customer Insights (CI) professionals now approach campaigns much differently than in the past. Smart marketers know they must engage their customers with contextually relevant content that sparks an interaction cycle and provides utility while creating a value exchange.  Orchestrated appropriately, campaign management can be a key enabler for post-digital marketing.

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The Future Of Healthcare

Skip Snow

As the healthcare industry depends increasingly on software to drive the change to value-based care from transaction-based compensation, the future of global healthcare is increasingly bound to the technology that will deliver:

  • Patient engagement to create behavior change for health optimization.
  • Integration solutions that will allow stakeholders to share information about populations and individuals across the ecosystem.
  • Cloud-based solutions that will allow services to reach scale without the need for the contemporary care system or health insurance vendor to grow infrastructure.
  • Branded medical services, such as oncology advice engines that allow a regional cancer specialist to deliver a better quality of care because she will have, for example, access to the most advanced protocols for her patients via smart software powered by companies such as IBM but with the built-in expertise of our great medical centers such as Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.
  • The Rise of consumer health repositories will work against info sharing in the eco-system - crossing the divide between protected data owned by covered entities, under various global privacy laws such as HIPAA, and consumer controled data subject to the corporate policy of various business entites such as Microsoft, Apple, Samsung, and others will remain dificualt and cumbersome.
  • A deeply connected fabric of data that combines social, administrative, and clinical data together in order to gain insight from the new tools of big data.
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Reflections on CA World 2014: CA Technologies Is Going All Disco

Eveline Oehrlich

We attended the recently held CA World 2014 in Las Vegas which we estimate had about 5000 customers. Over and over we kept asking: What’s the intention of CA Technologies for this year’s event?

It’s not just that the event had Magic Johnson speaking about his past career and how he transformed from a world class athlete to a successful business man or the Tuesday night music event by Fray, a rock band from Denver, Colorado.  It was the entire atmosphere of the showcase, keynotes and presentation styles which gave us the feeling this is really a new CA – a CA that wants to shed the image of suits and complex solutions and replace it with T-shirts, jeans and cool, digital solutions. 

Envision a large solution floor scattered with CA Technology solutions and some of their partners; coffee, food and snack stations, surrounded by presentation theaters which featured topics like Business Intelligence, DevOps, Mobility, Security and Business Intelligence.  Very different, very vogue and very modern! Most important we saw a CA which stressed that “every company is a software company and innovation is key to create a powerful advantage” (quote from Amit Chatterjee, CA Technologies during keynote on Tuesday).  Sentences like “we are living in the application economy” and “mobile, the new interface for your mainframe” puzzled and excited both legacy installed base, prospects and other clients. 

As analysts we have to say “Well done CA Technologies”.  For attendees , next steps are how to transform into the digital business.  Keynote presenters from Twitter, Facebook, Nike and Samsung made it sound like a walk in the park – reality is proving us differently, but CA is driving innovation in today’s application economy.  

Facebook Has Finally Killed Organic Reach. What Should Marketers Do Next?

Nate Elliott

After years of pushing brands’ reach lower with one hand (and opening marketers’ wallets with the other) Facebook has finally announced the end of organic social marketing on its site.

In a Friday night blog post the social giant warned brands that “Beginning in January 2015, people will see less of this type of content [promotional page posts] in their News Feeds,” and admitted that brands that post promotional content “will see a significant decrease in distribution.”

It’s not as if marketers could count on much organic reach or engagement anyway. Ogilvy reported that in February 2014 large brands’ Facebook posts reached just 2% of their fans (a number that was falling by .5% per month). And earlier this year a Forrester study showed that on average, only .07% of top brands’ Facebook fans interact with each of their posts. But Facebook’s latest announcement will certainly make matters worse.

What should marketers do now? Today we published a report called “Social Relationship Strategies That Work” that details several options. Two of the most important things brands can do are:

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US Mobile Payments Will Reach $142B By 2019

Denée Carrington

The media frenzy around mobile payments — most recently Apple Pay — has reached fever pitch and led some industry spectators to conclude that a payments revolution is at hand. Not so. The adoption of mobile payments is an evolution — not a revolution — and the evolution is well underway. Although the landscape of mobile payment providers is in an ongoing state of flux, the ecosystem and mobile capabilities are maturing and consumer and merchant adoption is accelerating.  Over the next five years, US mobile payments will grow from $52 billion in 2014 to $142 billion by 2019 with both national brands and local merchants.  Over the next five years, we can expect: 

  • Consumers undergoing a mobile mind shift will create new mobile moments in commerce. Over the last five years, US consumers have adopted smartphones at a breakneck pace – growing from just 19% in 2009 to 66% in 2014.As consumers integrate mobile into every aspect of their lives, they are turning to their mobile devices to get things done wherever they are. Consumers are undergoing a mobile mind shift: “the expectation that I can get what I want in my immediate context and moments of need. Their increasing reliance on their mobile phones gives rise to higher expectations — it has ushered in the emergence of mobile moments in which businesses can find new opportunities to meet or surpass customer expectations in payments and commerce.
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The European Mobile Workspace Will Transform The Way We Work

Dan Bieler

The provider of your mobile workspace solutions will be more than just a provider of technology. Rather, the right provider will have to bring the right assets and experience to act as a strategic partner during the mobile mind shift transition. Therefore, a critical first step to succeed is to understand the vendor landscape for mobile workspace solutions. Picking the right service partner is particularly hard across Europe where specific user requirements and a fragmented and heterogeneous vendor landscape make the selection a complex task. My new report, Market Overview: European Mobile Workspace Services, assists CIOs in drawing up a mobile workspace strategy by providing an overview of the market and the key vendors. It includes profiles of Atos, Computacenter, CSC, HP, IBM, Orange, Telefónica, T-Systems, Unisys, and Vodafone. The key takeaways are as follows:

  • Business processes define mobile workspace solutions – not vice versa. CIOs need to collaborate with business-line managers to analyze and define actual business processes that can be enhanced through mobile workspace solutions. Only then can CIOs define the business technology that is required to support the business.
  • The European mobile workspace market is heterogeneous. Forrester data highlights big differences in business requirements and approaches regarding mobile workspace solutions. These differences make it all the more important for the CIO to select a vendor that understands specific business requirements and national markets for mobile workspace solutions.
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Ready to Write Your Digital Strategy? Read This First.

China Will Become The First $1 Trillion Online Retail Market By 2019

During Tuesday’s 11.11 (Singles’ Day) Shopping Festival, Alibaba set new online retail records: 278.5 million orders with a GMV exceeding RMB 57 billion ($9.3 billion) (43% of which came from mobile devices). This comes on the heels of the world’s biggest IPO earlier this year, in which Alibaba raised $25 billion. Alibaba’s smaller rival JD.com, which raised $1.7 billion in its own IPO, received more than 14 million orders (40% of which came from mobile) on Singles’ Day 2014, an increase of more than 120% over November 11, 2013. Powered by the cash that their IPOs generated and growing demand among Chinese consumers, Forrester forecasts that China will become first $1 trillion online retail market by 2019.

Several factors contribute to this tremendous growth, including:

  • The rise of mobile shopping
  • eCommerce’s increasing wallet share and category expansion
  • Improving logistics
  • Penetration into lower-tier cities
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Telcos Prepare For A Roller Coaster Ride In 2015 And Beyond

Dan Bieler
We predict that the telecom business model will undergo dramatic transformation in 2015: a minority of telecoms will manage to reinvent their business model and will enter new market segments and get stronger. Meanwhile a majority of telcos will be bought or go out of business, thus driving consolidation.
At the same time, for business leaders, having access to quality network infrastructure represents a vital underpinning for their digital business and their long-term competitive advantage. We predict that by 2015 and beyond:
 
  • The telco business model will shift from sustaining to enabling critical infrastructure. Traditionally, the telco business model focused on sustaining operational efficiency of network infrastructure. In the years ahead, we predict a shift toward enabling solutions that support telco clients to engage with their customers more effectively. This mirrors not only the CIO’s shift from IT towards business technology but will also be the overarching theme during the transformation of the telco business model.
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